Russian defence chiefs release images of ‘space cannon’ missile

Russian defence chiefs have released photographs of a ‘space cannon’ missile designed to protect Soviet military space stations.

Shchit-2 was a Soviet-era missile created to protect the Almaz military space stations from foreign threats.

An example of the missile is currently displayed in a restricted area at NPO Mashinostroyenia, a rocket design bureau based in Reutov, Russia, alongside an earlier version – called the Shchit-1.

The Shchit-1 featured a 23mm cannon and is the only gun to ever be fired in space, reported The Drive, as far as public information suggests.

The Almaz programme was a hidden effort by the Soviets to weaponise their space station – which was just a civilian endeavour as far as the rest of the world was aware.

It was created in the 1960s to conduct intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions and was hidden within the Saylut civilian space station project.

Shchit-2 (pictured) was a Soviet-era missile created to protect the Almaz military space stations from foreign threats

Shchit-2 (pictured) was a Soviet-era missile created to protect the Almaz military space stations from foreign threats

Shchit-2 (pictured) was a Soviet-era missile created to protect the Almaz military space stations from foreign threats

It was only officially declassified in the early 1990s with the fall of the Soviet Union.

But this is the first time examples of the types of weaponry developed by the Soviets have been seen.

There were plans to arm the Almaz stations from the start as its developers feared attacked from American anti-satellite weapons.

And the Shchit-1 system was actually fired in space on January 24, 1975, the station’s last day in orbit.

The results of this test are still classified and the next Almaz station, OPS-3, was launched without any weapons. The next version, OPS-4, which never actually made it to space, was meant to carry the Shchit-2 system. 

There is currently no evidence to suggest the Shchit-2 system ever went to space. 

The projectiles are solid and designed to destroy their targets by sheer force of the impact

The projectiles are solid and designed to destroy their targets by sheer force of the impact

The projectiles are solid and designed to destroy their targets by sheer force of the impact

Leonard Smirichevsky, the current head of NPO Mashinostroyenia, told TV Zvezda the weapon has four major components.

The basis of the system is a solid-fuel rocket motor. This is attached to a spin-stabilisation system that features a rotating wheel with blade-like fins.

There is a radar seeker at the front and a hybrid propulsion-warhead section – which has a circular array of small, grenade-like charges.

The projectiles are solid and designed to destroy their targets by sheer force of the impact.        

‘Upon their ignition, the chambers/grenades might have fed hot propulsive gas into a single or multiple combustion chambers at the center of the contraption, producing either the main thrust and/or steering the vehicle,’ Anatoly Zak wrote on RussianSpaceWeb.com. 

Leonard Smirichevsky (left), the current head of NPO Mashinostroyenia, told TV Zvezda the weapon has four major components

Leonard Smirichevsky (left), the current head of NPO Mashinostroyenia, told TV Zvezda the weapon has four major components

Leonard Smirichevsky (left), the current head of NPO Mashinostroyenia, told TV Zvezda the weapon has four major components

‘When the missile reached the proximity of the target, according to its guiding radar, the entire vehicle would explode and the small solid chambers would eject under their own propulsive force in every direction acting as shrapnel.’

The missile is expected to have a maximum effective range in space of more than 62 miles.

The Almaz OPS-4 station was expected to carry two of these weapons – but it is not known when they were intended to be launched. 

Meanwhile, it is 60 years since Russian pilot and cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human to leave the embrace of planet Earth and venture into space. 

The missile is expected to have a maximum effective range in space of more than 62 miles

The missile is expected to have a maximum effective range in space of more than 62 miles

The missile is expected to have a maximum effective range in space of more than 62 miles

What could be part of a remote control interface of some kind on the outside of the Shchit-2 canister

What could be part of a remote control interface of some kind on the outside of the Shchit-2 canister

What could be part of a remote control interface of some kind on the outside of the Shchit-2 canister

To mark the occasion people, space agencies and governments around the world are celebrating the International Day of Human Space Flight in his honour.  

On April 12, 1961 the 27-year-old Gagarin climbed in his Vostok 1 capsule, ready for the 108 minute flight, shouting ‘Poyekhali!’ – ‘Off we go!’ – as the rockets fired. 

Gagarin launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome where Roscosmos Soyuz flights to the International Space Station (ISS) are still being launched.

