How the Queen is reshaping her life, writes MATTHEW DENNISON

With the announcement of a national lockdown in March 2020, an extraordinary and unexpected opportunity opened up for the Queen and Prince Philip.

At last, after more than seven decades of marriage, the Royal husband and wife, then aged 93 and 98 respectively, were able to experience something approaching the shared leisure enjoyed by other elderly couples.

Temporarily released from many duties by the pandemic and the instruction to shield, they spent more continuous time together than they ever had, walking in the gardens of Windsor Castle, dining together and enjoying a peaceful final chapter in a long-lasting and successful marriage.

As a fresh lockdown was announced in December, they were reunited again for what would be their last Christmas together, the Queen making her traditional festive broadcast from Windsor rather than Sandringham.

But just months later, she would be facing the loss of her beloved husband only a few weeks short of his 100th birthday. As the country mourned, his death would, she said, leave a ‘huge void’ in her life.

It is a void possibly even greater than most people realise.

With the announcement of a national lockdown in March 2020, an extraordinary and unexpected opportunity opened up for the Queen and Prince Philip. At last, after more than seven decades of marriage, the Royal husband and wife, then aged 93 and 98 respectively, were able to experience something approaching the shared leisure enjoyed by other elderly couples. (Above, the couple in June 2020 at Windsor Castle)

With the announcement of a national lockdown in March 2020, an extraordinary and unexpected opportunity opened up for the Queen and Prince Philip. At last, after more than seven decades of marriage, the Royal husband and wife, then aged 93 and 98 respectively, were able to experience something approaching the shared leisure enjoyed by other elderly couples. (Above, the couple in June 2020 at Windsor Castle)

With the announcement of a national lockdown in March 2020, an extraordinary and unexpected opportunity opened up for the Queen and Prince Philip. At last, after more than seven decades of marriage, the Royal husband and wife, then aged 93 and 98 respectively, were able to experience something approaching the shared leisure enjoyed by other elderly couples. (Above, the couple in June 2020 at Windsor Castle)

As a fresh lockdown was announced in December, they were reunited again for what would be their last Christmas together, the Queen making her traditional festive broadcast from Windsor rather than Sandringham. But just months later, she would be facing the loss of her beloved husband only a few weeks short of his 100th birthday. As the country mourned, his death would, she said, leave a 'huge void' in her life. (Above, the Queen at his funeral in April)

As a fresh lockdown was announced in December, they were reunited again for what would be their last Christmas together, the Queen making her traditional festive broadcast from Windsor rather than Sandringham. But just months later, she would be facing the loss of her beloved husband only a few weeks short of his 100th birthday. As the country mourned, his death would, she said, leave a 'huge void' in her life. (Above, the Queen at his funeral in April)

As a fresh lockdown was announced in December, they were reunited again for what would be their last Christmas together, the Queen making her traditional festive broadcast from Windsor rather than Sandringham. But just months later, she would be facing the loss of her beloved husband only a few weeks short of his 100th birthday. As the country mourned, his death would, she said, leave a ‘huge void’ in her life. (Above, the Queen at his funeral in April)

In her long role as Monarch, the Queen has probably trusted fully just three people: her mother, her sister and her husband, a trio to whom she was closer than any of her children or friends.

After the deaths of the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret in 2002, Philip was the sole remaining member of that group. With his loss, the Monarch is arguably more alone than at any time in her long life.

But decades of building her personal strength and resilience through a complete understanding of the isolation at the heart of the role of Monarch has, as I will reveal, prepared her for precisely such a time.

During the celebrations to mark his 90th birthday in 2011, Philip had suggested he was ready to retire. ‘I reckon I’ve done my bit,’ he had said. ‘I want to enjoy myself a bit now, with less responsibility, less frantic rushing about, less trying to think of something to say. It’s better to get out before you reach your sell-by date.’

Always scrupulously fair, Elizabeth recognised that her husband was not, as she was, compelled by Coronation oaths to lifelong service. 

