Prince Philip funeral: Queen carried Duke’s handkerchief and photo of them as newlyweds

The Queen kept her husband poignantly close during the service by carrying special mementoes from their life together inside her handbag.

According to a Royal insider, the Queen was planning to include one of Philip‘s trademark white handkerchiefs, made by his Savile Row tailors Kent & Haste. The crisply folded squares, inserted into the breast pocket of a sharply cut suit, were an enduring feature of the Duke’s classic sartorial style.

In honour of their long marriage, she is also said to have carried a small photograph of the two of them together, thought to have been taken in Malta. 

The island was a deeply special place for both the Queen and Philip. As newlyweds they lived in Villa Guardamangia, on the outskirts of the capital Valletta, between 1949 and 1951, while the Prince was stationed there as a naval officer with HMS Magpie.

The Queen later described it as one of the best periods of her life as it was the only time she was able to live ‘normally’. The couple returned often, including to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary in 2007.

As is her custom, the Queen’s handbag was by British brand Launer, which has held a Royal Warrant since 1968. She is understood to own around 200 of the bags, in different styles and colours to match her outfits.

They have long also been used to carry precious objects including, reportedly, a collection of good luck charms given to her by her children and grandchildren. But perhaps none will be more significant, nor more heartfelt, than those she carried to bid her husband goodbye.

During her husband’s Covid-secure Windsor Castle funeral, the grief-stricken monarch left a personal, handwritten message to Philip placed alongside a wreath of white lilies, small white roses and white freesia chosen by her.

Photos from this afternoon show only a glimpse of the note, which appears to be written on official card from Buckingham Palace. However, the Palace has not yet confirmed the content of the note. 

The note appears to have been her parting gift from Her Majesty to her husband of 73 years, for whom she was forced to mourn away from her family in St George’s Chapel as she said goodbye to her ‘strength and stay’. 

She also brought out the diamond Richmond Brooch, a present from the town of Richmond for her grandmother Queen Mary’s 1893 wedding to the future King George V which she inherited, for the ceremony. 

During the service, the Queen wiped away tears and bowed her head in reverence as she accompanied her husband’s coffin on its final journey while their eldest son Prince Charles cried as he walked behind the casket into church followed by other devastated royals.  

As the world said goodbye to Prince Philip, it also emerged:

  • The Queen sat alone having wiped her eyes as she followed her husband’s final journey with his coffin borne on the back of a Land Rover hearse he had designed himself 20 years ago; 
  • Prince Harry and Prince William saw each other for the first time in a year after falling out over Megxit. They didn’t utter a word on the walk to church but spoke after the service with the Duchess of Cambridge walking with them. Kate was wearing  a diamond and pearl necklace from the Queen’s personal collection;
  • Harry and William’s father Prince Charles appeared to be crying throughout his walk to church and the emotional service; 
  • Philip’s funeral service began with a national minute’s silence in a service reflecting his ‘unwavering loyalty’ to Queen and country, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby praised Philip’s ‘life of service to the nation and Commonwealth’ at the service; 
  • Meghan Markle left a handwritten card on a wreath for Philip that was left for at St George’s Chapel on the day of his funeral. Her friend Omid Scobie said ‘it’s a sad day for her’ and that her mind is ‘very much’ on Prince Philip’s funeral;
  • Prince Andrew seen leaving Windsor Castle in aviator shades not long after the end of the funeral following row over his wish to dress as an Admiral; 

Alone in grief, the Queen sat on the opposite side of the church as she says goodbye to her husband at his funeral in extraordinary and poignant circumstances due to the pandemic

Alone in grief, the Queen sat on the opposite side of the church as she says goodbye to her husband at his funeral in extraordinary and poignant circumstances due to the pandemic

Alone in grief, the Queen sat on the opposite side of the church as she says goodbye to her husband at his funeral in extraordinary and poignant circumstances due to the pandemic

A picture of the then Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip during their 1947 honeymoon in Malta, where the Duke of Edinburgh was then stationed with the Royal Navy. There is no suggestion the Queen kept this photo with her during the funeral

A picture of the then Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip during their 1947 honeymoon in Malta, where the Duke of Edinburgh was then stationed with the Royal Navy. There is no suggestion the Queen kept this photo with her during the funeral

A picture of the then Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip during their 1947 honeymoon in Malta, where the Duke of Edinburgh was then stationed with the Royal Navy. There is no suggestion the Queen kept this photo with her during the funeral

The Queen and Prince Philip attending a gala performance of Our Extraordinary World at The Royal Opera House on October 30, 2012 in London. The Duke is pictured with a pocket square. There is no suggestion she kept this pocket square on her

The Queen and Prince Philip attending a gala performance of Our Extraordinary World at The Royal Opera House on October 30, 2012 in London. The Duke is pictured with a pocket square. There is no suggestion she kept this pocket square on her

The Queen and Prince Philip attending a gala performance of Our Extraordinary World at The Royal Opera House on October 30, 2012 in London. The Duke is pictured with a pocket square. There is no suggestion she kept this pocket square on her

The Queen is conducted by the Dean of Windsor into the Quire of St George's Chapel in Windsor Castle

The Queen is conducted by the Dean of Windsor into the Quire of St George's Chapel in Windsor Castle

The Queen is conducted by the Dean of Windsor into the Quire of St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle

The Queen stands alone as she watches Prince Philip's coffin being carried by soldiers on its final journey into St George's Chapel, Windsor today for the funeral of her beloved husband

The Queen stands alone as she watches Prince Philip's coffin being carried by soldiers on its final journey into St George's Chapel, Windsor today for the funeral of her beloved husband

The Queen stands alone as she watches Prince Philip’s coffin being carried by soldiers on its final journey into St George’s Chapel, Windsor today for the funeral of her beloved husband

Her Majesty then put on her spectacles as she sat alone and looked towards the altar during the poignant service

Her Majesty then put on her spectacles as she sat alone and looked towards the altar during the poignant service

Her Majesty then put on her spectacles as she sat alone and looked towards the altar during the poignant service

Philip's coffin had his standard, navy cap and a sword given to him by the Queen's father when they married 73 years ago as the Queen sat alone on the left as it was placed ahead of the altar

Philip's coffin had his standard, navy cap and a sword given to him by the Queen's father when they married 73 years ago as the Queen sat alone on the left as it was placed ahead of the altar

Philip’s coffin had his standard, navy cap and a sword given to him by the Queen’s father when they married 73 years ago as the Queen sat alone on the left as it was placed ahead of the altar

The Queen is greeted by the Right Reverend David Conner, Dean of Windsor, as she arrives at St George's Chapel followed by Camilla and Kate

The Queen is greeted by the Right Reverend David Conner, Dean of Windsor, as she arrives at St George's Chapel followed by Camilla and Kate

The Queen is greeted by the Right Reverend David Conner, Dean of Windsor, as she arrives at St George’s Chapel followed by Camilla and Kate

The emotional Queen wipes away a tear in the back of the royal Bentley as she saw the procession

The emotional Queen wipes away a tear in the back of the royal Bentley as she saw the procession

The emotional Queen wipes away a tear in the back of the royal Bentley as she saw the procession

The Duchess of Cambridge and the Duke of Cambridge look towards Philip's coffin before it was lowered into the Royal Vault

The Duchess of Cambridge and the Duke of Cambridge look towards Philip's coffin before it was lowered into the Royal Vault

The Duchess of Cambridge and the Duke of Cambridge look towards Philip’s coffin before it was lowered into the Royal Vault

William and Kate bow their heads and clasp their heads in prayer during the service

William and Kate bow their heads and clasp their heads in prayer during the service

William and Kate bow their heads and clasp their heads in prayer during the service

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, James, Viscount Severn and Sophie, Countess of Wessex listen to the service

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, James, Viscount Severn and Sophie, Countess of Wessex listen to the service

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, James, Viscount Severn and Sophie, Countess of Wessex listen to the service

Prince Harry was sat directly across from his older brother and his wife Kate having flown in without his wife Meghan

Prince Harry was sat directly across from his older brother and his wife Kate having flown in without his wife Meghan

Prince Harry was sat directly across from his older brother and his wife Kate having flown in without his wife Meghan

(top row, left to right) Zara and Mike Tindall, Jack Brooksbank, Princess Eugenie, Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi and Princess Eugenie, (front row, left to right) the Duchess of Cambridge, the Duke of Cambridge, the Earl of Wessex, James Viscount Severn, the Countess of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor, the Duchess of Cornwall and the Prince of Wales during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

(top row, left to right) Zara and Mike Tindall, Jack Brooksbank, Princess Eugenie, Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi and Princess Eugenie, (front row, left to right) the Duchess of Cambridge, the Duke of Cambridge, the Earl of Wessex, James Viscount Severn, the Countess of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor, the Duchess of Cornwall and the Prince of Wales during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

(top row, left to right) Zara and Mike Tindall, Jack Brooksbank, Princess Eugenie, Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi and Princess Eugenie, (front row, left to right) the Duchess of Cambridge, the Duke of Cambridge, the Earl of Wessex, James Viscount Severn, the Countess of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor, the Duchess of Cornwall and the Prince of Wales during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

Viscount Severn, (L), Sophie, Countess of Wessex (C) and Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor sit together in chapel waiting for Prince Edward to sit with them

Viscount Severn, (L), Sophie, Countess of Wessex (C) and Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor sit together in chapel waiting for Prince Edward to sit with them

Viscount Severn, (L), Sophie, Countess of Wessex (C) and Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor sit together in chapel waiting for Prince Edward to sit with them

Princess Eugenie of York (R) and her husband Jack Brooksbank sit quietly together with their hands clasped

Princess Eugenie of York (R) and her husband Jack Brooksbank sit quietly together with their hands clasped

Princess Eugenie of York (R) and her husband Jack Brooksbank sit quietly together with their hands clasped

The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby praised the extraordinary life of the Duke of Edinburgh

The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby praised the extraordinary life of the Duke of Edinburgh

The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby praised the extraordinary life of the Duke of Edinburgh

Her Majesty's head remained bowed throughout the heartbreaking journey to the church

Her Majesty's head remained bowed throughout the heartbreaking journey to the church

Her Majesty's head remained bowed throughout the heartbreaking journey to the church

Her Majesty's head remained bowed throughout the heartbreaking journey to the church

Her Majesty’s head remained bowed throughout the heartbreaking walk from the car to the church

Her Majesty, with tears in her eyes, looks on after she had a moment of quiet reflection by her husband's coffin

Her Majesty, with tears in her eyes, looks on after she had a moment of quiet reflection by her husband's coffin

Her Majesty, with tears in her eyes, looks on after she had a moment of quiet reflection by her husband’s coffin

The Queen's  Bentley followed the coffin from the castle to the church, behind the Land Rover and her family marching together

The Queen's  Bentley followed the coffin from the castle to the church, behind the Land Rover and her family marching together

The Queen’s  Bentley followed the coffin from the castle to the church, behind the Land Rover and her family marching together

Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince Andrew, Duke of York, Princess Anne, Princess Royal, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones, Peter Phillips, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence prepare to set off from the castle behind the coffin

Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince Andrew, Duke of York, Princess Anne, Princess Royal, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones, Peter Phillips, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence prepare to set off from the castle behind the coffin

Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince Andrew, Duke of York, Princess Anne, Princess Royal, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones, Peter Phillips, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence prepare to set off from the castle behind the coffin

Princess Anne, Princess Royal, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince Andrew, Duke of York, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Peter Phillips, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence follow Prince Philip

Princess Anne, Princess Royal, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince Andrew, Duke of York, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Peter Phillips, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence follow Prince Philip

Princess Anne, Princess Royal, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince Andrew, Duke of York, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Peter Phillips, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence follow Prince Philip

rincess Anne, Princess Royal, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince Andrew, Duke of York, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Peter Phillips, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence follow Prince Philip down from the castle to the chapel

rincess Anne, Princess Royal, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince Andrew, Duke of York, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Peter Phillips, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence follow Prince Philip down from the castle to the chapel

rincess Anne, Princess Royal, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince Andrew, Duke of York, Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Peter Phillips, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence follow Prince Philip down from the castle to the chapel

Members of the Royal family march behind the coffin during the ceremonial funeral procession of Britain's Prince Philip

Members of the Royal family march behind the coffin during the ceremonial funeral procession of Britain's Prince Philip

Members of the Royal family march behind the coffin during the ceremonial funeral procession of Britain’s Prince Philip

The Duke of Edinburgh's coffin, covered with His Royal Highness's Personal Standard is carried to the purpose built Land Rover

The Duke of Edinburgh's coffin, covered with His Royal Highness's Personal Standard is carried to the purpose built Land Rover

The Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin, covered with His Royal Highness’s Personal Standard is carried to the purpose built Land Rover

The Queen walked from the church with Dean David Connor after the emotional state occasion

The Queen walked from the church with Dean David Connor after the emotional state occasion

The Queen walked from the church with Dean David Connor after the emotional state occasion

Harry and William walked back to the castle in the spring sunshine with Kate, speaking for the first time in a year

Harry and William walked back to the castle in the spring sunshine with Kate, speaking for the first time in a year

Harry and William walked back to the castle in the spring sunshine with Kate, speaking for the first time in a year

The brothers then moved ahead of a group including Kate and Sophie Wessex as experts said they hoped the brothers would rebuilt their relationship

The brothers then moved ahead of a group including Kate and Sophie Wessex as experts said they hoped the brothers would rebuilt their relationship

The brothers then moved ahead of a group including Kate and Sophie Wessex as experts said they hoped the brothers would rebuilt their relationship

After the service, Kate walked out with her husband and Prince Harry, before chatting to the Duke of Sussex

After the service, Kate walked out with her husband and Prince Harry, before chatting to the Duke of Sussex

After the service, Kate walked out with her husband and Prince Harry, before chatting to the Duke of Sussex

A tear rolled down Prince Charles' cheek as he walked behind his father Prince Philip's coffin at Windsor Castle

A tear rolled down Prince Charles' cheek as he walked behind his father Prince Philip's coffin at Windsor Castle

A tear rolled down Prince Charles’ cheek as he walked behind his father Prince Philip’s coffin at Windsor Castle

A tearful Prince Charles watches as his father's body is carried to the altar, as he is supported by his wife Camilla

A tearful Prince Charles watches as his father's body is carried to the altar, as he is supported by his wife Camilla

A tearful Prince Charles watches as his father’s body is carried to the altar, as he is supported by his wife Camilla

Prince Harry, pictured on the far right, looks towards his grandmother on a row also occupied by Princess Anne and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence and Prince Andrew

Prince Harry, pictured on the far right, looks towards his grandmother on a row also occupied by Princess Anne and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence and Prince Andrew

Prince Harry, pictured on the far right, looks towards his grandmother on a row also occupied by Princess Anne and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence and Prince Andrew

Prince Andrew also sat alone as his children were sat with their husbands and Sarah Ferguson was not invited

Prince Andrew also sat alone as his children were sat with their husbands and Sarah Ferguson was not invited

Prince Andrew also sat alone as his children were sat with their husbands and Sarah Ferguson was not invited

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II takes her seat alone in the quire of St. George's Chapel

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II takes her seat alone in the quire of St. George's Chapel

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II takes her seat alone in the quire of St. George’s Chapel

Her Majesty stands alone, head bowed, in the chapel as her husband's coffin was carried into the church to be laid to rest

Her Majesty stands alone, head bowed, in the chapel as her husband's coffin was carried into the church to be laid to rest

Her Majesty wore glasses as she read the order of service on an emotional day for the royals

Her Majesty wore glasses as she read the order of service on an emotional day for the royals

Her Majesty stands alone, head bowed, in the chapel as her husband’s coffin was carried into the church to be laid to rest

The Buglers of the Royal Marines play the Last Post after Philip's coffin was lowered into the Royal Vault

The Buglers of the Royal Marines play the Last Post after Philip's coffin was lowered into the Royal Vault

The Buglers of the Royal Marines play the Last Post after Philip’s coffin was lowered into the Royal Vault

The Earl of Wessex, James Viscount Severn, The Countess of Wessex and Lady Louise Windsor during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George's Chapel

The Earl of Wessex, James Viscount Severn, The Countess of Wessex and Lady Louise Windsor during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George's Chapel

The Earl of Wessex, James Viscount Severn, The Countess of Wessex and Lady Louise Windsor during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George’s Chapel

Mike and Zara Tindall also looked in tears as the couple bowed their heads during the funeral

Mike and Zara Tindall also looked in tears as the couple bowed their heads during the funeral

Mike and Zara Tindall also looked in tears as the couple bowed their heads during the funeral

Princess Beatrice and spouse Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi were also present inside the chapel for Prince Philip's funeral service with Beatrice looking tearful

Princess Beatrice and spouse Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi were also present inside the chapel for Prince Philip's funeral service with Beatrice looking tearful

Princess Beatrice and spouse Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi were also present inside the chapel for Prince Philip’s funeral service with Beatrice looking tearful

Prince Philip's coffin, draped in his personal standard, stands alone with his heartbroken wife to its left and only 30 guests inside

Prince Philip's coffin, draped in his personal standard, stands alone with his heartbroken wife to its left and only 30 guests inside

Prince Philip’s coffin, draped in his personal standard, stands alone with his heartbroken wife to its left and only 30 guests inside

Prince Charles blinks away tears as he follows the coffin into the church with his brothers behind him

Prince Charles blinks away tears as he follows the coffin into the church with his brothers behind him

Prince Charles blinks away tears as he follows the coffin into the church with his brothers behind him

Pall Bearers carrying the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh enter St George's Chapel followed by members of the royal family

Pall Bearers carrying the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh enter St George's Chapel followed by members of the royal family

Pall Bearers carrying the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh enter St George’s Chapel followed by members of the royal family

Prince Charles and Princess Anne watch the coffin as it it lifted into place

Prince Charles and Princess Anne watch the coffin as it it lifted into place

Prince Charles and Princess Anne watch the coffin as it it lifted into place 

Queen Elizabeth II (top right) and the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby watch as the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin is placed

Queen Elizabeth II (top right) and the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby watch as the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin is placed

