Co-founder of video game firm Tripwire ousted after tweeting he’s ‘proud’ of Texas abortion law

The co-founder of video game firm Tripwire has stepped down from his role as CEO and has been replaced after tweeting that he’s ‘proud’ of the new Texas law that bans abortions after six weeks.

John Gibson has since been replaced ‘effective immediately’ by current vice president Alan Wilson, who will take over as interim CEO.

‘Proud of #USSupremeCourt affirming the Texas law banning abortion for babies with a heartbeat,’ Gibson tweeted on Saturday. 

‘As an entertainer I don’t get political often. Yet with so many vocal peers on the other side of this issue, I felt it was important to go on the record as a pro-life game developer.’

John Gibson, left, has since been replaced ‘effective immediately’ by current vice president Alan Wilson, right, who will take over as interim CEO

Gibson had tweeted that he's 'proud' of the new Texas law that bans abortions after six weeks

Gibson had tweeted that he's 'proud' of the new Texas law that bans abortions after six weeks

Gibson had tweeted that he’s ‘proud’ of the new Texas law that bans abortions after six weeks

Tripwire announced that Gibson had stepped down from his role in a statement posted on the company's website

Tripwire announced that Gibson had stepped down from his role in a statement posted on the company's website

Tripwire announced that Gibson had stepped down from his role in a statement posted on the company’s website

Tripwire released a statement on Monday, noting that Gibson’s views didn’t reflect those of the Georgia-based company.  

‘The comments given by John Gibson are of his own opinion, and do not reflect those of Tripwire Interactive as a company,’ the company’s statement reads.

‘His comments disregarded the values of our whole team, our partners and much of our broader community. Our leadership team at Tripwire are deeply sorry and are unified in our commitment to take swift action and to foster a more positive environment.’ 

Tripwire says it will hold a company-wide town hall meeting to engage in an ‘open dialogue’ with employees through the leadership transition.  

The company noted that Wilson has been with Tripwire since it was formed in 2005. 

As of Tuesday, Gibson’s presence within the company he co-founded remained heavily documented. It was not immediately clear if Tripwire would go as far as updating references to him on the game publisher’s website.

According to its website, Tripwire published popular games in the Killing Floor and Rising Storm franchises, which have collectively sold more than 12 million copies

According to its website, Tripwire published popular games in the Killing Floor and Rising Storm franchises, which have collectively sold more than 12 million copies

According to its website, Tripwire published popular games in the Killing Floor and Rising Storm franchises, which have collectively sold more than 12 million copies

Tripwire is also behind the popular online game Chivalry II

Tripwire is also behind the popular online game Chivalry II

Tripwire is also behind the popular online game Chivalry II

One reference includes a quote from Gibson, which reads: ‘It’s an exciting time to be a game developer, and we’re honored to have the ability to help others by utilizing what has worked for us and avoiding what hasn’t worked.

‘So we look forward to collaborating with great teams and getting more amazing games out there for gamers to enjoy!’

Others in the gaming community were quick to respond to Gibson’s post on Saturday, including other companies that have worked with Tripwire in the past.

‘We cannot in good conscience continue to work with Tripwire under the current leadership structure,’ tweeted Shipwright Studios. 

‘We will begin the cancellation of our existing contracts effective immediately.’ 

According to its website, Tripwire published popular games in the Killing Floor and Rising Storm franchises, which have collectively sold more than 12 million copies. 

Texas’s law, which came into effect on September 1, prohibits abortions once medical professionals can detect cardiac activity, usually around six weeks — before some women know they’re pregnant. It doesn’t make exceptions for rape or incest.

Courts have blocked other states from imposing similar restrictions, but Texas’ law differs significantly because it leaves enforcement up to private citizens through civil lawsuits instead of criminal prosecutors. 

It allows any private citizen to sue Texas abortion providers who violate the law, as well as anyone who ‘aids or abets’ a woman getting the procedure. Abortion patients themselves, however, cannot be sued. 

Link hienalouca.com

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