Although he would not actually retire for another six years, a restructuring of Royal roles had already begun gathering pace, led by the Queen’s then private secretary, Sir Christopher Geidt.

In her long role as Monarch, the Queen has probably trusted fully just three people: her mother, her sister and her husband, a trio to whom she was closer than any of her children or friends. After the deaths of the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret in 2002, Philip was the sole remaining member of that group. With his loss, the Monarch is arguably more alone than at any time in her long life. (Above, the Queen and Philip in 2007)

In her long role as Monarch, the Queen has probably trusted fully just three people: her mother, her sister and her husband, a trio to whom she was closer than any of her children or friends. After the deaths of the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret in 2002, Philip was the sole remaining member of that group. With his loss, the Monarch is arguably more alone than at any time in her long life. (Above, the Queen and Philip in 2007)

In her long role as Monarch, the Queen has probably trusted fully just three people: her mother, her sister and her husband, a trio to whom she was closer than any of her children or friends. After the deaths of the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret in 2002, Philip was the sole remaining member of that group. With his loss, the Monarch is arguably more alone than at any time in her long life. (Above, the Queen and Philip in 2007)

The former Army officer, who had replaced her long-time previous private secretary Robin Janvrin in 2007, had quickly won the Monarch’s confidence. Adroitly, he addressed the delicate issue of her increasing age, along with Philip’s imminent reduced role and the Monarchy’s future prospects.

‘When Christopher speaks, you know that that’s how Her Majesty thinks,’ commented former Cabinet Secretary Gus O’Donnell.

A member of the Queen’s staff claimed Geidt had the measure of the Monarch – an instinctive understanding, along with a personal modesty that matched her own.

He took pleasure, Charles’s private secretary Elizabeth Buchanan claimed, chiefly in public recognition of Her Majesty’s ‘extraordinary’ work.

The Queen appreciated his clear-sightedness, ‘almost a sort of surgical capacity of cutting through the mist of details and going to what is the essence of a problem’ in one assessment.

And his reputation for carefully formulated answers to problems expressed in a ‘very short, concise format’, suited the Queen’s own businesslike approach, while his renowned persistence was necessary in strengthening links between Buckingham Palace and Prince Charles’s office at Clarence House.

Like that of the Queen and her son, the relationship between the two Royal offices was not always cosy. Indeed, Charles’s friend, the Duchess of Devonshire, once commented: ‘The trouble lies in the fact that the Queen and Prince Philip and P of W [Prince of Wales] all find it very difficult to talk to each other.’

But encouraged by Geidt, a closer collaboration and task-sharing between Monarch and heir, aimed at smoothing the transition from one reign to the next, was put in place. Government papers were delivered to Charles in green boxes in place of Her Majesty’s red ones.

To the majority of her subjects, the Queen’s scaling-down was imperceptible, exactly as she and Geidt intended.

In 2011, although Philip would not actually retire for another six years, a restructuring of Royal roles had already begun gathering pace, led by the Queen's then private secretary, Sir Christopher Geidt (pictured)

In 2011, although Philip would not actually retire for another six years, a restructuring of Royal roles had already begun gathering pace, led by the Queen's then private secretary, Sir Christopher Geidt (pictured)

In 2011, although Philip would not actually retire for another six years, a restructuring of Royal roles had already begun gathering pace, led by the Queen’s then private secretary, Sir Christopher Geidt (pictured)

It was the Queen herself who in the year of Philip's 90th birthday was forced to have an uncomfortable meeting with her favourite son, Andrew. (Above, in June 2019)

It was the Queen herself who in the year of Philip's 90th birthday was forced to have an uncomfortable meeting with her favourite son, Andrew. (Above, in June 2019)

It was the Queen herself who in the year of Philip’s 90th birthday was forced to have an uncomfortable meeting with her favourite son, Andrew. (Above, in June 2019)

Her cousin Margaret Rhodes referred to her ‘gradually and almost unnoticeably delegating more’, while showing ‘no signs of wilting in the job’.