Queen Elizabeth II (top right) and the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby watch as the Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin is placed

The masked soldiers who carried the lead-lined coffin carrying Philip gently lift it into place in front of the Queen

The masked soldiers who carried the lead-lined coffin carrying Philip gently lift it into place in front of the Queen

The masked soldiers who carried the lead-lined coffin carrying Philip gently lift it into place in front of the Queen

The royals all sat in their own household bubbles with Prince Charles and Camilla closest to the coffin. Then it was the Wessexes, the Cambridges in the front row. Then it was Beatrice, Eugenie, the Tindalls on the back row

The royals all sat in their own household bubbles with Prince Charles and Camilla closest to the coffin. Then it was the Wessexes, the Cambridges in the front row. Then it was Beatrice, Eugenie, the Tindalls on the back row

The royals all sat in their own household bubbles with Prince Charles and Camilla closest to the coffin. Then it was the Wessexes, the Cambridges in the front row. Then it was Beatrice, Eugenie, the Tindalls on the back row

Catherine appeared to be fighting back tears as she waited inside the chapel alone, before the arrival of her husband

Catherine appeared to be fighting back tears as she waited inside the chapel alone, before the arrival of her husband

Catherine appeared to be fighting back tears as she waited inside the chapel alone, before the arrival of her husband 

The view of the coffin from the very top of the church during the emotional state occasion

The view of the coffin from the very top of the church during the emotional state occasion

The view of the coffin from the very top of the church during the emotional state occasion

St George’s Chapel, the scene of Harry and Meghan’s wedding and other happier occasions, contained only 30 guests for the Duke’s funeral

The Duke of Edinburgh's coffin, covered with his Personal Standard, is carried into St George's Chapel

The Duke of Edinburgh's coffin, covered with his Personal Standard, is carried into St George's Chapel

The Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin, covered with his Personal Standard, is carried into St George’s Chapel

The coffin is carried into St George's chapel, as royal family members look on from the bottom of the steps during the procession

The coffin is carried into St George's chapel, as royal family members look on from the bottom of the steps during the procession

The coffin is carried into St George’s chapel, as royal family members look on from the bottom of the steps during the procession

Pallbearers carry the lead-lined coffin up the steps into the chapel watched by dozens of soldiers

Pallbearers carry the lead-lined coffin up the steps into the chapel watched by dozens of soldiers

Pallbearers carry the lead-lined coffin up the steps into the chapel watched by dozens of soldiers

The Royal Family stand at the bottom of the steps of St George's Chapel as the coffin is carried up into the church

The Royal Family stand at the bottom of the steps of St George's Chapel as the coffin is carried up into the church

The Royal Family stand at the bottom of the steps of St George’s Chapel as the coffin is carried up into the church

Guardsmen, staff and members of the Royal Household stand by beside St George's Chapel at the start of the funeral service

Guardsmen, staff and members of the Royal Household stand by beside St George's Chapel at the start of the funeral service

Guardsmen, staff and members of the Royal Household stand by beside St George’s Chapel at the start of the funeral service

Members of the Household Cavalry lined the route of the ceremonial procession and lowered their heads as the coffin passed them

Members of the Household Cavalry lined the route of the ceremonial procession and lowered their heads as the coffin passed them

Members of the Household Cavalry lined the route of the ceremonial procession and lowered their heads as the coffin passed them

Members of the military stand for a minutes' silence before the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

Members of the military stand for a minutes' silence before the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

Members of the military stand for a minutes’ silence before the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

Prince Philip had links to 42 regiments before he died on April 9 aged 99

Prince Philip had links to 42 regiments before he died on April 9 aged 99

Prince Philip had links to 42 regiments before he died on April 9 aged 99

Sophie, the Countess of Wessex, center, Lady Louise Windsor, and James, Viscount Severn watch the procession, as Prince Charles and Princess Anne walk past, from the Galilee Porch of St George's Chapel

Sophie, the Countess of Wessex, center, Lady Louise Windsor, and James, Viscount Severn watch the procession, as Prince Charles and Princess Anne walk past, from the Galilee Porch of St George's Chapel

Sophie, the Countess of Wessex, center, Lady Louise Windsor, and James, Viscount Severn watch the procession, as Prince Charles and Princess Anne walk past, from the Galilee Porch of St George’s Chapel

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex holds his mask as he follows The Duke of Edinburgh's coffin into St George's Chapel

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex holds his mask as he follows The Duke of Edinburgh's coffin into St George's Chapel

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex holds his mask as he follows The Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin into St George’s Chapel

Once outside the chapel, the Duchess wore a long buttoned coat over her Roland Mouret dress

Once outside the chapel, the Duchess wore a long buttoned coat over her Roland Mouret dress

Kate was impeccably dressed for the occasion and once outside the chapel, the Duchess wore a long buttoned coat over her Roland Mouret dress

The Queen leaves St George's Chapel after the emotional funeral of her husband Prince Philip

The Queen leaves St George's Chapel after the emotional funeral of her husband Prince Philip

The Queen leaves St George’s Chapel after the emotional funeral of her husband Prince Philip

Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, looks emotional as she leaves the funeral at Windsor this afternoon

Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, looks emotional as she leaves the funeral at Windsor this afternoon

Britain’s Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, looks emotional as she leaves the funeral at Windsor this afternoon

Zara Tindall, Mike Tindall, Princess Eugenie, Jack Brooksbank, Princess Beatrice and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi watch the procession at the Galilee Porch of St George's Chapel

Zara Tindall, Mike Tindall, Princess Eugenie, Jack Brooksbank, Princess Beatrice and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi watch the procession at the Galilee Porch of St George's Chapel

Zara Tindall, Mike Tindall, Princess Eugenie, Jack Brooksbank, Princess Beatrice and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi watch the procession at the Galilee Porch of St George’s Chapel

Prince Philip's cap and sword atop the coffin as it was carried on the Land Rover hearse he helped design

Prince Philip's cap and sword atop the coffin as it was carried on the Land Rover hearse he helped design

Prince Philip’s cap and sword atop the coffin as it was carried on the Land Rover hearse he helped design

The Queen wipes a tear from her eyes as she arrives behind her husband's coffin as Prince Philip's funeral began this afternoon

The Queen wipes a tear from her eyes as she arrives behind her husband's coffin as Prince Philip's funeral began this afternoon

The Queen wipes a tear from her eyes as she arrives behind her husband’s coffin as Prince Philip’s funeral began this afternoon

Queen Elizabeth II looks at the coffin of Prince Philip as she began life without him aged 94

Queen Elizabeth II looks at the coffin of Prince Philip as she began life without him aged 94

Queen Elizabeth II looks at the coffin of Prince Philip as she began life without him aged 94

Prince Charles looked grief stricken as he followed his father on the final journey to church

Prince Charles looked grief stricken as he followed his father on the final journey to church

Prince Charles looked grief stricken as he followed his father on the final journey to church

The modified Land Rover hearse carries the coffin as members of the Royal Family follow behind

The modified Land Rover hearse carries the coffin as members of the Royal Family follow behind

The modified Land Rover hearse carries the coffin as members of the Royal Family follow behind

Prince Charles looks at his father's hearse followed by his siblings sons and other royals

Prince Charles looks at his father's hearse followed by his siblings sons and other royals

Prince Charles looks at his father’s hearse followed by his siblings sons and other royals

William and Harry saw each other for the first time in a year as they walked with the coffin into the church

William and Harry saw each other for the first time in a year as they walked with the coffin into the church

William and Harry saw each other for the first time in a year as they walked with the coffin into the church

Harry left his wife Meghan at home because they are expecting their second child

Harry left his wife Meghan at home because they are expecting their second child

Harry left his wife Meghan at home because they are expecting their second child

The Queen walked alone into the church as she begins life without her husband of 73 years

The Queen walked alone into the church as she begins life without her husband of 73 years

The Queen walked alone into the church as she begins life without her husband of 73 years

The masked Queen, wearing a mask and dressed in all black, is led to her seat in the chapel where she sat alone

The masked Queen, wearing a mask and dressed in all black, is led to her seat in the chapel where she sat alone

The masked Queen, wearing a mask and dressed in all black, is led to her seat in the chapel where she sat alone

Pall Bearers carrying the coffin into the Chapel with his Royal Navy cap and sword

Pall Bearers carrying the coffin into the Chapel with his Royal Navy cap and sword

Pall Bearers carrying the coffin into the Chapel with his Royal Navy cap and sword

There were tears in church from royals including Prince Charles as the duke's coffin was taken to the altar

There were tears in church from royals including Prince Charles as the duke's coffin was taken to the altar

There were tears in church from royals including Prince Charles as the duke’s coffin was taken to the altar

The coffin is carried up the world famous steps of St George's Chapel on its final journey

The coffin is carried up the world famous steps of St George's Chapel on its final journey

The coffin is carried up the world famous steps of St George’s Chapel on its final journey

Prince Philip's coffin carried by pallbearers from the armed forces on an extraordinary day of pomp and ceremony

Prince Philip's coffin carried by pallbearers from the armed forces on an extraordinary day of pomp and ceremony

Prince Philip’s coffin carried by pallbearers from the armed forces on an extraordinary day of pomp and ceremony

Prince Charles looked emotional next to his siblings with his children following behind

Prince Charles looked emotional next to his siblings with his children following behind

Prince Charles looked emotional next to his siblings with his children following behind

The Duke of Cambridge and Duke of Sussex, who have a troubled relationship, did not walk shoulder to shoulder with their cousin Peter Phillips between them

The Royal Family's procession was led by Prince Charles and Princess Anne who looked emotional following the casket

The Royal Family's procession was led by Prince Charles and Princess Anne who looked emotional following the casket

The Royal Family’s procession was led by Prince Charles and Princess Anne who looked emotional following the casket

Prince Philip's coffin has emerged from Windsor Castle as the Royal Family joined the Queen in mourning her husband at his funeral

Prince Philip's coffin has emerged from Windsor Castle as the Royal Family joined the Queen in mourning her husband at his funeral

Prince Philip’s coffin has emerged from Windsor Castle as the Royal Family joined the Queen in mourning her husband at his funeral

The Duke of Edinburgh's casket was covered in his personal standard and carried his sword, naval cap and a wreath of flowers as masked pallbearers lowered him on to his extraordinary self-designed Land Rover hearse

The Duke of Edinburgh's casket was covered in his personal standard and carried his sword, naval cap and a wreath of flowers as masked pallbearers lowered him on to his extraordinary self-designed Land Rover hearse

The Duke of Edinburgh’s casket was covered in his personal standard and carried his sword, naval cap and a wreath of flowers as masked pallbearers lowered him on to his extraordinary self-designed Land Rover hearse

Prince Charles looks emotional as he is joined by Prince Andrew and Princess Anne as they follow their father's coffin

Prince Charles looks emotional as he is joined by Prince Andrew and Princess Anne as they follow their father's coffin

Prince Charles looks emotional as he is joined by Prince Andrew and Princess Anne as they follow their father’s coffin

The bearer Party found by The Queen's Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards carry the coffin of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh to the purpose built Land Rover Hearse

The bearer Party found by The Queen's Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards carry the coffin of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh to the purpose built Land Rover Hearse

The bearer Party found by The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards carry the coffin of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh to the purpose built Land Rover Hearse

The coffin was lowered gently on to the Land Rover hearse

The coffin was lowered gently on to the Land Rover hearse

The coffin was lowered gently on to the Land Rover hearse

The purpose built Land Rover Defender hearse waits for Philip's coffin to be carried out from the castle

The purpose built Land Rover Defender hearse waits for Philip's coffin to be carried out from the castle

The purpose built Land Rover Defender hearse waits for Philip’s coffin to be carried out from the castle

The key timings for Prince Philip’s emotional funeral

The ceremonial arrangements for Prince Philip’s funeral today will reflect military affiliations and personal elements of his life. The congregation will wear masks for the service and members of the royal family will be wearing morning coat with medals or day dress. Philip has been lying at rest in the private chapel in Windsor Castle. Here is a timeline of events:

  • 11am: The coffin, covered with Philip’s personal standard along with his sword, naval cap and a wreath of flowers, was moved from the private chapel to the Inner Hall of Windsor Castle by members of The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.
  • 2pm: The Lord Chamberlain, the Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle and the Dean of Windsor were present in the Inner Hall.
  • 2.10pm: The Dean said prayers before leaving by car to St George’s Chapel.
  • 2.15pm: Representatives from the services were in place in the Quadrangle to show Philip’s special military relationships. The Quadrangle will also be lined by the Household Cavalry and The Foot Guards.
  • 2.17pm: The band of the Grenadier Guards struck up in Engine Court.
  • Between 2.20pm and 2.27pm. Members of the royal family and Philip’s relatives who were not taking part in the procession left Windsor Castle by car to make the journey to the chapel.
  • 2.27pm. The Land Rover, upon which the coffin will be placed, entered the Quadrangle via George IV Gate where bands at the site begin to play music. 
  • 2.40pm: Members of Philip’s household took up their positions in the procession and the bands stop playing music.
  • 2.41pm: The coffin emerged from the State Entrance and was met by members of the royal family who are walking in the procession. They were not be wearing uniforms. A royal salute was given by the service detachments, the service chiefs, the pall bearers, the Major General commanding the Household Division and his staff give a royal salute. The coffin was placed on to the Land Rover.
  • 2.44pm: The Queen, accompanied by a lady-in-waiting, left from the Sovereign’s Entrance in the State Bentley as the national anthem played. The Bentley paused as it reached the rear of the procession so the front section of the procession can turn to face the direction of travel.
  • 2.45pm: The procession, which took eight minutes, set off. The firing of minute guns by The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery from the East Lawn and the sound of the Curfew Tower Bell formed the backdrop as members of the royal family who are already at St George’s Chapel stand to view the procession. The Queen was received by the Dean of Windsor. A royal salute was given by the Windsor Castle Guard as the coffin passes the Parade Ground. The Band of the Grenadier Guards stopped playing and marched through into Denton’s Commons as the procession approaches. The Rifles Guard of Honour, positioned in Horseshoe Cloister, gave a royal salute and the national anthem was played. The service chiefs, the Major General commanded the Household Division and his staff to halt on the north side of the West Steps and turned to face the coffin.
  • 2.53pm: The Land Rover arrived at the foot of the West Steps of the chapel. A Royal Navy piping party sounded once as the Land Rover stopped and the pall bearers took their positions. The coffin was carried up the steps and halted on the second landing as members of the royal family take their positions on the steps.
  • 3pm: The National Minute’s Silence, signalled by a gun fired by The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery, took  place. After the minute’s silence, the Dean of Windsor and the Archbishop of Canterbury received the coffin which was followed by the members of the royal family who have walked in the procession.
  •  The Dean gave the commendation as the coffin is lowered into the Royal Vault. A lament was then be played by a Pipe Major of the Royal Regiment of Scotland. The Last Post was sounded by buglers of the Royal Marines. The Archbishop of Canterbury pronounced the Blessing, after which the national anthem was sung by the four singers present.
  • After the service: The Queen and members of the royal family and Philip’s relatives left the chapel via the Galilee Porch.
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The Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin was covered in his personal standard and carried his sword, naval cap and a wreath of flowers with a handwritten note from his wife as pallbearers placed him on to his extraordinary self-designed green Land Rover Defender hearse in the castle’s quadrangle packed with hundreds of armed personnel.

After the eight minute procession and the 50 minute service, his coffin was lowered into the Royal Vault. A lament was played by a lone piper of the Royal Regiment of Scotland and the Last Post was then sounded by buglers of Philip’s beloved Royal Marines who then played Action Stations at the specific request of The Duke of Edinburgh.  

Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, pronounced the Blessing before the 30 royal mourners silently filed out of the church into cars to take them the short journey back to castle. Harry and William decided to walk back with Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, and were seen smiling speaking animatedly as they were reunited for the first time in a year where their relationship became fractured.

The emotional Queen had arrived at the funeral as the national anthem played and the royal Bentley stopped next to her beloved husband’s coffin, where she poignantly paused for a moment of reflection as cannons fired and bells tolled in remembrance of the duke, wiping tears from her eyes.

Her Majesty was then driven to St George’s Chapel with her lady in waiting Susan Hussey, before being sat alone at the front of the church where she stood and bowed her head during the national minute’s silence. She looked at the coffin throughout the poignant service, where the majority of her children and grandchildren were on the verge of tears. 

Following behind the coffin was the royal procession, led by Philip’s children Prince Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward. The grandchildren, including Prince William and Prince Harry, followed but the feuding brothers were separated by their cousin Peter Phillips, viewed as a ‘peacemaker’ between the two. 

The Duke of Cambridge entered the chapel one place ahead of his younger brother, as the mourners filed into the historic gothic chapel without saying anything to each other. But they later spoke as they walked back to the castle, with Kate taking a step back to let them spend time alone.

The Queen had decided that no royals should wear military uniform after Prince Andrew demanded to dress as an Admiral and Prince Harry was stripped of his titles. They were allowed to wear their medals, however. Andrew was seen driving away in a casual suit and aviator sunglasses around an hour after the funeral ended.

The Queen wore Queen Mary’s Richmond Brooch, while Camilla wore the Rifles Brooch. The Duchess of Cornwall wore the brooch in July 2020 when Philip’s role as Colonel-in-Chief of the infantry regiment The Rifles was formally handed over to her.

Kate wore a necklace and earrings borrowed from the Queen.

After the funeral ended at 3.49pm, the Queen led the Royal Family from the chapel, followed by the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall.

She had a brief conversation with the Dean of Windsor outside the chapel before being driven away.

Other members of the royal family walked away from the chapel in small groups, chatting as they walked through the sunlit grounds, including William and Harry.

Many of the royals only stayed at the castle for a short period before heading home.

It came after an emotional service that ended with the Blessing, pronounced by the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, the congregation remained standing as the choir sang the national anthem. 

Her Majesty and her family left the Chapel via the Galilee Porch escorted by the Dean of Windsor and the Archbishop of Canterbury.

After the service, Luke Bond, assistant director of music, at St George’s Chapel, played Prelude and Fugue in C minor BWV 546 by Johann Sebastian Bach.