French astronaut Thomas Pesquet paid tribute to Gagarin, saying he is a paragon for all astronauts and cosmonauts that have followed in his footsteps.  

Since Gagarin’s flight hundreds of people have flown into space, with most travelling to the International Space Station – only 24 have gone beyond low Earth orbit.       

‘Off we go!’ Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin made history 60 years ago today by becoming the first human in SPACE 

It is 60 years since Russian pilot and cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human to leave the embrace of planet Earth and venture into space. 

To mark the occasion people, space agencies and governments around the world are celebrating the International Day of Human Space Flight in his honour.  

On April 12, 1961 the 27-year-old Gagarin climbed in his Vostok 1 capsule, ready for the 108 minute flight, shouting ‘Poyekhali!’ – ‘Off we go!’ – as the rockets fired. 

Gagarin launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome where Roscosmos Soyuz flights to the International Space Station (ISS) are still being launched.

French astronaut Thomas Pesquet paid tribute to Gagarin, saying he is a paragon for all astronauts and cosmonauts that have followed in his footsteps.  

Since Gagarin’s flight hundreds of people have flown into space, with most travelling to the International Space Station – only 24 have gone beyond low Earth orbit. 

It is 60 years since Russian pilot and cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first person to leave the atmosphere and orbit the planet before returning to Earth

It is 60 years since Russian pilot and cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first person to leave the atmosphere and orbit the planet before returning to Earth

It is 60 years since Russian pilot and cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first person to leave the atmosphere and orbit the planet before returning to Earth

The other anniversary being marked is 40 years since the first NASA Space Shuttle - Columbia - launch on the 20th anniversary of Gagarin's flight on April 12, 1981

The other anniversary being marked is 40 years since the first NASA Space Shuttle - Columbia - launch on the 20th anniversary of Gagarin's flight on April 12, 1981

The other anniversary being marked is 40 years since the first NASA Space Shuttle – Columbia – launch on the 20th anniversary of Gagarin’s flight on April 12, 1981

Gagarin became an international celebrity after his trip to space, travelling the world, giving talks, interviews and signing autographs

Gagarin became an international celebrity after his trip to space, travelling the world, giving talks, interviews and signing autographs

Gagarin became an international celebrity after his trip to space, travelling the world, giving talks, interviews and signing autographs 

The first International Day of Human Space Flight was held in 2011 to mark the 50th anniversary of Gagarin’s orbit and the 30th anniversary of the first NASA Space Shuttle flight – STS-1.

Named Colombia, the shuttle carried two crew, mission commander John W Young and pilot Robert L Crippen.

It would go on to become the workforce of the NASA fleet, but was plagued with problems, including two fatal explosions.

The shuttle program was closed down in July 2011, after 135 missions including those to the ISS and to launch and repair the Hubble Space Telescope.

The missions included the catastrophic failures of Challenger in 1986 and Columbia in 2003 that killed a total of 14 astronauts. 

Gagarin died in 1968, aged 34, a year before Neil Armstrong became the first human to walk on the surface of the moon. 

 ‘Orbiting Earth in the spaceship, I saw how beautiful our planet is. People, let us preserve and increase this beauty, not destroy it!,’ Gagarin said of Earth from space during his solo orbit.

Gagarin was flown to Moscow to a hero’s welcome, hailed by Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev and greeted by enthusiastic crowds cheering his flight as a triumph on par with the victory in World War II. 

In the years before he died at age 34, he basked in international glory, visiting dozens of countries to celebrate his historic mission.

‘The colossal propaganda effect of the Sputnik launch and particularly Gagarin’s flight was very important,’ Moscow-based aviation and space expert Vadim Lukashevich said.  

The successful one-orbit flight on April 12, 1961 made the 27-year-old Gagarin a national hero and cemented Soviet supremacy in space until the United States put a man on the moon more than eight years later

The successful one-orbit flight on April 12, 1961 made the 27-year-old Gagarin a national hero and cemented Soviet supremacy in space until the United States put a man on the moon more than eight years later

The successful one-orbit flight on April 12, 1961 made the 27-year-old Gagarin a national hero and cemented Soviet supremacy in space until the United States put a man on the moon more than eight years later

‘We suddenly beat America even though our country hadn’t recovered yet from the massive damage and casualties’ from World War II.