It was the Queen herself, however, who in the year of Philip’s 90th birthday was forced to have an uncomfortable meeting with her favourite son, Andrew.

In the ten years since his retirement from the Navy in 2001, Andrew’s role as special representative for trade and investment had done ‘a lot of good for the UK’, claimed the then Foreign Secretary, William Hague.

But it had also raised questions about the costs of his extensive travel and the desirability of a number of his personal contacts.

Andrew’s friendship with Jeffrey Epstein ought not to have survived the New York financier’s 2008 conviction for procuring a child for prostitution. Photographs of the two men walking in Central Park in 2010 consolidated an impression of a prince in murky waters: his friends and associates included the son of Libyan leader Colonel Gaddafi.

The Queen did not need to consult Geidt to know that the scandal had the potential to derail the boost to Royal fortunes promised by the wedding the following month of Prince William and Kate Middleton. Geidt knew the extent of Andrew’s expenses and was prepared to take a firm line over his activities. He was also rumoured to oppose any public role for Andrew’s daughters, Beatrice and Eugenie.

Andrew's friendship with Jeffrey Epstein ought not to have survived the New York financier's 2008 conviction for procuring a child for prostitution. Photographs of the two men walking in Central Park in 2010 (above) consolidated an impression of a prince in murky waters: his friends and associates included the son of Libyan leader Colonel Gaddafi

Andrew's friendship with Jeffrey Epstein ought not to have survived the New York financier's 2008 conviction for procuring a child for prostitution. Photographs of the two men walking in Central Park in 2010 (above) consolidated an impression of a prince in murky waters: his friends and associates included the son of Libyan leader Colonel Gaddafi

Andrew’s friendship with Jeffrey Epstein ought not to have survived the New York financier’s 2008 conviction for procuring a child for prostitution. Photographs of the two men walking in Central Park in 2010 (above) consolidated an impression of a prince in murky waters: his friends and associates included the son of Libyan leader Colonel Gaddafi

Despite Government Ministers rallying to Andrew’s cause, in March 2011, BBC Royal Correspondent Peter Hunt described as ‘inevitable’ Andrew’s surrender of his special representative role. That duly happened that summer – although the Epstein saga, as the world now knows, was far from over.

In 2017, the retirement of Prince Philip from public life was announced. The consequences for his wife were immense. But yet again she understood that whatever the pressures imposed by dramatic changes in her personal circumstances, her responsibility to serve was paramount.

She had once told Margaret Rhodes that she would not contemplate abdication ‘unless I get Alzheimer’s or have a stroke’. She also explained to George Carey on his retirement as Archbishop of Canterbury in 2003: ‘That’s something I can’t do. I’m going to carry on to the end.’

From the autumn of 2016, she had been undertaking engagements on her own or supported by other family members, including Princes Charles, William and Harry, and Princess Anne and Sophie Wessex.

Beginning in the year of their 70th wedding anniversary, the couple were now frequently apart, Philip at Wood Farm at Sandringham, in the care of a small staff, while Elizabeth remained at Buckingham Palace or Windsor. She joined him whenever possible and they spoke daily by phone.

In 2017, the retirement of Prince Philip from public life was announced. The consequences for his wife were immense. But yet again she understood that whatever the pressures imposed by dramatic changes in her personal circumstances, her responsibility to serve was paramount. (Above, at the State Opening of Parliament in May)

In 2017, the retirement of Prince Philip from public life was announced. The consequences for his wife were immense. But yet again she understood that whatever the pressures imposed by dramatic changes in her personal circumstances, her responsibility to serve was paramount. (Above, at the State Opening of Parliament in May)

In 2017, the retirement of Prince Philip from public life was announced. The consequences for his wife were immense. But yet again she understood that whatever the pressures imposed by dramatic changes in her personal circumstances, her responsibility to serve was paramount. (Above, at the State Opening of Parliament in May)

But Philip could not carry out long-distance the role of family disciplinarian that had previously relieved his wife of the burden of controlling a large, strong-minded and – in the case of some of its members – status-conscious group of relatives.