The Duke of Edinburgh has been interred in the Royal Vault of St George’s Chapel.

His coffin was placed on a catafalque on a marble slab in the Quire and lowered into the vault by electric motor.

The Royal Vault at Windsor was created between 1804 and 1810 for George III, who died in 1820 and is one of three kings buried there. Also interred in the vault are George IV and William IV.

Others buried there include George III’s wife Queen Charlotte and their daughter Princess Amelia, George IV’s daughter Princess Charlotte and Queen Victoria’s father the Duke of Kent.

After he was lowered the Dean of Windsor gave the poignant Commendation: ‘Go forth upon thy journey from this world, O Christian soul; In the name of God the Father Almighty who created thee; In the name of Jesus Christ who suffered for thee; In the name of the Holy Spirit who strengtheneth thee; May thy portion this day be in peace, and thy dwelling in the heavenly Jerusalem. Amen.’

The Archbishop of Canterbury then said a prayer: ‘O Lord God, when thou givest to thy servants to endeavour any great matter, grant us also to know that it is not the beginning, but the continuing of the same unto the end, until it be thoroughly finished, which yieldeth the true glory; through him, who for the finishing of thy work laid down his life, our Redeemer, Jesus Christ. Amen.

‘Almighty God, Father of all mercies and giver of all comfort: Deal graciously, we pray thee, with those who mourn; that casting every care on thee they may know the consolation of thy love; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.’ 

Prince Charles and Prince William arrived at Windsor  first with their wives to support the Queen today as she said her final farewell to her ‘strength and stay’ after their extraordinary 73-year life together.

The grieving Prince of Wales, who shed tears for his late father when viewing tributes left at Buckingham Palace this week, looked sombre in a black mask as he was driven into his mother’s Berkshire home.  

His wife Camilla arrived separately just as the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, who was wearing the Queen’s pearls, left Kensington Palace. Zara Tindall and his husband Mike arrived at the castle shortly afterwards followed by other grandchildren including Princess Beatrice and spouse Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi.

Prince Andrew, the Duke of York, was among the last royals to arrive at the castle – but Harry was not seen arriving and may have stayed at the castle after leaving quarantine at Frogmore Cottage after his five days of self-isolation ended yesterday.

At a sunny Windsor Castle, deserted with no crowds allowed, the quadrangle was packed with bands playing the prince’s favourite songs and hymns including Jerusalem as his extraordinary Land Rover hearse arrived flanked by senior officers from the duke’s regiments.

Troops stood with their heads bowed as the Land Rover, upon which the coffin will be placed, was driven into the quadrangle while military bands played music selected by the duke.

The Duke of York was seen after the funeral in a Range Rover in aviator sunglasses

The Duke of York was seen after the funeral in a Range Rover in aviator sunglasses

The Duke of York was seen after the funeral in a Range Rover in aviator sunglasses

The Duchess of Cornwall looked tired and emotional as she left Windsor Castle

The Duchess of Cornwall looked tired and emotional as she left Windsor Castle

The Duchess of Cornwall looked tired and emotional as she left Windsor Castle

Princess Beatrice of York and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi also looked serious as they left Windsor this evening

Princess Beatrice of York and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi also looked serious as they left Windsor this evening

Princess Beatrice of York and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi also looked serious as they left Windsor this evening

Princess Margaret's daughter Lady Sarah Chatto, the Queen's favourite niece, wore pearl earrings and low brimmed black hat as she left Windsor

Princess Margaret's daughter Lady Sarah Chatto, the Queen's favourite niece, wore pearl earrings and low brimmed black hat as she left Windsor

Princess Margaret’s daughter Lady Sarah Chatto, the Queen’s favourite niece, wore pearl earrings and low brimmed black hat as she left Windsor 

Princess Alexandra speaks in the car as she leaves the Windsor Castle funeral

Princess Alexandra speaks in the car as she leaves the Windsor Castle funeral

Princess Alexandra speaks in the car as she leaves the Windsor Castle funeral

Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, points and asks for direction at her friend's final farewell

Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, points and asks for direction at her friend's final farewell

Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, points and asks for direction at her friend’s final farewell

Cannons were fired all over the UK at the beginning of the funeral, including here at Hillsborough Castle, Co Down

Cannons were fired all over the UK at the beginning of the funeral, including here at Hillsborough Castle, Co Down

A view of the gun salute at Edinburgh Castle, a single round was fired followed by a single round a minute later to begin and end the National Minute Silence

A view of the gun salute at Edinburgh Castle, a single round was fired followed by a single round a minute later to begin and end the National Minute Silence

Cannons were fired all over the UK at the beginning of the minute’s silence at the start of the funeral, including at Hillsborough Castle, Co Down (left) and at Edinburgh Castle (right)

A person holds the order of service for the highly emotional event at Windsor

A person holds the order of service for the highly emotional event at Windsor

A person holds the order of service for the highly emotional event at Windsor

Mourners including, front row from left, Kate Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William, Prince Edward, Viscount Severn, Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor, Sophie Countess of Wessex, Camilla Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Charles during the funeral of Prince Philip, at St George's Chapel

Mourners including, front row from left, Kate Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William, Prince Edward, Viscount Severn, Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor, Sophie Countess of Wessex, Camilla Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Charles during the funeral of Prince Philip, at St George's Chapel

Mourners including, front row from left, Kate Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William, Prince Edward, Viscount Severn, Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor, Sophie Countess of Wessex, Camilla Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Charles during the funeral of Prince Philip, at St George’s Chapel

William and Harry said on opposite sides of the chapel where households were split into bubbles

William and Harry said on opposite sides of the chapel where households were split into bubbles

William and Harry said on opposite sides of the chapel where households were split into bubbles

Prince Harry and Prince William seemed locked in conversation as they left St George's Chapel following Prince Philip's funeral service

Prince Harry and Prince William seemed locked in conversation as they left St George's Chapel following Prince Philip's funeral service

Prince Harry and Prince William seemed locked in conversation as they left St George’s Chapel following Prince Philip’s funeral service

Prince Harry and Prince William walked close together after leaving the funeral service. They appeared to be chatting as they walked

Prince Harry and Prince William walked close together after leaving the funeral service. They appeared to be chatting as they walked

Prince Harry and Prince William walked close together after leaving the funeral service. They appeared to be chatting as they walked

The brothers were locking in conversation with Kate Middleton a short distance behind after they left the funeral service

The brothers were locking in conversation with Kate Middleton a short distance behind after they left the funeral service

The brothers were locking in conversation with Kate Middleton a short distance behind after they left the funeral service

The Queen left St George's Chapel in a car after husband Prince Phillip's poignant funeral service ended this afternoon

The Queen left St George's Chapel in a car after husband Prince Phillip's poignant funeral service ended this afternoon

The Queen left St George’s Chapel in a car after husband Prince Phillip’s poignant funeral service ended this afternoon

Queen Elizabeth II (top right) and the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby watch as the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin is carried into St George's Chapel

Queen Elizabeth II (top right) and the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby watch as the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin is carried into St George's Chapel

Queen Elizabeth II (top right) and the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby watch as the Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin is carried into St George’s Chapel

James Viscount Severn, the Earl of Wessex, the Countess of Wessex and Lady Louise Windsor during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George's Chapel

James Viscount Severn, the Earl of Wessex, the Countess of Wessex and Lady Louise Windsor during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George's Chapel

James Viscount Severn, the Earl of Wessex, the Countess of Wessex and Lady Louise Windsor during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George’s Chapel

Princess Eugenie and her husband Jack Brooksbank attend the funeral of Prince Philip following his death at the age of 99

Princess Eugenie and her husband Jack Brooksbank attend the funeral of Prince Philip following his death at the age of 99

Princess Eugenie and her husband Jack Brooksbank attend the funeral of Prince Philip following his death at the age of 99

Princess Anne, right, and Prince Edward walk together during the funeral of Britain's Prince Philip inside Windsor Castle

Princess Anne, right, and Prince Edward walk together during the funeral of Britain's Prince Philip inside Windsor Castle

Princess Anne, right, and Prince Edward walk together during the funeral of Britain’s Prince Philip inside Windsor Castle

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence and Peter Phillips during the funeral of Prince Philip

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence and Peter Phillips during the funeral of Prince Philip

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence and Peter Phillips during the funeral of Prince Philip

The Duke of Cambridge, the Duke of Sussex and Peter Phillip walk up the West Steps outside St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle

The Duke of Cambridge, the Duke of Sussex and Peter Phillip walk up the West Steps outside St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle

The Duke of Cambridge, the Duke of Sussex and Peter Phillip walk up the West Steps outside St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle

Princess Anne, Prince Charles, Prince Andrew, Prince Edward, Prince William, Peter Phillips, Prince Harry, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence follow Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh's coffin

Princess Anne, Prince Charles, Prince Andrew, Prince Edward, Prince William, Peter Phillips, Prince Harry, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence follow Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh's coffin

Princess Anne, Prince Charles, Prince Andrew, Prince Edward, Prince William, Peter Phillips, Prince Harry, Earl of Snowdon David Armstrong-Jones and Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence follow Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin

Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of York during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George's Chapel this afternoon

Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of York during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George's Chapel this afternoon

Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of York during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George’s Chapel this afternoon

Prince Philip's flag-draped coffin in the centre of St George's Chapel as his family watch on during his funeral service this afternoon

Prince Philip's flag-draped coffin in the centre of St George's Chapel as his family watch on during his funeral service this afternoon

Prince Philip’s flag-draped coffin in the centre of St George’s Chapel as his family watch on during his funeral service this afternoon

Queen Elizabeth II (left) looks at the coffin of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, during his funeral at St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle

Queen Elizabeth II (left) looks at the coffin of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, during his funeral at St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle

Queen Elizabeth II (left) looks at the coffin of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, during his funeral at St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, are joined by members of the royal family during the service

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, are joined by members of the royal family during the service

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, are joined by members of the royal family during the service

Members of the royal family follow the coffin into St George's Chapel during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh, at Windsor Castle

Members of the royal family follow the coffin into St George's Chapel during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh, at Windsor Castle

Members of the royal family follow the coffin into St George’s Chapel during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh, at Windsor Castle

An emotional Queen Elizabeth during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George's Chapel in Windsor this afternoon

An emotional Queen Elizabeth during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George's Chapel in Windsor this afternoon

An emotional Queen Elizabeth during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in St George’s Chapel in Windsor this afternoon

Members of the royal family leave St George's Chapel following the conclusion of the funeral service for Prince Philip

Members of the royal family leave St George's Chapel following the conclusion of the funeral service for Prince Philip

Members of the royal family leave St George’s Chapel following the conclusion of the funeral service for Prince Philip

Brothers Harry and William appeared to share words while Harry also looked locked in conversation with Kate Middleton after leaving the service

Brothers Harry and William appeared to share words while Harry also looked locked in conversation with Kate Middleton after leaving the service

Brothers Harry and William appeared to share words while Harry also looked locked in conversation with Kate Middleton after leaving the service

Prince Harry and Prince William were joined by Kate Middleton as they left the church following the funeral service

Prince Harry and Prince William were joined by Kate Middleton as they left the church following the funeral service

Prince Harry and Prince William were joined by Kate Middleton as they left the church following the funeral service

The royals followed social distancing measures as they gathered in St George's Chapel to pay tribute to Prince Philip today

The royals followed social distancing measures as they gathered in St George's Chapel to pay tribute to Prince Philip today

The royals followed social distancing measures as they gathered in St George’s Chapel to pay tribute to Prince Philip today

The Queen sits alone as pallbearers carry the coffin of her husband of 73 years Prince Philip into St George's Chapel

The Queen sits alone as pallbearers carry the coffin of her husband of 73 years Prince Philip into St George's Chapel

The Queen sits alone as pallbearers carry the coffin of her husband of 73 years Prince Philip into St George’s Chapel

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex walks during the funeral procession of Britain's Prince Philip this afternoon after flying in from LA for the event

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex walks during the funeral procession of Britain's Prince Philip this afternoon after flying in from LA for the event

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex walks during the funeral procession of Britain’s Prince Philip this afternoon after flying in from LA for the event

The bearer Party found by The Queen's Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards carry the coffin of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh to the purpose built Land Rover Hearse

The bearer Party found by The Queen's Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards carry the coffin of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh to the purpose built Land Rover Hearse

The bearer Party found by The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards carry the coffin of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh to the purpose built Land Rover Hearse

Prince Harry sits alone in a corner of St George's Chapel during Prince Philip's funeral service in Windsor this afternoon

Prince Harry sits alone in a corner of St George's Chapel during Prince Philip's funeral service in Windsor this afternoon

Prince Harry sits alone in a corner of St George’s Chapel during Prince Philip’s funeral service in Windsor this afternoon

Prince Edward and his family near the coffin of his father Prince Philip at the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral service in St George's Chapel

Prince Edward and his family near the coffin of his father Prince Philip at the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral service in St George's Chapel

Prince Edward and his family near the coffin of his father Prince Philip at the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral service in St George’s Chapel

A solemn Prince Charles bows his head during his father's funeral service as he is joined by Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall

A solemn Prince Charles bows his head during his father's funeral service as he is joined by Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall

A solemn Prince Charles bows his head during his father’s funeral service as he is joined by Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall

Prince Harry bows his head during Prince Philip's funeral service at St George's Chapel following the Duke of Edinburgh's death

Prince Harry bows his head during Prince Philip's funeral service at St George's Chapel following the Duke of Edinburgh's death

Prince Harry bows his head during Prince Philip’s funeral service at St George’s Chapel following the Duke of Edinburgh’s death

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at Prince Philip's funeral service at St George's Chapel in Windsor this afternoon

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at Prince Philip's funeral service at St George's Chapel in Windsor this afternoon

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at Prince Philip’s funeral service at St George’s Chapel in Windsor this afternoon

Queen Elizabeth II takes her seat alone in the quire of St. George's Chapel during the funeral of Prince Philip, the man who had been by her side for 73 years

Queen Elizabeth II takes her seat alone in the quire of St. George's Chapel during the funeral of Prince Philip, the man who had been by her side for 73 years

Queen Elizabeth II takes her seat alone in the quire of St. George’s Chapel during the funeral of Prince Philip, the man who had been by her side for 73 years

Wreaths from members of the Royal Family were in the aisle during today's service

Wreaths from members of the Royal Family were in the aisle during today's service

Wreaths from members of the Royal Family were in the aisle during today’s service

The Duchess of Cambridge arrives at St George's Chapel for the funeral

The Duchess of Cambridge arrives at St George's Chapel for the funeral

Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall arrived at the ceremony without her husband, who was part of the main procession

Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall arrived at the ceremony without her husband, who was part of the main procession

The Duchess of Cambridge arrives at St George’s Chapel for the funeral followed by Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall arrived at the ceremony without her husband, who was part of the main procession

Sophie Wessex was also dressed in all black with a mask as the Royal Family mourns Philip's passing

Sophie Wessex was also dressed in all black with a mask as the Royal Family mourns Philip's passing

Sophie Wessex was also dressed in all black with a mask as the Royal Family mourns Philip’s passing

Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, looks on as she heads to the funeral of her close friend and confidante Philip

Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, looks on as she heads to the funeral of her close friend and confidante Philip

Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, looks on as she heads to the funeral of her close friend and confidante Philip

The Duke of Kent ahead of the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

The Duke of Kent ahead of the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

The Duke of Kent ahead of the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

Military personnel bow their heads and hold their guns down as the procession passes

Military personnel bow their heads and hold their guns down as the procession passes

Military personnel bow their heads and hold their guns down as the procession passes

Sailors from the Royal Navy bowed their heads low as the Queen's husband is laid to rest

Sailors from the Royal Navy bowed their heads low as the Queen's husband is laid to rest

Sailors from the Royal Navy bowed their heads low as the Queen’s husband is laid to rest

The Prince of Wales and The Princess Royal follow the Land Rover Defender carrying the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin

The Prince of Wales and The Princess Royal follow the Land Rover Defender carrying the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin

The Prince of Wales and The Princess Royal follow the Land Rover Defender carrying the Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin

William and Kate leave Kensington Palace ahead of their first meeting with Prince Harry for more than a year following the turmoil of Megxit

William and Kate leave Kensington Palace ahead of their first meeting with Prince Harry for more than a year following the turmoil of Megxit

William and Kate leave Kensington Palace ahead of their first meeting with Prince Harry for more than a year following the turmoil of Megxit

Prince Charles, wearing a black mask, arrives at Windsor Castle for his father Prince Philip's funeral  today

Prince Charles, wearing a black mask, arrives at Windsor Castle for his father Prince Philip's funeral  today

Prince Charles, wearing a black mask, arrives at Windsor Castle for his father Prince Philip’s funeral  today

The Duke of Gloucester leaves Kensington Palace for the funeral at nearby Windsor

The Duke of Gloucester leaves Kensington Palace for the funeral at nearby Windsor

The Duke of Gloucester leaves Kensington Palace for the funeral at nearby Windsor

The Honourable Lady Ogilvy waves as she arrives at the Windsor Castle

The Honourable Lady Ogilvy waves as she arrives at the Windsor Castle

The Honourable Lady Ogilvy waves as she arrives at the Windsor Castle

Prince Philipp, of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, arrived at Windsor, one of three of Philip's German relatives to attend

Prince Philipp, of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, arrived at Windsor, one of three of Philip's German relatives to attend

Prince Philipp, of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, arrived at Windsor, one of three of Philip’s German relatives to attend

The purpose built Land Rover Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh's coffin, arrived at Windsor Castle

The purpose built Land Rover Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh's coffin, arrived at Windsor Castle

The purpose built Land Rover Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin, arrived at Windsor Castle

Airmen of the Royal Air Force marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. More than 700 members of the Armed Forces are involved in the event

Airmen of the Royal Air Force marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. More than 700 members of the Armed Forces are involved in the event

Airmen of the Royal Air Force marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. More than 700 members of the Armed Forces are involved in the event

The Highlanders, 4th Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland are seen marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip

The Highlanders, 4th Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland are seen marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip

The Highlanders, 4th Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland are seen marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery arrive at Windsor Castle in preparation for the Gun Salute on the palace grounds