Gagarin only went to space once, although did serve as a backup crew for the first Soyuz mission in 1967 that saw cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov killed when it crashed into he ground after a parachute failure during its return to Earth. 

Fearing for the life of a man that had become a national icon, Soviet officials banned Gagarin from further spaceflight after the Soyuz failure. 

He died when a training jet he was piloting crashed near the town of Kirzhach five weeks after he completed training at the Zhukovsky Air Force engineering Academy. 

In the Soviet Union April 12 was marked as Cosmonautics Day, first observed in 1963 and still observed in modern Russia and some former Soviet states.

People have taken to social media to pay tribute to Gagarin, describing him as an example for all space travellers to follow.

Space agencies and governments have tweeted to show support for the International Day of Human Spaceflight, marking 60 years since Gagarin's first flight

Space agencies and governments have tweeted to show support for the International Day of Human Spaceflight, marking 60 years since Gagarin's first flight

Space agencies and governments have tweeted to show support for the International Day of Human Spaceflight, marking 60 years since Gagarin’s first flight

Pesquet said: ‘I’ve been thinking about him for hours before the launch of our ‘Soyuz’ spaceship back in 2016. It was a great honour for me to walk Yuri Gagarin’s path at Baikonur Cosmodrome.’

The European Space Agency, the UN, the Australian Space Agency and others shared details of Gagarin’s flight to mark the 60th anniversary.

The first human space flight, and the first human made object – Sputnik – being put into orbit were the major sparks that kicked off the space race.

Gagarin travelled around the Earth in a 108 minute flight that saw him orbit the planet once. He shouted 'Pokeyhali' or 'Let's Go' as the rockets roared beneath him

Gagarin travelled around the Earth in a 108 minute flight that saw him orbit the planet once. He shouted 'Pokeyhali' or 'Let's Go' as the rockets roared beneath him

Gagarin travelled around the Earth in a 108 minute flight that saw him orbit the planet once. He shouted ‘Pokeyhali’ or ‘Let’s Go’ as the rockets roared beneath him

The space race was a 20th-century competition between two super powers – the capitalist US and the communist Soviet Union.

Each super power waged a bitter campaign to prove the superiority of their space technology in a race that became symbolic of the Cold War era.

The race began in 1957 when a Russian ballistic missile launched the world’s first ever man-made satellite to enter Earth’s orbit, known as ‘Sputnik’.

Sputnik’s launch took US military officials by surprise and in 1958 NASA was created to take on the Russians’ space superiority.

But in 1961, the Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first person to orbit Earth, traveling in the capsule-like spacecraft Vostok 1 – the US were still second in the space race.

Later that year, then-President John F. Kennedy made the bold claim that the US would land a man on the moon by the end of the decade, and NASA’s budget was hiked by more than 500 per cent over the next four years.

NASA met Kennedy’s lofty target in July 1969 when US astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin and Michael Collins set off on the Apollo 11 space mission.

Gagarin only went to space once, although did serve as a backup crew for the first Soyuz mission in 1967 that saw cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov killed when it crashed into he ground after a parachute failure during its return to Earth

Gagarin only went to space once, although did serve as a backup crew for the first Soyuz mission in 1967 that saw cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov killed when it crashed into he ground after a parachute failure during its return to Earth

Gagarin only went to space once, although did serve as a backup crew for the first Soyuz mission in 1967 that saw cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov killed when it crashed into he ground after a parachute failure during its return to Earth

Fearing for the life of a man that had become a national icon, Soviet officials banned Gagarin from further spaceflight after the Soyuz failure

Fearing for the life of a man that had become a national icon, Soviet officials banned Gagarin from further spaceflight after the Soyuz failure

Fearing for the life of a man that had become a national icon, Soviet officials banned Gagarin from further spaceflight after the Soyuz failure

Since Gagarin's flight hundreds of people have flown into space, with most travelling to the International Space Station - only 24 have gone beyond low Earth orbit

Since Gagarin's flight hundreds of people have flown into space, with most travelling to the International Space Station - only 24 have gone beyond low Earth orbit

Since Gagarin’s flight hundreds of people have flown into space, with most travelling to the International Space Station – only 24 have gone beyond low Earth orbit

In the Soviet Union April 12, the day of Gagarin's (pictured) flight was marked as Cosmonautics Day, first observed in 1963 and still observed in modern Russia and some former Soviet states

In the Soviet Union April 12, the day of Gagarin's (pictured) flight was marked as Cosmonautics Day, first observed in 1963 and still observed in modern Russia and some former Soviet states

In the Soviet Union April 12, the day of Gagarin’s (pictured) flight was marked as Cosmonautics Day, first observed in 1963 and still observed in modern Russia and some former Soviet states

Armstrong would go on to become the first man on the moon – effectively ending the Cold War.