Nothing in the Queen’s demeanour suggested self-pity or unhappiness, even as she continued to reign effectively alone. One friend had identified as a characteristic of Her Majesty’s existence ‘the conscious self-sacrifice of any form of private life’.

The Monarch’s habits of self-discipline and duty above all else were sturdily ingrained.

By the autumn of 2017, though, the Queen had every reason to feel herself less well-supported than ever before. Not only was Philip no longer by her side – neither was Geidt. His departure in the summer was a decision the Queen had taken under pressure; among his principal detractors were her sons Charles and Andrew.

It had been Geidt who announced Philip’s decision to retire, addressing 500 Royal employees in the ballroom of Buckingham Palace. In what was described as ‘a rallying address’, Geidt called on staff across the palaces to work together in supporting the Monarch. 

Charles’s staff, however, resented a suggestion by Geidt that Philip’s departure created opportunities for all of the Royal Family: the heir to the throne’s staff’s preference was for an enhanced King-in-waiting role for him. Despite denials, Charles appeared to agree.

Geidt’s resignation, initiated on the Queen’s behalf by her Lord Chamberlain, was put down to Charles’s intervention with his mother, supported by Andrew. The roots of Andrew’s animosity lay in Geidt’s involvement in his loss of his special representative role several years before.

In 2017, the engagement of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle offered a pleasing distraction to a country unsettled by the recent Brexit referendum vote. However, the couple's decision less than two years after their wedding to withdraw from Royal life and relocate to the US was blamed by many on Geidt's replacement, Edward Young

In 2017, the engagement of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle offered a pleasing distraction to a country unsettled by the recent Brexit referendum vote. However, the couple's decision less than two years after their wedding to withdraw from Royal life and relocate to the US was blamed by many on Geidt's replacement, Edward Young

In 2017, the engagement of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle offered a pleasing distraction to a country unsettled by the recent Brexit referendum vote. However, the couple’s decision less than two years after their wedding to withdraw from Royal life and relocate to the US was blamed by many on Geidt’s replacement, Edward Young

Public statements asserted that Geidt’s departure was amicable. The Queen may have taken the decision reluctantly – but she would quickly have grounds to regret it. Newspapers reported that Geidt felt ‘bruised’ by her failure to support him.

For a woman living apart from the husband on whom she was accustomed to rely, 91 was a late age to muster the strength to resist concerted family pressure. Instinctively, the Queen had always avoided confrontation, happier with conciliation than open disagreement. 

Geidt had served her well and may well have anticipated remaining in post until her death. A commentator quoted by Royal writer Robert Lacey blamed Charles and the staff at Clarence House for a ‘shameful… shabby’ decision. Significantly, the Queen’s other two children, Anne and Edward, voiced their unhappiness at what had happened.

Geidt’s place was taken by former deputy private secretary Edward Young. Genial, popular, kindly and committed to the Queen’s best interests, his was a less commanding, less imaginative presence than that of his predecessor.

Later that year, the engagement of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle offered a pleasing distraction to a country unsettled by the recent Brexit referendum vote.

However, the couple’s decision less than two years after their wedding to withdraw from Royal life and relocate to the US was blamed by many on Young. He had failed to evolve a strategy for Harry and Meghan: assumptions were simply made that they would follow a predictable round of Royal duties.

Even though the Queen had invited Meghan to accompany her on a day of engagements, a single trip was not enough to reassure the new Duchess. There were tensions at court and mutual dislike between Young and Meghan.