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery arrive at Windsor Castle in preparation for the Gun Salute on the palace grounds

The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery arrive at Windsor Castle in preparation for the Gun Salute on the palace grounds

Soldiers of the Rifles are seen marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip this afternoon after the Duke of Edinburgh's death at 99

Soldiers of the Rifles are seen marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip this afternoon after the Duke of Edinburgh's death at 99

Soldiers of the Rifles are seen marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip this afternoon after the Duke of Edinburgh’s death at 99

Sir David Attenborough seen walking with his daughter Susan Attenborough in Windsor just before the funeral of Prince Philip

Sir David Attenborough seen walking with his daughter Susan Attenborough in Windsor just before the funeral of Prince Philip

Sir David Attenborough seen walking with his daughter Susan Attenborough in Windsor just before the funeral of Prince Philip

Members of the military march before the funeral service of Britain's Prince Philip. Philip, who was married to Queen Elizabeth II for 73 years, died on April 9 aged 99

Members of the military march before the funeral service of Britain's Prince Philip. Philip, who was married to Queen Elizabeth II for 73 years, died on April 9 aged 99

Members of the military march before the funeral service of Britain’s Prince Philip. Philip, who was married to Queen Elizabeth II for 73 years, died on April 9 aged 99

The Foot Guards Band are seen in formation ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. The late Duke planned his entire funeral before his death

The Foot Guards Band are seen in formation ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. The late Duke planned his entire funeral before his death

The Foot Guards Band are seen in formation ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. The late Duke planned his entire funeral before his death

Prince Philip's carriage heading into St George's Chapel ahead of his funeral. His hat, scarves and riding gloves were placed on the seat

Prince Philip's carriage heading into St George's Chapel ahead of his funeral. His hat, scarves and riding gloves were placed on the seat

Prince Philip’s carriage heading into St George’s Chapel ahead of his funeral. His hat, scarves and riding gloves were placed on the seat

Members of the military marching in the Engine Court ahead of the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in Windsor Castle

Members of the military marching in the Engine Court ahead of the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in Windsor Castle

Members of the military marching in the Engine Court ahead of the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in Windsor Castle

Sophie, Countess of Wessex arrives for the funeral service of Britain's Prince Philip this afternoon. She will be joined by several family members

Sophie, Countess of Wessex arrives for the funeral service of Britain's Prince Philip this afternoon. She will be joined by several family members

Sophie, Countess of Wessex arrives for the funeral service of Britain’s Prince Philip this afternoon. She will be joined by several family members

Guests arrive ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle today. Only 30, including the Queen, are allowed into the funeral

Guests arrive ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle today. Only 30, including the Queen, are allowed into the funeral

Guests arrive ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle today. Only 30, including the Queen, are allowed into the funeral 

The Cambridges saw Prince Harry for the first time in a year after the brothers fell out over Megxit and the Sussexes extraordinary and damaging Oprah intervieThe Duke of Edinburgh’s insignia, Field Marshal’s baton, RAF wings and decorations from Denmark and Greece resting on cushions had been placed on the altar of St George’s Chapel to mark the passing of the ‘grandfather of the nation’.

At 11am his coffin, covered with Philip’s personal standard along with his sword, naval cap and a wreath of flowers, was moved from Her Majesty’s private chapel to the Inner Hall of Windsor Castle by members of The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

Minutes later a convoy of funeral cars swept the first mourners into the main gates as a single Queen’s Guard stood to attention, as soldiers on horses trotted into the grounds where 700 armed forces personnel will gather. The early guests arriving included The Countess Mountbatten of Burma, Lady Penny Brabourne, Philip’s close friend and confidante, and Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury.

The castle has a ‘ring of steel’ protecting it led by armed units from the Metropolitan Police. Tens of millions of people in Britain and around the world will be watching the most important royal funeral since the Queen Mother died in 2002. The event, pared back because of the pandemic, was overseen by Philip for at least 20 years before his death.

Her Majesty is determined to ensure it reflects his ‘unwavering loyalty’ to her during their 73-year marriage and her 68-year reign on the throne as well his lifetime of service to the UK and the Commonwealth in his 99-year life. Philip was the longest serving consort to a monarch in history, a record unlikely to be ever broken.  

In pre-pandemic times thousands of mourners would have travelled to the Berkshire town to pay their respects, but the Royal Family, the Government and police are asking the public to stay away. However, it appears hundreds have defied the warnings and gathered to pay their respects in Windsor despite the risk of fines or even arrest.

People who knew Philip best have said he would be pleased about the smaller crowds because he always demanded ‘no fuss’ in the event of his death. People staying at home for the funeral decked their homes in Union Flags and pictures of the duke and his wife, with many enjoying traditional full English breakfasts or afternoon teas as they watched on TV.

A sombre Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, arrived separately from her husband as the world watched Windsor

A sombre Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, arrived separately from her husband as the world watched Windsor

A sombre Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, arrived separately from her husband as the world watched Windsor

Prince Andrew was among the last royals to arrive, wearing a suit after a row over what uniform he wanted to wear

Prince Andrew was among the last royals to arrive, wearing a suit after a row over what uniform he wanted to wear

Prince Andrew was among the last royals to arrive, wearing a suit after a row over what uniform he wanted to wear

Mike Tindall and Zara Phillips, who recently had a baby named after the Duke of Edinburgh, drive into the castle this afternoon

Mike Tindall and Zara Phillips, who recently had a baby named after the Duke of Edinburgh, drive into the castle this afternoon

Mike Tindall and Zara Phillips, who recently had a baby named after the Duke of Edinburgh, drive into the castle this afternoon

Princess Beatrice and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi were smiling as they saw the crowds at Windsor as they arrived for the sad event

Princess Beatrice and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi were smiling as they saw the crowds at Windsor as they arrived for the sad event

Princess Beatrice and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi were smiling as they saw the crowds at Windsor as they arrived for the sad event

Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, was driven to the castle. He will praise Philip's 'life of service to the nation and Commonwealth' at the service

Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, was driven to the castle. He will praise Philip's 'life of service to the nation and Commonwealth' at the service

Lady Penny Brabourne, the duke's close friend and confidante, was also seen arriving

Lady Penny Brabourne, the duke's close friend and confidante, was also seen arriving

Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, was driven to the castle. He will praise Philip’s ‘life of service to the nation and Commonwealth’ at the service. Lady Penny Brabourne, the duke’s close friend and confidante, was also seen arriving

Philip’s favourite carriage arrives at Windsor, with his hat and gloved in his seat in a poignant scene

The first mourners have been swept into Windsor Castle as Prince Philip's coffin is moved into position ahead of his funeral this afternoon

The first mourners have been swept into Windsor Castle as Prince Philip's coffin is moved into position ahead of his funeral this afternoon

The first mourners have been swept into Windsor Castle as Prince Philip’s coffin is moved into position ahead of his funeral this afternoon

Members of the military march ahead of the funeral service at Prince Philip's Windsor home

Members of the military march ahead of the funeral service at Prince Philip's Windsor home

Members of the military march ahead of the funeral service at Prince Philip’s Windsor home

The Foot Guards Band are seen marching as the world remembers the extraordinary 99-year life of Philip

The Foot Guards Band are seen marching as the world remembers the extraordinary 99-year life of Philip

The Foot Guards Band are seen marching as the world remembers the extraordinary 99-year life of Philip

Members of the Household Cavalry march past St George's Chapel where Prince Philip's funeral is taking place

Members of the Household Cavalry march past St George's Chapel where Prince Philip's funeral is taking place

Members of the Household Cavalry march past St George’s Chapel where Prince Philip’s funeral is taking place

The Household Cavalry would normally be flanked by huge crowds of mourners, but today only a sea of flowers surrounded them

The Household Cavalry would normally be flanked by huge crowds of mourners, but today only a sea of flowers surrounded them

The Household Cavalry would normally be flanked by huge crowds of mourners, but today only a sea of flowers surrounded them

The soldiers in full uniform march through the grounds of the castle ahead of the most significant royal funeral in decades

This is the funeral procession for tomorrow's funeral, where William and Harry will not stand next to eachother with the Queen following behind in her car

This is the funeral procession for tomorrow's funeral, where William and Harry will not stand next to eachother with the Queen following behind in her car

This is the funeral procession for tomorrow’s funeral, where William and Harry will not stand next to eachother with the Queen following behind in her car

The duke’s favourite driving carriage, accompanied by two of his grooms, was pulled by his two trusty black Fell ponies, Balmoral Nevis and Notlaw Storm, to stand in the Quadrangle, ready for the procession to pass by.

It was a poignant reminder of Philip’s love of the fast-paced sport, which he took up when he turned 50 and continued to enjoy non-competitively in his 90s.

The polished dark green aluminium and steel four-wheeled carriage was built to the duke’s exact specifications eight years ago, and he began using at the age of 91 for riding around Windsor and other royal estates.

The detachments of service personnel from the military units the duke had a special relationship with are now in position on the green of the castle’s quadrangle – while lining its edge are troops from the Household Cavalry and the Foot Guards.

A few minutes later the Band of the Grenadier Guards, which will be at the head of the funeral procession, formed up in nearby Engine Court. 

The Chief of the Defence Staff, General Sir Nick Carter, said the funeral for the Duke of Edinburgh will be a ‘sombre moment’ but also a ‘celebratory moment’ of a life well-lived.

‘I think there won’t be a serviceman or servicewoman on parade today who won’t have their chest swelling with pride,’ he told Sky News.

‘We all have a huge regard for him. We have a huge regard for his wartime record and the care that he showed for veterans and for those still serving, and it’ll be a sombre moment for us, but it will also be a celebratory moment, I think, because it was a special life and a life that was well-lived.’

Speaking of the planning that has gone into the funeral proceedings, Lieutenant-Colonel James Greaves said the Armed Forces have been ‘leaning into this as much as we can’.

He told Sky News: ‘It’s been really full tilt ahead ever since we heard of His Royal Highness’s passing. We as a regiment, as the Grenadier Guards, we were straight away putting our bearer party front and centre, and just making sure that we were correctly prepared.

‘Collectively we’ve been training at Pirbright, it’s been socially distanced absolutely Covid-compliant, but clearly we have been leaning into this as much as we can.

‘We know how much His Royal Highness meant, not only to all of our regiments and units that are here on parade but also to the nation, so we are absolutely reflecting that which he gave to us we would like to give back to him today.’

Five coaches each carrying dozens of people in military uniforms have driven into the main entrance at Windsor Castle.

The large white vehicles drove in just after 12.30pm on Saturday.

Traffic on the high street was temporarily blocked off by police officers on motorbikes while pedestrians were halted by stewards.

Staff close to the castle had a difficult time ensuring pedestrians were keeping the pathways clear after the coaches had driven in.

Labour leader Keir Starmer said his thoughts are with the Queen and royal family ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral.

He tweeted: ‘Yesterday, I met inspiring young people completing the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award.

‘They told me about the confidence, experience and skills they’ve gained thanks to the scheme.

‘It’s a remarkable legacy for Prince Philip to leave our country.

‘Today, my thoughts are with The Queen, everyone in the royal family and the British people who will be mourning and remembering Prince Philip.’

Five coaches each carrying dozens of people in military uniforms were driven into the main entrance at Windsor Castle as the funeral edged closer.

The large white vehicles drove in just after 12.30pm on Saturday.

Traffic on the high street was temporarily blocked off by police officers on motorbikes while pedestrians were halted by stewards.

Staff close to the castle had a difficult time ensuring pedestrians were keeping the pathways clear after the coaches had driven in.

Early this morning members of the armed forces, police, security and the media were taking up positions around the castle ahead of this afternoon’s ceremony.

While much of the typical pageantry has been pared back, Buckingham Palace says the funeral will still reflect Philip’s life of service and the plans he himself spent years fine-tuning. 

Right down to the bespoke Land Rover hearse to carry his own coffin, the event – code-named Operation Forth Bridge – will be executed with military precision, leading up to the 3pm service at St George’s Chapel. 

The first glimpses inside the chapel shows the Duke’s insignia, Field Marshal’s baton, RAF wings and decorations from Denmark and Greece resting on cushions at the altar.

The Queen, 94, will say a private farewell to her husband, who she once called her ‘strength and stay’, before his body is driven to the chapel tailed by a small procession including Philip’s four children and three grandsons. 

Princess Beatrice arriving at Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, this afternoon. She is one of 30 guests

Princess Beatrice arriving at Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, this afternoon. She is one of 30 guests

Princess Beatrice arriving at Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, this afternoon. She is one of 30 guests

The purpose built Land Rover designed by Prince Philip that will carry the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin into Windsor Castle

The purpose built Land Rover designed by Prince Philip that will carry the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin into Windsor Castle

The purpose built Land Rover designed by Prince Philip that will carry the Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin into Windsor Castle

The Queen will follow her husband's coffin on his Land Rover hearse down from the castle to the chapel in her State Bentley

The Queen will follow her husband's coffin on his Land Rover hearse down from the castle to the chapel in her State Bentley

The Queen will follow her husband’s coffin on his Land Rover hearse down from the castle to the chapel in her State Bentley

Princess Eugenie of York arrives for the ceremonial funeral procession of Britain's Prince

Princess Eugenie of York arrives for the ceremonial funeral procession of Britain's Prince

Princess Eugenie of York arrives for the ceremonial funeral procession of Britain’s Prince Philip this afternoon ahead of the ceremony 

Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge arrives for the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle

Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge arrives for the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle

Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge arrives for the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle

Fell ponies, Balmoral Nevis and Notlaw Storm, pull the Duke of Edinburgh's carriage as it arrives at Windsor Castle

Fell ponies, Balmoral Nevis and Notlaw Storm, pull the Duke of Edinburgh's carriage as it arrives at Windsor Castle

Fell ponies, Balmoral Nevis and Notlaw Storm, pull the Duke of Edinburgh’s carriage as it arrives at Windsor Castle

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall arrives at St George's Chapel on the grounds of Windsor Castle on the day of the funeral of Prince Philip

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall arrives at St George's Chapel on the grounds of Windsor Castle on the day of the funeral of Prince Philip

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall arrives at St George’s Chapel on the grounds of Windsor Castle on the day of the funeral of Prince Philip

Zara Tindall and Mike Tindall arrive at the Galilee Porch of St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral service

Zara Tindall and Mike Tindall arrive at the Galilee Porch of St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral service

Zara Tindall and Mike Tindall arrive at the Galilee Porch of St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral service

The military gather in the Quadrangle ahead of during the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle

The military gather in the Quadrangle ahead of during the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle

The military gather in the Quadrangle ahead of during the funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle

The son of a hero of the Falklands War is among the group of senior officers who will carry Prince Philip on his final journey today

The son of a hero of the Falklands War is among the group of senior officers who will carry Prince Philip on his final journey today

The son of a hero of the Falklands War is among the group of senior officers who will carry Prince Philip on his final journey today

The coffin, transported from the castle to the chapel in a specially-modified Land Rover Philip helped to design, will be flanked by pallbearers drawn from the duke's special relationships - the Royal Marines, regiments, corps and air stations

The coffin, transported from the castle to the chapel in a specially-modified Land Rover Philip helped to design, will be flanked by pallbearers drawn from the duke's special relationships - the Royal Marines, regiments, corps and air stations

The coffin, transported from the castle to the chapel in a specially-modified Land Rover Philip helped to design, will be flanked by pallbearers drawn from the duke’s special relationships – the Royal Marines, regiments, corps and air stations

Her Majesty is determined to ensure the funeral reflects his 'unwavering loyalty' to her during their 73-year marriage and her 68-year reign on the throne as well his lifetime of service to the UK and the Commonwealth in his 99-year life

Her Majesty is determined to ensure the funeral reflects his 'unwavering loyalty' to her during their 73-year marriage and her 68-year reign on the throne as well his lifetime of service to the UK and the Commonwealth in his 99-year life

Her Majesty is determined to ensure the funeral reflects his ‘unwavering loyalty’ to her during their 73-year marriage and her 68-year reign on the throne as well his lifetime of service to the UK and the Commonwealth in his 99-year life

Prince Charles, Prince Andrew and Prince William led the procession of royals walking behind Prince Philip's coffin

Prince Charles, Prince Andrew and Prince William led the procession of royals walking behind Prince Philip's coffin

Prince Charles, Prince Andrew and Prince William led the procession of royals walking behind Prince Philip’s coffin

The Queen, accompanied by a lady-in-waiting,left from the Sovereign's Entrance in the State Bentley and followed behind her husband's coffin

The Queen, accompanied by a lady-in-waiting,left from the Sovereign's Entrance in the State Bentley and followed behind her husband's coffin

The Queen, accompanied by a lady-in-waiting,left from the Sovereign’s Entrance in the State Bentley and followed behind her husband’s coffin

Prince Philip's coffin is carried away on the custom-built Land Rover that he designed especially for his funeral

Prince Philip's coffin is carried away on the custom-built Land Rover that he designed especially for his funeral

Prince Philip’s coffin is carried away on the custom-built Land Rover that he designed especially for his funeral 

Prince Charles looks emotional as he is joined by Prince Andrew and Princess Anne as they follow their father's coffin

Prince Charles looks emotional as he is joined by Prince Andrew and Princess Anne as they follow their father's coffin

Prince Charles looks emotional as he is joined by Prince Andrew and Princess Anne as they follow their father’s coffin

Sources said she has been the ‘epitome of dignity’ this week, and the Archbishop of Canterbury paid tribute to her ‘extraordinary dignity and courage’.

Justin Welby praised Philip’s ‘life of service to the nation and Commonwealth’ at the service, added that he hoped the nation prayed for her and ‘hope for her to find strength in what must be an anguished moment’. 

The Dean of Windsor, in the Bidding, celebrated Philip’s ‘unwavering loyalty to our Queen’ and ‘his service to the nation and the Commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith’.

The sun shone on Windsor this morning, drawing people to the high street. 

Signs have been erected around the town urging members of the public to stay away from Windsor and other royal residences. 

Police patrols have been stepped up to enforce Covid rules, which ban large gatherings.  

Marshals have also been drafted in to help and were seen trooping through the town in high-vis jackets. 