To mark the 60th anniversary of Gagarin’s first flight, Russia’s state controlled international television network, RT, has digitally restore the speech he gave a year after his trip to space.

They used neural networks and machine learning to restore, add colour and refresh the imagery and audio from archive frames recorded on 35mm film.

‘Dear friends! Today is the day of the first anniversary of the first manned flight into space in the history of mankind, ‘says Gagarin in his speech.

He noted that the flight of the Soviet spaceship ‘Vostok-1’ opened not only a new faith in space exploration, but also ‘was a messenger of peace and goodwill’ to all the people on Earth.

Since the days of the space race, travel has been restricted primarily to low Earth orbit, including trips to various space stations, including the ISS.

To date 553 people have travelled to space from 37 countries with just 24 going beyond low Earth orbit. 

People from the US make up 61% of all space travellers or 339 people, followed by Russia at 21% or 121 people. 

The next highest number of travellers from a single country is Japan at 12 people, or 2% of all people that have journeyed into space. 

Yuri Night, also known as the ‘World Space Party’ is an international even observed since 2011 and this year will stream live on YouTube for free. 

Next year it will be 50 years since the last humans went further than low Earth orbit, when the NASA Apollo 17 crew landed on the moon.

The next time astronauts will leave low Earth orbit is expected to happen in 2023 when a crew on Artemis II will orbit the moon.

The year after Artemis III will take the first woman and the next man to land on the surface of the moon for the first time since 1972.

Going forward the first humans to land on another planet is expected to happen in 2035, when an extended Artemis mission will land on Mars.

 

In a video produced by RT, Gagarin's first anniversary speech has been restored and colourised

In a video produced by RT, Gagarin's first anniversary speech has been restored and colourised

In a video produced by RT, Gagarin’s first anniversary speech has been restored and colourised

It could happen before then if Elon Musk gets the SpaceX Starship spacecraft ready for a proposed crewed Mars trip in 2026. 

The most recent flight to space saw NASA’s Mark Vande Hei, Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskly and Flight Engineer Pyotr Dubrov of Roscosmos travel in a Soyuz capsule to the ISS, 254 miles above the Earth.

Richard Branson, Founder of Virgin Galactic said he has dreamed of experiencing the view of Earth from space – as first seen by Yuri Gagarin – since he was a child watching the moon landings.

‘Today, we celebrate International Day of Human Spaceflight with the commercial space industry on the cusp of turning my dream, and thousands of others, into a reality by regularly flying private astronauts into space. 

‘This is the dawn of a new space age and I feel even more passionate about the future of space travel now than I did when Neil Armstrong first walked on the moon.’

Chris Hadfield, former Canadian astronaut and Virgin Galactic advisor said spaceflight is hard and magnificent, an achievement ‘worthy of recognition.’ 

‘April 12 is the 60th anniversary of an immensely brave man who forged our way into the unknown, Yuri Gagarin, and I respect and honor him for it. 

‘Every astronaut since then, from Al Shepard to the international Soyuz crew that launched to the space station last week, has followed in Yuri’s footsteps.’

With the rise in commercial space travel, from firms like Virgin Galactic, the number of people recognised as astronauts will increase exponentially.

‘I’m glad that all those who complete a spaceflight with Virgin Galactic will also be recognized by the Association of Space Explorers,’ said Virgin Galactic Chief Astronaut Instructor Beth Moses. 

‘It’s an honor to be recognized by an organization which counts so many pioneers of space exploration among its members. ‘I’m looking forward to working with them to continue to inspire and educate people around the advantages of seeing the world’s problems from the perspective of space.’  

<!—->

Advertisement

Link hienalouca.com

(Total views: 4 Time, 1 visits per day)

Leave a Reply