In the spring of 2019, plans emerged for an overseas role for the couple, masterminded by long-term adviser Sir David Manning and Geidt, who had made a return to court facilitated by the Queen by appointing him to the ceremonial position of permanent lord-in-waiting. But these plans foundered and the couple were released from their Royal duties.

Even though the Queen had invited Meghan to accompany her on a day of engagements, a single trip was not enough to reassure the new Duchess. There were tensions at court and mutual dislike between Young and Meghan

Even though the Queen had invited Meghan to accompany her on a day of engagements, a single trip was not enough to reassure the new Duchess. There were tensions at court and mutual dislike between Young and Meghan

Even though the Queen had invited Meghan to accompany her on a day of engagements, a single trip was not enough to reassure the new Duchess. There were tensions at court and mutual dislike between Young and Meghan

The Queen has never been a sentimental woman; she had acted in the only way she understood.

Throughout a life in which she has consistently honoured her father’s belief that ‘the highest of distinctions is the service of others’, she has placed the Monarchy first, safeguarding its mission of duty that could never, she was certain, be a part-time calling.

With regard to Harry and Meghan, her success was short-lived. The couple’s infamous Oprah Winfrey interview was a very public means of airing grievances they considered unresolved.

Another TV interview had previously added to the Monarch’s worries: the fallout from Andrew’s disastrous BBC1 Panorama appearance. 

Although the Queen played a part in her thick-skinned middle son’s subsequent retirement from public duties and cancelled plans for a 60th birthday party for him, she was criticised for her failure to prevent the interview from taking place.

At the very end of her long reign, at a time when she could most have benefited from a tranquil status quo, family problems were piling up.

Throughout a life in which she has consistently honoured her father's belief that 'the highest of distinctions is the service of others', the Queen has placed the Monarchy first, safeguarding its mission of duty that could never, she was certain, be a part-time calling. With regard to Harry and Meghan, her success was short-lived. The couple's infamous Oprah Winfrey interview was a very public means of airing grievances they considered unresolved

Throughout a life in which she has consistently honoured her father's belief that 'the highest of distinctions is the service of others', the Queen has placed the Monarchy first, safeguarding its mission of duty that could never, she was certain, be a part-time calling. With regard to Harry and Meghan, her success was short-lived. The couple's infamous Oprah Winfrey interview was a very public means of airing grievances they considered unresolved

Throughout a life in which she has consistently honoured her father’s belief that ‘the highest of distinctions is the service of others’, the Queen has placed the Monarchy first, safeguarding its mission of duty that could never, she was certain, be a part-time calling. With regard to Harry and Meghan, her success was short-lived. The couple’s infamous Oprah Winfrey interview was a very public means of airing grievances they considered unresolved

Ultimately, the Monarch’s role is a solitary one: not without reason had the Queen’s father worried that sovereignty would impose on his daughter a lifelong burden of loneliness.

The celebrated Italian painter Pietro Annigoni said, after the Queen had sat for a portrait with him, that he saw her ‘alone in the problems of her responsibility’ and that ‘her devotion to duty and service has led, in my eyes, to great solitude’.

Over recent years, though, the Queen has developed an affectionate bond with her dresser, Angela Kelly, a chirpy, quick-tempered 53-year-old Liverpudlian divorcee. Footage of her helping the Queen with her robes during a sitting for a photograph showed her gently patting her employer’s shoulder.

Kelly occupies a position of trust and intimacy – an occasional source of jealousy within the household. In an interview, Kelly denied that their relationship had become closer following the deaths of Margaret and the Queen Mother, insisting: ‘I am not there to replace her mother and her sister. It’s just a working relationship – but a close one.’

The Queen has placed the same degree of trust in her longest- serving ladies-in-waiting, Mary Morrison and Susan Hussey – the latter accompanied her in her limousine to the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral.

As Her Majesty moves into the remainder of her reign without her beloved consort, many of the problems of the recent past – Harry and Meghan, and Andrew – are still unresolved. So, too, are the various issues surrounding her advisers.