As with all royal events, there was tight security and police divers were pictured searching a drain near the grounds, while snipers kept watch on rooftops. 

Reporters were struck by how quiet Windsor was this morning, drawing contrast with past major events such as Harry and Meghan’s 2018 wedding when the streets were filled with royal fans waving flags. 

A police sergeant told MailOnline: ‘It certainly looks like the Royal Family and Prince Phillip have been given the upmost respect.

‘Its 9am and I haven’t talked to one person who has come here to be at the castle today. I think people realise they’re better off at home watching the funeral on television.’

Trains into Windsor from Waterloo and Paddington were empty. A member of the station staff said: ‘Whenever there is a Royal occasion here, you get people sleeping overnight and certainly by 9am every train is packed.

‘Today there hasn’t been a single person who has passed through here to stand outside the castle.’

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery arrive at Windsor Castle in preparation for the Gun Salute on the palace grounds for Prince Philip's funeral

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery arrive at Windsor Castle in preparation for the Gun Salute on the palace grounds for Prince Philip's funeral

The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery arrive at Windsor Castle in preparation for the Gun Salute on the palace grounds for Prince Philip’s funeral

The Foot Guards Band are seen marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. Only 30 guests have been invited to the funeral because of coronavirus rules

The Foot Guards Band are seen marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. Only 30 guests have been invited to the funeral because of coronavirus rules

The Foot Guards Band are seen marching ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. Only 30 guests have been invited to the funeral because of coronavirus rules

The Foot Guards Band marching before the funeral. The event, pared back because of the pandemic, was overseen by Philip for at least 20 years before his death

The Foot Guards Band marching before the funeral. The event, pared back because of the pandemic, was overseen by Philip for at least 20 years before his death

The Foot Guards Band marching before the funeral. The event, pared back because of the pandemic, was overseen by Philip for at least 20 years before his death

Members of the military stand guard in formation on the grounds of Windsor Castle as the Royal Standard fag flutters on the day of funeral

Members of the military stand guard in formation on the grounds of Windsor Castle as the Royal Standard fag flutters on the day of funeral

Members of the military stand guard in formation on the grounds of Windsor Castle as the Royal Standard fag flutters on the day of funeral

While much of the typical pageantry has been pared back, Buckingham Palace says the funeral will still reflect Philip's life of service and the plans he himself spent years fine-tuning

While much of the typical pageantry has been pared back, Buckingham Palace says the funeral will still reflect Philip's life of service and the plans he himself spent years fine-tuning

While much of the typical pageantry has been pared back, Buckingham Palace says the funeral will still reflect Philip’s life of service and the plans he himself spent years fine-tuning

The Foot Guards Band marching before the funeral. Only 30 guests are at the funeral but the ceremonial event involved 700 members of the armed forces

The Foot Guards Band marching before the funeral. Only 30 guests are at the funeral but the ceremonial event involved 700 members of the armed forces

The Foot Guards Band marching before the funeral. Only 30 guests are at the funeral but the ceremonial event involved 700 members of the armed forces

The Military procession proceeds through the grounds of Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip following his death at 99

The Military procession proceeds through the grounds of Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip following his death at 99

The Military procession proceeds through the grounds of Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip following his death at 99

The Foot Guards Band are seen marching into position ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. Philip, who was married to Queen Elizabeth II for 73 years, died on April 9 aged 99

The Foot Guards Band are seen marching into position ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. Philip, who was married to Queen Elizabeth II for 73 years, died on April 9 aged 99

The Foot Guards Band are seen marching into position ahead of the funeral of Prince Philip. Philip, who was married to Queen Elizabeth II for 73 years, died on April 9 aged 99

Members of a military band march into position at Windsor Castle in Windsor ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral today

Members of a military band march into position at Windsor Castle in Windsor ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral today

Members of a military band march into position at Windsor Castle in Windsor ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral today

Local Alicia Evans, 48, who was walking her dog along the iconic Long Walk this morning was one of the few in the area.

She said: ‘If people are staying away then all I can say is good heavens for that.

‘It’s a private funeral with only 30 Royal mourners. This is not one of those occasions where we want to see union flags and bunting.

‘It’s a very sad day and I hope most of the public remember Philip at home in their thoughts and watch the funeral on television.’ 

A visible armed forces presence was on display, reflecting the Duke’s wishes for a military rather than a state funeral.

Philip served with distinction as a Naval officer in the Second World War and had association with all forces while the Queen’s consort.  

The duke’s coffin, draped in his personal standard and bearing his naval cap, sword and a wreath of flowers, will first be seen at 2.41pm today when it emerges from the State Entrance to Windsor Castle carried by a bearer party from The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards. 

Lieutenant Erica Bridge of the Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery said Philip’s affection for the armed forces would weigh heavily on the servicemen and women on duty.

She told BBC Radio 4’s Today progamme: ‘What is absolutely key to today is that the day is very much in line with the Duke of Edinburgh’s wishes. 

‘And that’s a really important thing to those people out there today – knowing that the Duke wanted them to be there and representing those units he had a very close affiliation with.’ 

Admiral Tony Radakin, the First Sea Lord, added: ‘It is (a naval send-off at the Duke’s funeral) but I think it is much bigger than that.

‘I really do think that for all of us in the military, today is about a royal funeral and it is about playing our part in that, but it is for the Royal Air Force, the British Army and the Royal Navy, and to reflect our dignity and respect and the affection we all had for Prince Philip, and the very clear affection that he had for all of us.’

General Sir Patrick Sanders, Commander of Strategic Command, who has met the duke several times and was at the rehearsal, said viewers can expect a highly moving funeral.

He told BBC Breakfast: ‘I was standing at the rehearsal yesterday and you hear those first notes of Nimrod, and the hairs go up at the back of your neck, you get a lump in your throat.

‘It’s difficult to stifle a tear as you think about the duke and the impact on the royal family and the whole nation – and you stand there a little stiffer, a little straighter, determined to do right by him.’

Royal biographer and Daily Mail columnist Robert Hardman said the funeral plan ‘very much reflects the man’.

Hundreds of members of the armed forces are taking part in the pared back funeral because of Covid with only 30 guests

Hundreds of members of the armed forces are taking part in the pared back funeral because of Covid with only 30 guests

Hundreds of members of the armed forces are taking part in the pared back funeral because of Covid with only 30 guests

A lone soldier walks from the main castle down towards St George's Chapel at an eerily deserted Windsor

A lone soldier walks from the main castle down towards St George's Chapel at an eerily deserted Windsor

A lone soldier walks from the main castle down towards St George’s Chapel at an eerily deserted Windsor

The first glimpse of the altar inside the chapel shows the Duke's insignia, Field Marshal's baton, RAF wings and decorations from Denmark and Greece resting on cushions

The first glimpse of the altar inside the chapel shows the Duke's insignia, Field Marshal's baton, RAF wings and decorations from Denmark and Greece resting on cushions

The first glimpse of the altar inside the chapel shows the Duke’s insignia, Field Marshal’s baton, RAF wings and decorations from Denmark and Greece resting on cushions

The King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery enter into Windsor Castle

The King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery enter into Windsor Castle

The King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery enter into Windsor Castle

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery move along The Long Walk towards the castle ahead of the procession this afternoon as crowds amassed

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery move along The Long Walk towards the castle ahead of the procession this afternoon as crowds amassed

The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery move along The Long Walk towards the castle ahead of the procession this afternoon as crowds amassed

The Kings Troop and their artillery arrive for the funeral, with the ceremonial event involved 700 members of the armed forces

A man raises a bowler hat to the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery as they ride past on the Long Walk

A man raises a bowler hat to the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery as they ride past on the Long Walk

A man raises a bowler hat to the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery as they ride past on the Long Walk

A police officer surveys the wreathes left by European royal families and world governments on the lawn outside St George's Chapel

A police officer surveys the wreathes left by European royal families and world governments on the lawn outside St George's Chapel

A police officer surveys the wreathes left by European royal families and world governments on the lawn outside St George’s Chapel

Police control the traffic on the road outside Windsor Castle where well-wishers and the world's media have gathered

Police control the traffic on the road outside Windsor Castle where well-wishers and the world's media have gathered

Police control the traffic on the road outside Windsor Castle where well-wishers and the world’s media have gathered

Police spotters with masks and binoculars watch the crowds as a ring of steel was formed around the castle to protect mourners

Police spotters with masks and binoculars watch the crowds as a ring of steel was formed around the castle to protect mourners

Police spotters with masks and binoculars watch the crowds as a ring of steel was formed around the castle to protect mourners

Despite warnings to stay away, crowds built up at Windsor today to say farewell to the 'grandfather of the nation'

Despite warnings to stay away, crowds built up at Windsor today to say farewell to the 'grandfather of the nation'

Despite warnings to stay away, crowds built up at Windsor today to say farewell to the ‘grandfather of the nation’

Members of the Metropolitan Police gather outside Buckingham Palace where flowers continue to be laid for the Duke of Edinburgh

Members of the Metropolitan Police gather outside Buckingham Palace where flowers continue to be laid for the Duke of Edinburgh

Members of the Metropolitan Police gather outside Buckingham Palace where flowers continue to be laid for the Duke of Edinburgh

Last night the Palace shared a touching unseen picture of the Queen with her husband, who died peacefully at the castle on Friday last week at 99

Last night the Palace shared a touching unseen picture of the Queen with her husband, who died peacefully at the castle on Friday last week at 99

Last night the Palace shared a touching unseen picture of the Queen with her husband, who died peacefully at the castle on Friday last week at 99 

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge arrive for the funeral service

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge arrive for the funeral service

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Britain’s Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge arrive for the funeral service

The Cambridges left Kensington Palace in a convoy led by police outriders from the Met's royal protection squad

The Cambridges left Kensington Palace in a convoy led by police outriders from the Met's royal protection squad

The Cambridges left Kensington Palace in a convoy led by police outriders from the Met’s royal protection squad

Windsor Castle dominates the centre of the town - but crowds are much smaller than usual due to the ongoing pandemic

Windsor Castle dominates the centre of the town - but crowds are much smaller than usual due to the ongoing pandemic

Windsor Castle dominates the centre of the town – but crowds are much smaller than usual due to the ongoing pandemic

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery arrive at Windsor Castle on a sunny afternoon where the Duke of Edinburgh will be laid to rest

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery arrive at Windsor Castle on a sunny afternoon where the Duke of Edinburgh will be laid to rest

The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery arrive at Windsor Castle on a sunny afternoon where the Duke of Edinburgh will be laid to rest

The beautiful spring scene at Buckingham Palace, Prince Philip's London home, which he famously called 'The Office' while calling Windsor 'home'

The beautiful spring scene at Buckingham Palace, Prince Philip's London home, which he famously called 'The Office' while calling Windsor 'home'

The beautiful spring scene at Buckingham Palace, Prince Philip’s London home, which he famously called ‘The Office’ while calling Windsor ‘home’

Members of The Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery are pictured on the day of the funeral of Britain's Prince Philip

Members of The Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery are pictured on the day of the funeral of Britain's Prince Philip

Members of The Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery are pictured on the day of the funeral of Britain’s Prince Philip

A view of the Cannonade from the streets of Windsor before the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

A view of the Cannonade from the streets of Windsor before the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

A view of the Cannonade from the streets of Windsor before the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

Armed Police on the Long Walk in Windsor ahead of the funeral. As with all royal gatherings, there is a tight security operation in place

The wardens of Windsor Castle stand in front of the iconic archway leading into the grounds, where HRH Prince Philip will be laid to rest

The wardens of Windsor Castle stand in front of the iconic archway leading into the grounds, where HRH Prince Philip will be laid to rest

The wardens of Windsor Castle stand in front of the iconic archway leading into the grounds, where HRH Prince Philip will be laid to rest

The overwhelming majority of people will watch the funeral from their homes, with the BBC, ITV and Sky all broadcasting live 

Early this morning members of the armed forces, police, security and the media were taking up positions around the castle ahead of this afternoon's ceremony

Early this morning members of the armed forces, police, security and the media were taking up positions around the castle ahead of this afternoon's ceremony

A visible armed forces presence will be on display, reflecting the Duke's wishes for a military rather than a state funeral

A visible armed forces presence will be on display, reflecting the Duke's wishes for a military rather than a state funeral

Early this morning members of the armed forces, police, security and the media were taking up positions around the castle ahead of this afternoon’s ceremony 

Some mourners did gather outside the Castle to pay their respects, including a man with a painting of the Duke

Some mourners did gather outside the Castle to pay their respects, including a man with a painting of the Duke

 Some mourners did gather outside the Castle to pay their respects, including a man with a painting of the Duke

Marshals have also been drafted in to help regulate the event, which is much more muted than usual royal ceremonies

Marshals have also been drafted in to help regulate the event, which is much more muted than usual royal ceremonies

Marshals have also been drafted in to help regulate the event, which is much more muted than usual royal ceremonies

Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Today, Mr Hardman said: ‘It is reduced but I don’t think it is any way diminished – the core elements are there.’

He added that it would be a service that ‘very much reflects the man – very unstuffy, unfussy’.

‘You won’t hear a eulogy or any great address – it is very much what he wanted but all the way through it are those echo of his naval career which shaped him,’ Mr Hardman said. 

Some members of the public did visit Windsor this morning, including artist Kaya Mar, 65, from south east London, who took an oil painting of Philip, which he painted last week.

He said: ‘I liked him, he was a lovely family man who will be missed. He was hard-working and dedicated to this country and I think people will finally realise his value. He was a good public servant and will be missed.’ 

Mourners also started congregating a Buckingham Palace, where a massive security operation is also underway.

All surrounding roads have been closed off with dozens of police, some of them armed, on duty. Private security guards have been stationed a police helicopter hovering above.

One officer told MailOnline that they were expecting ‘thousands’ of people to arrive. He added: ‘The funeral may be in Windsor but we’re expecting a lot of people to turn up at Buckingham Palace, as they have been through the week.

‘The sun is out and people have been very moved by Philip’s death. There’s lots of media here and we have to make sure things run smoothly because the eyes of the world are on us.’ 

The first floral tribute, at Buckingham Palace was laid by Claudia, 10, who was accompanied by her mother Chesma, 40.

Chesma revealed that she and her daughter set off from their East London home shortly after 6am and had laid yellow tulips.

She said: ‘We only moved to the UK from India 10 years ago but in that time we’ve come to love the Royal family. They represent this nation and we wanted to pay our respects to Prince Philip.’

Claudia said: ‘I really wanted to come here because I feel sorry for the Queen. She’s going to miss Prince Philip a lot as we all will.’ 

Sam Welsh, 68 who laid a bunch of yellow roses said: ‘Philip was alright, he did a good job and made me laugh. I just wanted to honour his memory and pay respect to his life.

‘He was a good bloke and I’m sure we’ll all miss him but not as much as the Queen Mother, who I really loved.’

The overwhelming majority of people will watch the funeral from their homes, with the BBC, ITV and Sky all broadcasting live.

Many have decked their living rooms with union flags in tribute and shared pictures on social media this morning.  

A member of The Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery carrying Her Majesty's insignia on his saddle

A member of The Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery carrying Her Majesty's insignia on his saddle

A member of The Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery carrying Her Majesty’s insignia on his saddle 

Police officers on a rooftop keeping watch over the surrounding area as part of the ring of steel security operation

Police officers on a rooftop keeping watch over the surrounding area as part of the ring of steel security operation

Police officers on a rooftop keeping watch over the surrounding area as part of the ring of steel security operation

Police on the estate

Police on the estate

Police officers troop through the town of Windsor this morning ahead of Philip's funeral

Police officers troop through the town of Windsor this morning ahead of Philip's funeral

Police officers troop through the town of Windsor and take up positions on the estate this morning ahead of Philip’s funeral 

In Windsor police patrols will also be stepped up to enforce Covid rules, which bans large gatherings

In Windsor police patrols will also be stepped up to enforce Covid rules, which bans large gatherings

In Windsor police patrols will also be stepped up to enforce Covid rules, which bans large gatherings

As with all royal events, there was a tight security operation and police divers were pictured searching a drain near the grounds

As with all royal events, there was a tight security operation and police divers were pictured searching a drain near the grounds

As with all royal events, there was a tight security operation and police divers were pictured searching a drain near the grounds

A man carrying flowers walks next to Windsor Castle, where at 3pm Prince Philip will be laid to rest

A man carrying flowers walks next to Windsor Castle, where at 3pm Prince Philip will be laid to rest

A man carrying flowers walks next to Windsor Castle, where at 3pm Prince Philip will be laid to rest

In Windsor police patrols will also be stepped up to enforce Covid rules, which bans large gatherings

In Windsor police patrols will also be stepped up to enforce Covid rules, which bans large gatherings

In Windsor police patrols will also be stepped up to enforce Covid rules, which bans large gatherings

Wardens stand outside Windsor Castle on the day of the funeral of Britain's Prince Philip

Wardens stand outside Windsor Castle on the day of the funeral of Britain's Prince Philip

Wardens stand outside Windsor Castle on the day of the funeral of Britain’s Prince Philip

The Duke of Edinburgh's Insignias placed on the altar in St George's Chapel, Windsor

The Duke of Edinburgh's Insignias placed on the altar in St George's Chapel, Windsor

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Insignias placed on the altar in St George’s Chapel, Windsor

Insignia belonging to the Duke of Edinburgh, the British Empire Collar and Grand Masters Badge, and the British Empire Breast Star and Badge, placed on the altar in St George's Chapel

Insignia belonging to the Duke of Edinburgh, the British Empire Collar and Grand Masters Badge, and the British Empire Breast Star and Badge, placed on the altar in St George's Chapel

Insignia belonging to the Duke of Edinburgh, the British Empire Collar and Grand Masters Badge, and the British Empire Breast Star and Badge, placed on the altar in St George’s Chapel

The Order of Merit, the Royal Victorian Chain, and Full Size Medal Group

The Order of Merit, the Royal Victorian Chain, and Full Size Medal Group

The Order of Merit, the Royal Victorian Chain, and Full Size Medal Group

A golden glow fell over the grounds of Windsor Castle this morning as dawn broke on the day HRH Prince Philip will be laid to rest

A golden glow fell over the grounds of Windsor Castle this morning as dawn broke on the day HRH Prince Philip will be laid to rest

A golden glow fell over the grounds of Windsor Castle this morning as dawn broke on the day HRH Prince Philip will be laid to rest

700 military personnel will be involved in Saturday’s funeral that was ‘decades in the planning’ before the Queen was forced to pare it back due to Covid

More than 700 military personnel will be involved in ceremony, with his beloved Royal Marines carrying his coffin, which will bear his sword and cap.

Tomorrow service detachments recognising Philip’s special military relationships will be in position in the Windsor Castle Quadrangle, as he begins his final journey.

These include the: Royal Navy; Royal Marines; Band of the Royal Marines; Royal Fleet Auxiliary; The Queen’s Royal Hussars (The Queen’s Own and Royal Irish); Grenadier, Coldstream and Welsh Guards; The Highlanders, 4th Battalion; The Royal Regiment of Scotland; Royal Gurkha Rifles; The Rifles; REME; Intelligence Corps; Royal Air Force; Guidon, Colour and Truncheon Parties and several military bands.

The Quadrangle will also be lined by the Household Cavalry, The Foot Guards and the Band of the Grenadier Guards.

Before the funeral procession sets off, the Queen will have a moment of quiet reflection when her car draws up behind the coffin at the State Entrance to the castle and pauses for a moment.

The procession will then depart, following the Land Rover as it is driven to the west steps of St George’s Chapel. But the Queen will not be required to follow it all the way down.

Instead her car will stop at the Galilee porch at the chapel, where she will be greeted by the Dean of Windsor before taking her seat inside.

On the altar will be displayed some of the duke’s regalia personally chosen by Philip himself, which will include nods to his Danish and Greek heritage. 

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Last night the Palace shared a touching unseen picture of the Queen with her husband, who died peacefully at the castle on Friday last week at 99.

It shows the couple at one of their ‘happy places’ – the Coyles of Muick hills close to Balmoral, where they enjoyed walking and picnics throughout their long lives together. The Queen so loves the place that she named her new corgi puppy after it.

The photograph – taken by their daughter-in-law the Countess of Wessex in 2003 during one of their family summer holidays – was specially chosen by Her Majesty to share ahead of today’s funeral. 

The couple look blissfully happy and relaxed as they sit back in the heather, the Queen in her off duty Scottish dress of a woollen twinset, pearls and a tartan skirt, with Philip in country casuals and a sun hat resting on his knee. 

The Queen was seen yesterday walking her puppies Muick and Fergus, a dorgi, in the gardens at Frogmore, where her grandson Prince Harry has been quarantining after flying in from the US, leading to speculation she may have greeted him from a distance.

She is said to have been ‘stoical’ about her husband’s death, and has been personally involved in the funeral preparations, including the order that senior royals wear morning dress instead of uniforms to stop tensions over what Andrew and Harry should wear.

She even found time yesterday to talk to governor general of Australia David Hurley and Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau, both of whom expressed their condolences.

Lord Chartres, a former bishop of London, today said the Queen, who will sit alone in the chapel because of Covid, would be under ‘extraordinary pressure’ during funeral.

The retired Church of England bishop, who was understood to be close to Philip, told BBC Radio 4’s Today: ‘I hope that today people really will be sending up a prayer for the Queen and for the other members of the royal family because having to grieve in public is an extraordinary pressure and something that most of us would not really want to do.

‘But it is part of their life and their world, and I hope today, and I’m sure, that people won’t forget the personal dimension in the formal ceremonies.’ 

Covid has loomed large over the funeral, with mourners reduced from around 800 to just 30, and all guests wearing face masks and sitting apart.

Boris Johnson, who gave up his place, left a wreath for the duke outside St George’s Chapel yesterday saying the nation owes ‘more than words can say’.

All those at the socially distanced service will wear masks, including the Queen. The congregation will not be able to sing and the hymns performed by a small choir of four.

The Queen will follow her husband’s coffin on his Land Rover hearse down from the castle to the chapel in her State Bentley. The Dean of Windsor, the Right Reverend David Conner, who will lead the service, will say of the duke: ‘We have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our Queen, by his service to the nation and the Commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith.’

The Archbishop of Canterbury, who will pronounce the Blessing today, said it was important for people to understand the Queen was facing the day with ‘extraordinary dignity and courage’, while saying goodbye to the most important person in her life.

He added that he hoped the nation prayed for her and ‘hope for her to find strength in what must be an anguished moment’.

No sermon will be delivered during the ceremonial royal service, in keeping with Philip’s wishes. His love of the sea and long association with the Royal Navy permeates the Order of Service, with the music chosen by the duke including the hymn Eternal Father, Strong To Save – traditionally associated with seafarers and the maritime armed services.  

Police inspect the Long Walk early this morning ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral

Police inspect the Long Walk early this morning ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral

Police inspect the Long Walk early this morning ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral 

Windsor at dawn: The eyes of the world will be on the royal residence today as the Queen says her final goodbye to the Duke of Edinburgh, her husband, strength and stay of 73 years

Windsor at dawn: The eyes of the world will be on the royal residence today as the Queen says her final goodbye to the Duke of Edinburgh, her husband, strength and stay of 73 years

Windsor at dawn: The eyes of the world will be on the royal residence today as the Queen says her final goodbye to the Duke of Edinburgh, her husband, strength and stay of 73 years

In pre-pandemic times thousands of mourners would have travelled to the Berkshire town to pay their respects, but the Royal Family, the Government and police are instructing well-wishers to stay away

In pre-pandemic times thousands of mourners would have travelled to the Berkshire town to pay their respects, but the Royal Family, the Government and police are instructing well-wishers to stay away

In pre-pandemic times thousands of mourners would have travelled to the Berkshire town to pay their respects, but the Royal Family, the Government and police are instructing well-wishers to stay away

Pictured: Windsor Castle at dawn this morning The funeral of Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip's and husband of Queen Elizabeth II is due to take place today at 3pm

Pictured: Windsor Castle at dawn this morning The funeral of Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip's and husband of Queen Elizabeth II is due to take place today at 3pm

Pictured: Windsor Castle at dawn this morning The funeral of Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip’s and husband of Queen Elizabeth II is due to take place today at 3pm

A sign of a royal guard wearing a face mask in the town of Windsor where Prince Philip's funeral will be held later today

A sign of a royal guard wearing a face mask in the town of Windsor where Prince Philip's funeral will be held later today

A sign of a royal guard wearing a face mask in the town of Windsor where Prince Philip’s funeral will be held later today 

Flowers are laid by well-wishers early this morning

Flowers are laid by well-wishers early this morning

Flowers are laid by well-wishers early this morning 

he first floral tribute, at Buckingham Palace was laid by Claudia, 10, who was accompanied by her mother Chesma, 40

he first floral tribute, at Buckingham Palace was laid by Claudia, 10, who was accompanied by her mother Chesma, 40

Chesma revealed that she and her daughter set off from their East London home shortly after 6am and had laid yellow tulips

Chesma revealed that she and her daughter set off from their East London home shortly after 6am and had laid yellow tulips

The first floral tribute, at Buckingham Palace was laid by Claudia, 10, who was accompanied by her mother Chesma, 40 (left). Sam Welsh, 68 (right) who laid a bunch of yellow roses said: ‘Philip was alright, he did a good job and made me laugh. I just wanted to honour his memory and pay respect to his life’

Mourners lay flowers at royal residences on day of Philip’s funeral 

Windsor Castle

Eight-year-old Jack Slater was one of the few to lay flowers this morning at Windsor Castle.

Accompanied by his parents Emma and Stuart, he said he got up early this morning from his home in nearby Slough to lay down the flowers.

He said :’ I wanted to pay respects to Philip. Because he’s died. ‘

Mrs Slater said :’We wanted to come here early, put some flowers down, and leave because of all the covid problems. We also wanted to respect what the Royal Family asked for, that people stay away. We will watch it at home on television.’

Ian Mawhinney, 56, said it has been a sombre period for the town, but he feels the royal family are ‘setting an example’ by limiting numbers at the event in line with Covid rules.

He said: ‘I think it’s really important to mark the event. It’s been a very sombre time for the town.

‘Living in Windsor you realise how much they do for the community and the country. You sense the loss more here. It’s been a very sombre few weeks.

‘I’m quite torn about the measures… I think the country is missing out on something. I think the royal family are setting an example. Having a small event is not what they would have wanted but they will adapt and… honour (Philip) in their own way.’

 

Buckingham Palace

Sam Welsh, 68 who laid a bunch of yellow roses said: ‘Philip was alright, he did a good job and made me laugh. I just wanted to honour his memory and pay respect to his life.

‘He was a good bloke and I’m sure we’ll all miss him but not as much as the Queen Mother, who I really loved.

‘With Philip gone it’s going to be tough for the Queen. I hope she copes OK because she’s got a difficult job.’

Chris Davies, 39 left his home in St Neots, Cambridgeshire with his son Christopher, 12 at 7am.

Chris, who was in the Royal Navy for 12 years said: ‘I wanted to pay my respects to a fellow naval man. I love the Royal family and had a lot of respect for Prince Philip.

‘We came down on the train early so that we can get home to watch the funeral on TV.’

Christopher said; ‘My dad’s told me a lot of stories about the navy and has brought me up to respect the Royal family. We wanted to come to pay my respects.’

Chris revealed that he was one of the Queen’s guards for her Jubilee celebrations in 2000.

He added: ‘I’ll always remember Prince Philip for his gaffes and sense of humour. He was quite a character, had a tendency to put his foot in it and will be missed.’

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The Prince of Wales and Princess Royal will lead the Duke of York, Earl of Wessex and other family members walking behind the duke’s coffin, carried on a Land Rover hearse he helped design, during the funeral procession which the Queen will join, travelling by car.

Royal brothers the Duke of Cambridge and Duke of Sussex, who have a troubled relationship, will not walk shoulder to shoulder but with their cousin Peter Phillips between them.

Meanwhile, the Queen has been forced to ask her family not to military uniforms to save Harry’s blushes. 

Prince Andrew asked to dress as an admiral, has stuck with royal protocol and kept Peter Phillips, her eldest grandchild, at the centre of the procession between the warring brothers. 

He is being seen by royal experts as a ‘mediator’ on the day, having supported them when their mother Diana died in 1997.

Keeping Harry and William apart will be seen by some as a missed opportunity to show family unity in the wake of Prince Philip’s death. 

Others questioned whether the princes were being kept apart deliberately at their own request, but the Royal Family has refused to discuss it. 

A Buckingham Palace spokesman said: ‘This is a funeral [and] we will not be drawn into those perceptions of drama. The arrangements have been agreed and reflect Her Majesty’s wishes.’ 

Royal biographer Hugo Vickers claimed that Peter Phillips, Philip’s eldest grandson, has been deliberately chosen to help his two younger cousins find a way forward with their relationship, which has become badly strained in the past year.

He said: ‘Peter Philips was incredibly good with the boys when Diana died, so I think it will be very good for them. 

‘Sometimes I think that when people behave very well in public, which I think they will do, they find it easier to behave better in private. Prince Philip and the Queen were conciliators all their life so I’m sure that is what he would have wanted’.

Her Majesty’s youngest son Edward, his wife Sophie and their 17-year-old daughter Lady Louise nodded to well-wishers as they drove through the gates of Windsor Castle this afternoon.

The family then stopped to inspect bouquets, notes, cards and balloons left by well-wishers mourning the death of the Queen’s husband a week ago now moved to outside St George’s Chapel.

Sophie, while looking over handwritten letters from children, could be heard saying ‘how sweet’, before speaking to her husband about the huge amount of flowers. 

They walked around for about fifteen minutes before leaving.

From the Queen to Mike Tindall: Funeral guest list 

Here is the full list of guests who will attend the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral at Windsor Castle on Saturday:

  1. The Queen
  2. The Prince of Wales
  3. The Duchess of Cornwall
  4. The Duke of Cambridge
  5. The Duchess of Cambridge
  6. The Duke of Sussex
  7. The Duke of York
  8. Princess Beatrice
  9. Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi
  10. Princess Eugenie
  11. Jack Brooksbank
  12. The Earl of Wessex
  13. The Countess of Wessex
  14. Lady Louise Windsor
  15. Viscount Severn
  16. The Princess Royal
  17. Vice Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence
  18. Peter Phillips
  19. Zara Phillips
  20. Mike Tindall
  21. Earl of Snowdon
  22. Lady Sarah Chatto
  23. Daniel Chatto
  24. Duke of Gloucester
  25. Duke of Kent
  26. Princess Alexandra
  27. Bernhard, Hereditary Prince of Baden
  28. Prince Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse
  29. Prince Philipp of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
  30. The Countess Mountbatten of Burma

Scroll down to the bottom of this article for a more detailed look at who has been confirmed as attending

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Among them were wreaths bearing messages from Boris Johnson, Nicola Sturgeon and the Royal Navy. The couple appeared touched by the tributes.

Edward inspected the tributes 24 hours after his eldest brother Charles shed tears as he did the same at Marlborough House – the home of the Commonwealth – in central London, where floral tributes laid at the gates of Buckingham Palace are brought each evening.

A wreath from Boris Johnson has paid tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh, saying the nation owes him ‘more than words can say’. 

The Prime Minister’s written message, laid outside St George’s Chapel in the grounds of Windsor Castle, read: ‘In grateful memory of a man to whom the nation owes more than words can say. Sent on behalf of the nation. From the Prime Minister’.

A wreath from Nicola Sturgeon read: ‘With deepest sympathy from the First Minister of Scotland and the Scottish Government.’

The Royal Navy’s tribute read: ‘In gratitude for an exceptional life of service from all ranks of the Royal Navy. Fair winds and following seas.’ 

This morning more tributes flooded in from personal friends of the Duke. 

The Duke of Edinburgh’s great niece has described him as the family’s ‘glue’.

Princess Xenia of Hohenlohe-Langenburg told the BBC: ‘He’s been like a glue for the family, because sadly a lot of our grandmothers passed away much too early.

‘But he was always there, he was the link, so he brought all of us cousins, even though we were in Germany – a lot of us but not all of us – he brought us all together on a lot of family occasions, the last one having been his 90th birthday celebrations 10 years ago at Windsor.

‘We were all there, there was a huge bunch of us, and it was lovely.’

Prince Hassan bin Talal of Jordan described him as a remarkable human being.

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today: ‘We were frequently guests at Sandringham and Balmoral, and in that context established a personal relationship

‘I remember saying to him, ‘How do I refer to you?’. He said, ‘Philip is a perfectly good name’.

‘I think I was very close to knowing the man, the human being, and in that sense I feel the privilege in having known not only an encyclopaedia of knowledge, but also an icon of human dignity.’

Former Buckingham Palace press secretary Charles Anson said: ‘The occasional jokes were often very much enjoyed by those to whom he was speaking, I think he rarely offended all that much.

‘I think Prince Philip’s way of breaking the ice of making a joke including people in a conversation, he was marvellous in that respect.

‘It was Prince Philip who introduced an informal remark and sometimes a joke, but actually when you look back on it very few people took offence, most people could see his sense of humour and knew he was well meaning.

‘He had all that energy and marvellous ideas, and he made great contribution and lightening the atmosphere whilst remaining a very serious figure.’  

The Earl of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers outside St George's Chapel, at Windsor Castle yesterday

The Earl of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers outside St George's Chapel, at Windsor Castle yesterday

The Earl of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers outside St George’s Chapel, at Windsor Castle yesterday

Yesterday Her Majesty, 94, drove her green Jaguar through the grounds of Windsor Castle, where the Duke of Edinburgh will be laid to rest

Yesterday Her Majesty, 94, drove her green Jaguar through the grounds of Windsor Castle, where the Duke of Edinburgh will be laid to rest

Yesterday Her Majesty, 94, drove her green Jaguar through the grounds of Windsor Castle, where the Duke of Edinburgh will be laid to rest

Pictured today, the Jaguar Land Rover that will be used to transport the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh at his funeral

Pictured today, the Jaguar Land Rover that will be used to transport the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh at his funeral

Pictured today, the Jaguar Land Rover that will be used to transport the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh at his funeral

‘We have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our Queen’: The order of service for the emotion-filled funeral of Prince Philip minute by minute

Prince Philip‘s ‘unwavering loyalty’ to the Queen and his ‘courage, fortitude and faith’ will be put at the heart of his funeral service later today.

A reduced group of 30 friends and royal family members are set to gather at St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle this afternoon to mark the death of the long-standing royal, at the age of 99.  

Ahead of the 3pm funeral, an order of service, crafted personally by Prince Philip, has been released. 

It sets out the details of the 50-minute service, which will include hymns and readings chosen by the Duke. There will also be a full nod to the Prince’s naval heritage.

Philip was closely associated with the Navy for more than 80 years, having enrolled at Britannia Royal Naval College in Dartmouth aged 17. 

He served at sea during the Second World War – earning a mention in despatches for his bravery – and later held numerous honorary ranks.

Trust Philip to do his own flypast! Soaring solo over the very spot he will be laid to rest, how the Duke of Edinburgh would truly like to be remembered 

Soaring over Windsor Castle, this is the Duke of Edinburgh performing his own flypast of the mighty royal fortress.

The photograph shows Philip, then 31, flying solo on the day he was presented with his RAF wings nearly seven decades ago.

He began flying lessons in November 1952 and made his first solo flight in December that year.

Soaring over Windsor Castle, this is the Duke of Edinburgh performing his own flypast of the mighty royal fortress (pictured)

Soaring over Windsor Castle, this is the Duke of Edinburgh performing his own flypast of the mighty royal fortress (pictured)

Soaring over Windsor Castle, this is the Duke of Edinburgh performing his own flypast of the mighty royal fortress (pictured)

The photograph of him above Windsor in a Harvard Advanced Trainer, an American aircraft, was taken on May 4, 1953, by his instructor Flight Lieutenant Caryl Ramsay Gordon.

The five stars on the fuselage signified his rank of Marshal of the Royal Air Force, to which he had been appointed that year.