The Queen has placed a degree of trust in her longest- serving ladies-in-waiting, Mary Morrison (above with the Monarch in 2016) and Susan Hussey – the latter accompanied her in her limousine to the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral

The Queen has placed a degree of trust in her longest- serving ladies-in-waiting, Mary Morrison (above with the Monarch in 2016) and Susan Hussey – the latter accompanied her in her limousine to the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral

The Queen has placed a degree of trust in her longest- serving ladies-in-waiting, Mary Morrison (above with the Monarch in 2016) and Susan Hussey – the latter accompanied her in her limousine to the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral

Geidt, now a life peer and the man whose advice she was forced to relinquish, was last month appointed Boris Johnson’s independent adviser on ministerial standards and is therefore not in a position to give her the help she may need.

Very senior members of the Royal Family, meanwhile, are said to have urged the resignation of his replacement, Edward Young, for, in their eyes, failing to ‘hold it together’ for the Monarchy in recent years.

Yet there is little reason to suppose that the Queen will do anything other than carry on as she always has. Indeed, if last week’s State Opening of Parliament, conducted with Charles by her side, is anything to go by, Geidt’s plans for a seamless transition may well be beginning to bear fruit.

Above all, the Queen has been trained from the beginning of her life to cope with deep personal grief. 

As a child she was as close as it is possible to be to her adored grandfather, George V. According to lady-in-waiting Mabell Airlie: ‘Lilibet [the family name for the Queen] always came first [of his grandchildren] in his affections.’

She, in turn, loved the gruff old man. One Christmas, after watching carol-singers perform ‘Glad tidings of great joy I bring to you and all mankind’, Princess Elizabeth, then just two, shouted ‘I know who Old Man Kind is!’ – her much-loved ‘Grandpa England’.

When the King died in 1936, the young Elizabeth was heartbroken. But her grandmother, the stern Queen Mary, insisted that her nine-year-old granddaughter should participate at the lying-in-state with her Royal uncles and her father.

During the burial of her ‘Old Man Kind’ in the gloomy, vaulted enclosure at Windsor, ‘packed with silent and often weeping people’, Elizabeth, clad entirely in black, struggled, according to her governess Marion Crawford.

She was ‘very white… her small face quivered. She did not much like all this,’ Crawford remembered, ‘but she meant to go through with it, making no fuss’.

How often in the future decades would she act in just this way – this child raised in a world in which reserve and self-control were synonyms for good behaviour.

In the months that followed George V’s death, even her wardrobe changed: Elizabeth wore mauve dresses in ‘half-mourning’ colours – the same shade she chose for last week’s State Opening of Parliament.

Margaret Rhodes once suggested that the Queen had inherited her mother’s ability to set aside the unwelcome and the unpalatable. ‘She is very lucky in having a sort of compartmentalised brain, which means that she can switch off from a particular worry, shut the door and carry on in a light-hearted and happy way,’ her cousin said.

After the air-gun shooting incident during the 1981 Trooping the Colour, when the Queen so deftly brought her panicking horse under control, Charles later commented that his mother was ‘made of strong stuff’.

And during the unravelling of Charles and Diana’s marriage in the 1990s, ‘the Queen must have been desperately worried and unhappy’, reflected Lady Kennard, a childhood friend. ‘But you would never know it, because she has this iron self-discipline.’

The Queen will cope. And she will do so using the simple instinct she has honed over many decades: that she was born into a role which leaves her no alternative; a role which history itself has bestowed upon her and from which there is no shirking.

She will cope precisely through her understanding that her role is everything and supersedes all else in her life – even the most profound of personal tragedies.

© Matthew Dennison, 2021

Abridged extract from The Queen, by Matthew Dennison, published by Head of Zeus as an Apollo book on June 3 at £25. To pre-order a copy for £22.25, including free UK delivery, go to mailshop.co.uk/books or call 020 3308 9193 before May 30.

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