He made three solo circuits and landings at White Waltham airfield in Berkshire, about nine miles from Windsor, that day, which was a month before the Queen’s coronation.

He then returned to Buckingham Palace, where he was awarded his wings by then Chief of the Air Staff Air Chief Marshal Sir William Dickson.

An RAF examining unit described his flying as ‘thoughtful with a sense of safety and airmanship above average’.

The picture, originally black and white, is retouched in colour here.

It has been shared on the Royal Family’s official Twitter page in its original format with the caption: ‘He gained his RAF wings in 1953, his helicopter wings in 1956 and his private pilot’s licence in 1959.’

 

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Among the hymns will be the well-known Victorian hymn Eternal Father, Strong To Save – a religious song sometimes known as the hymn for the Royal Navy. 

It will be sung by a choir of just four at St George’s Chapel due to Covid regulations.

The hymn is strongly associated with the Navy in the UK, but is also popular with the naval traditions of countries like the US and France.

The first verse of the hymn paints a dramatic picture of divine help needed for those who find themselves in trouble on the waters.

The stirring lyrics and music were written by two English ministers – William Whiting providing the words and John B Dykes composing the music.

Philip, a guiding force behind the arrangements for his funeral, also picked a wide range of music from Johann Sebastian Bach to Ralph Vaughan Williams.

The Jubilate in C was written by Benjamin Britten at the duke’s request around 1961 and has gone on to become a staple in cathedrals and churches across the country.

Funeral guests will also hear the choir sing Psalm 104 which was set to music by guitarist and composer William Lovelady.

Originally composed as a cantata in three movements, it was first sung in honour of the duke’s 75th birthday in 1996.

Before the service, a selection of music chosen by the duke will be played – Sir William Harris’s Adagio Espressivo (Sonata in A minor), Percy Whitlock’s Salix (The Plymouth Suite) and Berceuse (Op 31 No. 19) by Louis Vierne.

Bach’s choral prelude Schmucke Dich, O Liebe Seele (Adorn Yourself, O Dear Soul) BWV 654 will also be performed along with Vaughan Williams’ Rhosymedre.

The small choir of four will be conducted by the St George’s Chapel director of music James Vivian and the organ will be played by Luke Bond.

After the duke’s coffin is lowered into the royal vault a Lament will be played by a Pipe Major from the Royal Regiment of Scotland. The duke was Royal Colonel of the Highlanders, 4th Battalion, the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

The Last Post will be sounded by buglers of the Royal Marines and, after a period of silence, the Reveille will be played by the State Trumpeters of the Household Cavalry.

Philip served as Captain General of the Royal Marines for more than six decades and at the end of the service the buglers will sound ‘Action Stations’.

It is played on a warship to signal all hands should go to battle stations and is sometimes featured at funerals of naval men.

As the service draws to a close the Archbishop of Canterbury will pronounce the Blessing and the National Anthem will be sung by just the choir.

And, in accordance with the Duke’s wishes, the service will not contain a sermon nor a eulogy. It will also not be a state funeral – another request made by Prince Philip prior to his death.  

The service will be conducted by David Conner, the Dean of Windsor, who during the proceedings will praise Philip’s ‘kindness, humour and humanity’. 

During the service, he will say: ‘We have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our Queen, by his service to the Nation and the Commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith.

‘Our lives have been enriched through the challenges that he has set us, the encouragement that he has given us, his kindness, humour and humanity.’

Here, ahead of the funeral, is the order of service in full, as set out by Buckingham Palace

Prince Philip's (pictured: Prince Philip at St George's Chapel during an interview with Robert Hardman) in 'unwavering loyalty' to the Queen and his 'courage, fortitude and faith' will be put at the heart of his funeral service later today

Prince Philip's (pictured: Prince Philip at St George's Chapel during an interview with Robert Hardman) in 'unwavering loyalty' to the Queen and his 'courage, fortitude and faith' will be put at the heart of his funeral service later today

Prince Philip’s (pictured: Prince Philip at St George’s Chapel during an interview with Robert Hardman) in ‘unwavering loyalty’ to the Queen and his ‘courage, fortitude and faith’ will be put at the heart of his funeral service later today

Philip Mountbatten and the then Princess Elizabeth Windsor on their wedding day in November 1947. She would become Queen six years later in June 1953

Philip Mountbatten and the then Princess Elizabeth Windsor on their wedding day in November 1947. She would become Queen six years later in June 1953

Philip Mountbatten and the then Princess Elizabeth Windsor on their wedding day in November 1947. She would become Queen six years later in June 1953

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip together during the Golden Jubilee Celebrations for Her Majesty in June 2002

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip together during the Golden Jubilee Celebrations for Her Majesty in June 2002

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip together during the Golden Jubilee Celebrations for Her Majesty in June 2002

Flowers outside St George's Chapel, at Windsor Castle, Berkshire, following the death of the Duke of Edinburgh at the age of 99

Flowers outside St George's Chapel, at Windsor Castle, Berkshire, following the death of the Duke of Edinburgh at the age of 99

Flowers outside St George’s Chapel, at Windsor Castle, Berkshire, following the death of the Duke of Edinburgh at the age of 99

ORDER OF SERVICE

All stand. The coffin is removed from the Land Rover and is carried to the West Steps, where it rests at 3pm for the one-minute National Silence.

The coffin is then carried to the catafalque in the Quire.

Members of the Royal Family who have walked in the procession are conducted to their places in the Quire.

Meanwhile, the choir sings:

THE SENTENCES

I am the resurrection and the life, saith the Lord: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die.

John 11. 25-26

I know that my redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth: and though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God: Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another.

Job 19. 25-27

We brought nothing into this world, and it is certain we can carry nothing out. The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord.

1 Timothy 6. 7, Job 1. 21

William Croft (1678–1727)

All remain standing. The Dean of Windsor shall say:

THE BIDDING

The music before the service 

During the service, a choir of four singers (three of whom are Lay Clerks of St George’s Chapel Choir) will be conducted by James Vivian and the organ will be played by Luke Bond.

Music before the service

Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele BWV 654

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)

Adagio espressivo (Sonata in A minor)

Sir William Harris (1883–1973)

Salix (The Plymouth Suite)

Percy Whitlock (1903–1946)

Berceuse (Op 31 No 19)

Louis Vierne (1870–1937)

Rhosymedre (Three Preludes founded on Welsh Hymn Tunes)

Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872–1958)

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We are here today in St George’s Chapel to commit into the hands of God the soul of his servant Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. With grateful hearts, we remember the many ways in which his long life has been a blessing to us. We have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our Queen, by his service to the Nation and the Commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith. Our lives have been enriched through the challenges that he has set us, the encouragement that he has given us, his kindness, humour and humanity. We therefore pray that God will give us grace to follow his example, and that, with our brother Philip, at the last, we shall know the joys of life eternal.

All sit. The choir sings:

Eternal Father, strong to save,

Whose arm doth bind the restless wave,

Who bidd’st the mighty ocean deep

Its own appointed limits keep;

O hear us when we cry to thee

For those in peril on the sea.

O Saviour, whose almighty word

The winds and waves submissive heard,

Who walkedst on the foaming deep,

And calm amid its rage didst sleep:

O hear us when we cry to thee

For those in peril on the sea.

O sacred Spirit, who didst brood

Upon the chaos dark and rude,

Who bad’st its angry tumult cease,

And gavest light and life and peace:

O hear us when we cry to thee

For those in peril on the sea.

O Trinity of love and power,

Our brethren shield in danger’s hour;

From rock and tempest, fire and foe,

Protect them whereso’er they go:

And ever let there rise to thee

Glad hymns of praise from land and sea.

William Whiting (1825–78)

Melita by JB Dykes (1823–76)

Arranged by James Vivian (b 1974)

All remain seated.

THE FIRST LESSON

Ecclesiasticus 43. 11–26

Read by the Dean of Windsor

Look at the rainbow and praise its Maker; it shines with a supreme beauty, rounding the sky with its gleaming arc, a bow bent by the hands of the Most High. His command speeds the snow storm and sends the swift lightning to execute his sentence. To that end the storehouses are opened, and the clouds fly out like birds. By his mighty power the clouds are piled up and the hailstones broken small. The crash of his thunder makes the earth writhe, and, when he appears, an earthquake shakes the hills. At his will the south wind blows, the squall from the north and the hurricane. He scatters the snow-flakes like birds alighting; they settle like a swarm of locusts. The eye is dazzled by their beautiful whiteness, and as they fall the mind is entranced. He spreads frost on the earth like salt, and icicles form like pointed stakes. A cold blast from the north, and ice grows hard on the water, settling on every pool, as though the water were putting on a breastplate. He consumes the hills, scorches the wilderness, and withers the grass like fire. Cloudy weather quickly puts all to rights, and dew brings welcome relief after heat. By the power of his thought he tamed the deep and planted it with islands. Those who sail the sea tell stories of its dangers, which astonish all who hear them; in it are strange and wonderful creatures, all kinds of living things and huge sea-monsters. By his own action he achieves his end, and by his word all things are held together.

All remain seated as the choir sings:

THE JUBILATE

O be joyful in the Lord, all ye lands:

serve the Lord with gladness,

and come before his presence with a song.

Be ye sure that the Lord he is God:

it is he that hath made us, and not we ourselves;

we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.

O go your way into his gates with thanksgiving,

and into his courts with praise:

be thankful unto him, and speak good of his Name.

For the Lord is gracious, his mercy is everlasting:

and his truth endureth from generation to generation.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son: and to the Holy Ghost;

As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be:

world without end. Amen.

Benjamin Britten (1913–76), in C

Written for St George’s Chapel, Windsor at the request of The Duke of Edinburgh

All remain seated.

THE SECOND LESSON

John 11. 21–27

Read by the Archbishop of Canterbury

Martha said to Jesus, ‘Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died. And even now I know that whatever you ask from God, God will give you.’ Jesus said to her, ‘Your brother will rise again.’ Martha said to him, ‘I know that he will rise again in the resurrection at the last day.’ Jesus said to her, ‘I am the resurrection and the life; he who believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and whoever lives and believes in me shall never die. Do you believe this?’ She said to him, ‘Yes, Lord; I believe that you are the Christ, the Son of God, he who is coming into the world.’

All remain seated as the choir sings:

Psalm 104

The Duke of Edinburgh requested that Psalm 104 should be set to music by William Lovelady.

Originally composed as a cantata in three movements, it was first sung in honour of His Royal Highness’s 75th Birthday.

My soul give praise unto the Lord of heaven,

In majesty and honour clothed;

The earth he made will not be moved,

The seas he made to be its robe. Give praise.

The waters rise above the highest mountain,

And flow down to the vales and leas;

At springs, wild asses quench their thirst,

And birds make nest amid the trees.

The trees the Lord has made are full of vigour,

The fir tree is a home for storks;

Wild goats find refuge in the hills,

From foes the conies shelter in the rocks.

My soul give praise unto the Lord of heaven,

In majesty and honour clothed;

The earth he made will not be moved,

The seas he made to be its robe. Give praise.

O Lord, how manifold is your creation,

All things in wisdom you provide;

You give your riches to the earth,

And to the sea so great and wide.

You take your creatures’ breath and life is ended,

Your breath goes forth and life begins;

Your hand renews the face of earth,

Your praise my whole life I will sing.

My soul give praise unto the Lord of heaven,

In majesty and honour clothed;

The earth he made will not be moved,

The seas he made to be its robe. Give praise.

Words from Psalm 104, adapted by Sam Dyer (b 1945)

William Lovelady (b 1945), abridged and arranged for choir and organ by James Vivian (b 1974) with the composer’s permission

The choir sings:

THE LESSER LITANY

Let us pray.

All sit or kneel.

Lord, have mercy upon us.

Christ, have mercy upon us.

Lord, have mercy upon us.

THE LORD’S PRAYER

Our Father, which art in heaven,

Hallowed be thy Name;

Thy kingdom come;

Thy will be done in earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our trespasses,

As we forgive them that trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation;

But deliver us from evil. Amen.

THE RESPONSES

Enter not into judgement with thy servant, O Lord.

For in thy sight shall no man living be justified.

Grant unto him eternal rest.

And let light perpetual shine upon him.

We believe verily to see the goodness of the Lord.

In the land of the living.

O Lord, hear our prayer.

And let our cry come unto thee.

William Smith (1603-45), adapted by Roger Judd, MVO (b 1944)

The Lord’s Prayer, Music by Robert Stone (1516-1613) from John Day’s Certaine Notes 1565

THE COLLECT

The Dean of Windsor shall say:

O merciful God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who is the resurrection and the life; in whom whosoever believeth shall live, though he die; and whosoever liveth, and believeth in him, shall not die eternally; who also hath taught us by his Holy Apostle Saint Paul, not to be sorry, as men without hope, for them that sleep in him: We meekly beseech thee, O Father that, when we shall depart this life, we may rest in him, as our hope is this our brother doth; and that, at the general resurrection in the last day, we may be found acceptable in thy sight; and receive that blessing, which thy well-beloved Son shall then pronounce to all that love and fear thee, saying, Come ye blessed children of my Father; receive the kingdom prepared for you from the beginning of the world. Grant this we beseech thee, O merciful Father through Jesus Christ, our Mediator and Redeemer. Amen.

THE PRAYERS

The Archbishop of Canterbury shall say:

O eternal God, before whose face the generations rise and pass away, thyself unchanged, abiding, we bless thy holy name for all who have completed their earthly course in thy faith and following, and are now at rest; we remember before thee this day Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, rendering thanks unto thee – for his resolute faith and loyalty, for his high sense of duty and integrity, for his life of service to the Nation and Commonwealth, and for the courage and inspiration of his leadership. To him, with all the faithful departed, grant thy peace; let light perpetual shine upon them; and in thy loving wisdom and almighty power work in them the good purpose of thy perfect will; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Dean of Windsor, Register of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, shall say:

O Lord, who didst give to thy servant Saint George grace to lay aside the fear of man, and to be faithful even unto death: Grant that we, unmindful of worldly honour, may fight the wrong, uphold thy rule, and serve thee to our lives’ end; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

God save our gracious Sovereign and all the Companions, living and departed, of the Most Honourable and Noble Order of The Garter. Amen.

O God of the spirits of all flesh, we praise thy holy name for thy servant Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, who has left us a fair pattern of valiant and true knighthood; grant unto him the assurance of thine ancient promise that thou wilt ever be with those who go down to the sea in ships and occupy their business in great waters. And we beseech thee that, following his good example and strengthened by his fellowship, we may at the last, together with him, be partakers of thy heavenly kingdom; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Archbishop of Canterbury shall say:

O Lord God, when thou givest to thy servants to endeavour any great matter, grant us also to know that it is not the beginning, but the continuing of the same unto the end, until it be thoroughly finished, which yieldeth the true glory; through him, who for the finishing of thy work laid down his life, our Redeemer, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Almighty God, Father of all mercies and giver of all comfort: Deal graciously, we pray thee, with those who mourn; that casting every care on thee they may know the consolation of thy love; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

All sit as the choir sings:

THE ANTHEM

Give rest, O Christ, to thy servant with thy Saints:

where sorrow and pain are no more;

neither sighing, but life everlasting.

Thou only art immortal, the Creator and Maker of man:

And we are mortal, formed of the earth, and unto earth shall we return.

For so thou didst ordain, when thou createdest me, saying,

Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.

All we go down to the dust; and, weeping, o’er the grave,

we make our song: Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia.

Russian Kontakion of the Departed

Translated William John Birkbeck (1859–1916)

Kiev Melody, arranged by Sir Walter Parratt, KCVO (1841–1924)

All stand.

As the coffin is lowered into the Royal Vault, the Dean of Windsor shall say:

THE COMMENDATION

Go forth upon thy journey from this world, O Christian soul,

In the name of God the Father Almighty who created thee;

In the name of Jesus Christ who suffered for thee;

In the name of the Holy Spirit who strengtheneth thee;

May thy portion this day be in peace,

and thy dwelling in the heavenly Jerusalem. Amen.

All remain standing. Garter Principal King of Arms proclaims:

THE STYLES AND TITLES OF HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE PRINCE PHILIP, DUKE OF EDINBURGH

Thus it hath pleased Almighty God to take out of this transitory life unto his divine mercy the late most Illustrious and most Exalted Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth and Baron Greenwich, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Member of the Order of Merit, Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order upon whom had been conferred the Royal Victorian Chain, Grand Master and Knight Grand Cross of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Lord High Admiral of the United Kingdom, One of Her Majesty’s Most Honourable Privy Council, Admiral of the Fleet, Field Marshal in the Army and Marshal of the Royal Air Force, Husband of Her Most Excellent Majesty Elizabeth the Second by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of Her other Realms and Territories, Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith, Sovereign of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, whom may God preserve and bless with long life, health and honour and all worldly happiness.

Thereafter, the Pipe Major of The Royal Regiment of Scotland plays:

A LAMENT

The Buglers of the Royal Marines sound.

THE LAST POST

After a period of silence the State Trumpeters of the Household Cavalry sound.

REVEILLE

The Buglers of the Royal Marines sound.

ACTION STATIONS

Then the Archbishop of Canterbury pronounces:

THE BLESSING

All remain standing as the choir sings:

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM

God save our gracious Queen,

Long live our noble Queen,

God save The Queen!

Send her victorious,

Happy and glorious,

Long to reign over us,

God save The Queen!

All remain standing in their places as Her Majesty The Queen, members of the Royal Family and members of the Duke of Edinburgh’s family leave the Chapel via the Galilee Porch escorted by the Dean of Windsor and the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Music after the service

Luke Bond, Assistant Director of Music, St George’s Chapel, will play Prelude and Fugue in C minor, BWV 546, Johann Sebastian Bach.

Son of Falklands hero Colonel ‘H’ Jones is among pallbearers carrying Philip’s coffin led by Grenadier Guard whose grandfather was an officer at Queen’s coronation

The son of a hero of the Falklands War is among the group of senior officers who will carry Prince Philip on his final journey today.

Deputy Colonel Commandant of The Rifles, Major General Rupert Jones, is the son of Herbert ‘H’ Jones, who was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross by the Queen for his heroism in the face of battle with the Argentinians in 1982.

Major General Jones will also be joined as a pallbearer by Lt Alec Heywood,  a Grenadier Guard whose grandfather served at both the funeral of George VI and the Queen’s coronation. He will be in command of the bearer party carrying Prince Philip’s coffin.

H Jones, as he was known to all his comrades, was killed as he led the 2nd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, into battle on the occupied British islands in the south Atlantic. He was mortally wounded by machine gun fire as he personally led the attack near Goose Green. 

His son, Major General Jones, is a leading office in The Rifles. Philip, who served heroically in the Royal Navy during the Second World War was Colonel-in-Chief of the regiment, one of 42 appointments he enjoyed in the British armed forces and the Commonwealth.  

Pallbearer Deputy Colonel Commandant of The Rifles, Major General Rupert Jones

Pallbearer Deputy Colonel Commandant of The Rifles, Major General Rupert Jones

Deputy Colonel Commandant of The Rifles, Major General Rupert Jones, is the son of Herbert 'H' Jones, who was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross by the Queen for his heroism in the face of battle with the Argentinians in 1982.

Deputy Colonel Commandant of The Rifles, Major General Rupert Jones, is the son of Herbert 'H' Jones, who was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross by the Queen for his heroism in the face of battle with the Argentinians in 1982.

Pallbearer Deputy Colonel Commandant of The Rifles, Major General Rupert Jones (left), is the son of Herbert ‘H’ Jones (right), who was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross by the Queen for his heroism in the face of battle with the Argentinians in 1982.

Prince Philip lifts his hat during his final public engagement in 2017 with his beloved Royal Marines, whose leaders will help carry Philip's coffin today

Prince Philip lifts his hat during his final public engagement in 2017 with his beloved Royal Marines, whose leaders will help carry Philip's coffin today

Prince Philip lifts his hat during his final public engagement in 2017 with his beloved Royal Marines, whose leaders will help carry Philip’s coffin today

The Jaguar Land Rover that will be used to transport the coffin of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, at his funeral. He helped design it himself

The Jaguar Land Rover that will be used to transport the coffin of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, at his funeral. He helped design it himself

The Jaguar Land Rover that will be used to transport the coffin of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, at his funeral. He helped design it himself

Lt Alec Heywood will lead the unit from The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards as it moves the coffin from Windsor Castle’s private chapel to the inner hall before the start of the funeral procession. 

As a third generation Grenadier Guard Lt Heywood’s family have a long history of service in the British Army. His grandfather captained The Queen’s Company at George VI’s funeral and the Queen’s Coronation in 1953. 

Lieutenant Alec Heywood, a third generation Grenadier Guard, will command the Grenadier Guards bearer party. His grandfather was the captain of The Queen’s Company at George VI’s funeral in 1952 and the Queen’s Coronation a year later.   

The Duke of Edinburgh’s beloved Royal Marines will accompany his funeral on its final journey.

Commandant General Royal Marines Major General Matthew Holmes will also walk alongside the hearse during the procession. 

Philip’s first major appointment after his naval career ended in 1953 was as commander of the marines. His grandson Prince Harry took the role in 2017 until the Queen stripped him of all his titles when he quit as a frontline royal with his wife Meghan Markle.

Other pallbearers include Brigadier Ian Mortimer, Colonel of The Queen’s Royal Hussars, Lieutenant General Roland ‘Roly’ Walker, Regimental Lieutenant Colonel of the Grenadier Guards, and Brigadier James Roddis, Deputy Colonel of The Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Lieutenant General Paul Jaques, Master General of the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME), the regiment who helped Philip design his Land Rover hearse, will also help carry the coffin, as will Lieutenant General Sir James Hockenhull, Colonel Commandant of the Intelligence Corps, and Group Captain Nick Worrall, Station Commander RAF Northolt Group.  

Commandant General Royal Marines Major General Matthew Holmes will also walk alongside the hearse during the procession.

Commandant General Royal Marines Major General Matthew Holmes will also walk alongside the hearse during the procession.

Group Captain Nick Worrall, Station Commander RAF Northolt Group, will also accompany the coffin

Group Captain Nick Worrall, Station Commander RAF Northolt Group, will also accompany the coffin

Commandant General Royal Marines Major General Matthew Holmes will also walk alongside the hearse during the procession. Group Captain Nick Worrall, Station Commander RAF Northolt Group, will also accompany the coffin

The British army's Lt. Gen. Paul Jaques (centre), Master General of the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME), the regiment who helped Philip design his Land Rover hearse, will also help carry the coffin

The British army's Lt. Gen. Paul Jaques (centre), Master General of the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME), the regiment who helped Philip design his Land Rover hearse, will also help carry the coffin

The British army’s Lt. Gen. Paul Jaques (centre), Master General of the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME), the regiment who helped Philip design his Land Rover hearse, will also help carry the coffin

Other pallbearers include Brigadier Ian Mortimer, Colonel of The Queen's Royal Hussars, Lieutenant General Roland 'Roly' Walker,

Other pallbearers include Brigadier Ian Mortimer, Colonel of The Queen's Royal Hussars, Lieutenant General Roland 'Roly' Walker,

Lieutenant General Sir James Hockenhull, Colonel Commandant of the Intelligence Corps

Lieutenant General Sir James Hockenhull, Colonel Commandant of the Intelligence Corps

Other pallbearers include Brigadier Ian Mortimer (left), Colonel of The Queen’s Royal Hussars, Lieutenant General Roland ‘Roly’ Walker, and Lieutenant General Sir James Hockenhull (right), Colonel Commandant of the Intelligence Corps

Military duties begin hours before the funeral at 3pm on Saturday afternoon, with Philip’s coffin – covered with his personal standard and surmounted with his sword, naval cap and a wreath of flowers – moved at 11am by a Bearer Party found by The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, from the private chapel to the inner hall of Windsor Castle.

By 2.15pm, the service detachments recognising Philip’s special military relationships will be in position in the Quadrangle, which will also be lined by the Household Cavalry and The Foot Guards.

The Band of the Grenadier Guards, of which Philip was Colonel for 42 years, will lead the procession to St George’s Chapel.

They will be followed by the Major General’s Party, and then the Service Chiefs, which will include the Chief of the Air Staff, Naval Staff and Defence Staff.

Philip had a distinguished career in the Royal Navy and while he gave up active service in 1951, he remained closely connected to it and other military elements throughout his public life.

The coffin, transported from the castle to the chapel in a specially-modified Land Rover Philip helped to design, will be flanked by pallbearers drawn from the duke’s special relationships – the Royal Marines, regiments, corps and air stations.

The route of the procession will be lined by representatives drawn from the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines, the Highlanders, 4th Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland and the RAF.

Minute Guns will be fired by The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery from the East Lawn for the duration of the procession and a Curfew Tower Bell will sound.

As the procession approaches Horseshoe Cloister, the Band of the Grenadier Guards will stop playing and march through into Denton’s Commons.

The Rifles Guard of Honour, positioned in Horseshoe Cloister, will give a royal salute and the national anthem will be played.

In tribute to Philip’s Naval service, a Royal Naval Piping Party of 1 Chief Petty Officer and 5 Ratings will be present.

The piping party will pipe the ‘Still’ once the Land Rover is stationery at the foot of the steps.

A bearing party of Royal Marines will carry the coffin up the steps and pause for a minute’s silence.

The Archbishop of Canterbury and the Dean of Windsor will receive the coffin.

Inside the chapel, Philip’s insignia – the medals and decorations conferred on him by the UK and Commonwealth countries – together with his Field Marshal’s baton, Royal Air Force Wings, and insignia from Denmark and Greece, will be pre-positioned on cushions on the altar.

The Last Post will be sounded by buglers of the Royal Marines from the west end of the Nave.

Buglers of the Royal Marines will sound Action Stations during the service at the duke’s request.

It is played on a warship to signal all hands should go to battle stations and is sometimes featured at funerals of naval men.

Members of the royal family will not wear military uniform, but instead the royal men will wear morning coats with their medals while the women will wear day dresses.

She’s left Buckingham Palace for Windsor, is allotting mementoes from Philip to family, writing to friends on black-rimmed cards… and a ‘soft’ new regency by Charles has already begun. RICHARD KAY’s remarkable portrait of Her Majesty as a widow

They had spent their last weeks ‘reminiscing like mad’, sifting through family photographs and old cine camera film which the duke had had digitised.

Mostly they just chatted, especially after Philip‘s return from hospital when his failing health meant he slept for much of the day.

Only once did they seriously disagree when the Queen suggested they might look at some of her husband’s oil paintings. Philip firmly refused.

But for the Covid pandemic which had brought them together in a protective bubble at Windsor, these precious moments might have been denied to them. Until last year, they had almost got used to not being together.

One day, not long after Prince Philip’s retirement and when he was living alone at Wood Farm on the Sandringham estate, the Queen had remarked to one of her Windsor staff: ‘Do you know, I haven’t seen him for six weeks.’

They had spent their last weeks 'reminiscing like mad', sifting through family photographs and old cine camera film which the duke had had digitised, writes RICHARD KAY of the Queen and Prince Philip

They had spent their last weeks 'reminiscing like mad', sifting through family photographs and old cine camera film which the duke had had digitised, writes RICHARD KAY of the Queen and Prince Philip

They had spent their last weeks ‘reminiscing like mad’, sifting through family photographs and old cine camera film which the duke had had digitised, writes RICHARD KAY of the Queen and Prince Philip

Anyone who reaches the Queen's great age must brace themselves for personal loss. And it is certainly true that she had been preparing herself for some time for the day Philip would no longer be there — not that it made it any easier when that moment came on Friday of last week

Anyone who reaches the Queen's great age must brace themselves for personal loss. And it is certainly true that she had been preparing herself for some time for the day Philip would no longer be there — not that it made it any easier when that moment came on Friday of last week

Anyone who reaches the Queen’s great age must brace themselves for personal loss. And it is certainly true that she had been preparing herself for some time for the day Philip would no longer be there — not that it made it any easier when that moment came on Friday of last week 

Anyone who reaches the Queen’s great age must brace themselves for personal loss. 

And it is certainly true that she had been preparing herself for some time for the day Philip would no longer be there — not that it made it any easier when that moment came on Friday of last week.

For so long that phrase ‘my husband and I’ had been synonymous with the Queen and the loyal consort always at her side. 

Now, and for the rest of her life, she will reign alone — and many wonder what kind of monarch she will be for these twilight years of this second Elizabethan age.

The last widow on the throne was Queen Victoria but she was just 42 when Prince Albert died and for several years grief turned her into a virtual recluse.

As keenly as Philip’s death is felt, there will be no such lengthy period of public sorrowing for the Queen. Indeed there is every chance she will resume official engagements sooner rather than later.

But as we are discovering this will be a form of royal mourning unlike any other. 

Earlier this week the Queen returned to duty to pay a formal farewell to her lord chamberlain of the past 15 years, Earl Peel, when he returned his instruments of office.

And yesterday she carried out two more engagements on Commonwealth business, an electronic audience with the Canadian premier Justin Trudeau and the Governor-General of Australia, David Hurley.

There will be change, however. Much will depend on Prince Charles and Prince William who already have accumulated many of the Queen’s duties and will take on more. 

Charles, for example, is now keeping an eye on the running of the Duchy of Lancaster, the ancient estate of land, property and other assets from which the Queen’s private income derives.

One day, not long after Prince Philip's retirement and when he was living alone at Wood Farm on the Sandringham estate, the Queen had remarked to one of her Windsor staff: 'Do you know, I haven't seen him for six weeks'

One day, not long after Prince Philip's retirement and when he was living alone at Wood Farm on the Sandringham estate, the Queen had remarked to one of her Windsor staff: 'Do you know, I haven't seen him for six weeks'

One day, not long after Prince Philip’s retirement and when he was living alone at Wood Farm on the Sandringham estate, the Queen had remarked to one of her Windsor staff: ‘Do you know, I haven’t seen him for six weeks’

Now, and for the rest of her life, she will reign alone — and many wonder what kind of monarch she will be for these twilight years of this second Elizabethan age

Now, and for the rest of her life, she will reign alone — and many wonder what kind of monarch she will be for these twilight years of this second Elizabethan age

Now, and for the rest of her life, she will reign alone — and many wonder what kind of monarch she will be for these twilight years of this second Elizabethan age

As keenly as Philip's death is felt, there will be no such lengthy period of public sorrowing for the Queen. Indeed there is every chance she will resume official engagements sooner rather than later

As keenly as Philip's death is felt, there will be no such lengthy period of public sorrowing for the Queen. Indeed there is every chance she will resume official engagements sooner rather than later

As keenly as Philip’s death is felt, there will be no such lengthy period of public sorrowing for the Queen. Indeed there is every chance she will resume official engagements sooner rather than later 

Both the Prince of Wales and his son have also been involved in the so-called ‘bridge meetings’ with senior palace staff who are overseeing this next chapter in the Queen’s life.

One thing is certain: Windsor now will become the centre of royal life. 

Staff have been told that the castle will be the Queen’s permanent home (barring Christmas holidays at Sandringham and summers in Balmoral) and that while she will return to work at Buckingham Palace, it is unlikely she will ever spend another night there. 

Queen finds comfort with her corgis: Monarch is seen for first time since Philip’s death as she drives to Frogmore Gardens to take her two new puppies for a walk on eve of his funeral

The Queen drew comfort ahead of her husband’s funeral by walking her corgi and her dorgi this afternoon as it was revealed she is ‘bearing up well’ despite grieving Philip after 73 years of marriage.

Her Majesty, 94, who was seen for the first time since his death, drove her green Jaguar X-type through the grounds of Windsor Castle, where the Duke of Edinburgh will be laid to rest at St George’s Chapel tomorrow.

In a poignant scene, a single Queen’s Guard stood to attention as the monarch drove away with her two puppies from the castle towards Frogmore Gardens, close to where her grandson Prince Harry is believed to be self-isolating at Frogmore Cottage.

It came as an emotional Prince Edward, his wife Sophie and their 17-year-old daughter Lady Louise Windsor arrived at Windsor to support the Queen and inspect floral tributes left for Prince Philip by mourners outside the church where he will be laid to rest tomorrow.

MailOnline can reveal that Her Majesty is ‘bearing up well’ as today she personally signs-off on the final preparations for her husband’s funeral having ordered William and Harry not to walk shoulder to shoulder behind their grandfather’s coffin when he is laid to rest.

The estranged brothers are both in the small party of close family members – all male apart from Princess Anne – who will follow the Duke of Edinburgh’s body, but they will be separated by their cousin, Peter Phillips, on the eight minute walk from Windsor Castle to church.

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If weekly audiences with the Prime Minister are permitted post-Covid to resume, this means Mr Johnson will have to travel from Downing Street to Windsor, while ambassadors and high commissioners may also have to present their official credentials there too.

But to smooth diplomatic channels this is one function that with the greater authority conferred on Charles, he may take over and handle himself from Buckingham Palace. 

One thing the Queen won’t do is step down in favour of her son; there are no plans for a regency. 

But the virus which forced the Queen and Prince Philip to retreat from public life for long periods shielding at Windsor with a small staff known as HMS Bubble, has meant adjustments.

Tellingly it was Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall who carried out the first royal engagement this year, visiting a hospital named after his mother. 

Was this the beginning, perhaps of a soft regency in which the Queen does not technically stand down but Charles takes on ever more of her responsibilities?

In one of his few public comments on this controversial issue the prince has insisted his mother should only retire in the event of mental or physical incapacity. 

‘Queen Victoria in her 80s was much loved, more known, more revered than at any time in her reign,’ he told the writer Kenneth Harris. ‘Much would have been lost had she stepped back before her prime.’

He might easily have been talking about his mother. As for the Queen, the constitutional expert Dr Robert Morris once said: ‘As long as she can raise her hand or twitch an eyebrow, that should be enough.’ 

And in the sunset of her reign it is certainly the case that she has seemed more accessible, more witty and more wise than perhaps at any time.

Nothing illustrated her unique ability to divine the mood of the nation better than that televised broadcast she made in March last year with the country gripped by fear of the pandemic.

Her message of reassurance and calm was down to her innate sense — born of long experience — of what to do and say. 

And then there is humour. Just the other day she brought laughter to a group of scientists during a Zoom meeting after they asked her what Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, was like when she met him 60 years ago. 

‘Russian,’ she deadpanned before breaking into a smile.

Inevitably, with the death of Philip, Britain is tiptoeing towards thoughts of a new reign.

The funeral today, choreographed by her late husband but tweaked by the Queen to avoid rancour – the instruction for mourners not to wear military uniforms to avoid a furore over Prince Harry, for example – will reflect that changing order.

For the Queen Philip's absence will be profound. In the days and weeks ahead the goodwill and gratitude that people feel for her personally after nearly 70 years on the throne will perhaps be her greatest comfort

For the Queen Philip's absence will be profound. In the days and weeks ahead the goodwill and gratitude that people feel for her personally after nearly 70 years on the throne will perhaps be her greatest comfort

 For the Queen Philip’s absence will be profound. In the days and weeks ahead the goodwill and gratitude that people feel for her personally after nearly 70 years on the throne will perhaps be her greatest comfort

One thing is certain: Windsor now will become the centre of royal life. Staff have been told that the castle will be the Queen's permanent home

One thing is certain: Windsor now will become the centre of royal life. Staff have been told that the castle will be the Queen's permanent home

One thing is certain: Windsor now will become the centre of royal life. Staff have been told that the castle will be the Queen’s permanent home 

While she will return to work at Buckingham Palace, it is unlikely she will ever spend another night there

While she will return to work at Buckingham Palace, it is unlikely she will ever spend another night there

While she will return to work at Buckingham Palace, it is unlikely she will ever spend another night there 

The funeral today, choreographed by her late husband but tweaked by the Queen to avoid rancour – the instruction for mourners not to wear military uniforms to avoid a furore over Prince Harry, for example – will reflect that changing order

The funeral today, choreographed by her late husband but tweaked by the Queen to avoid rancour – the instruction for mourners not to wear military uniforms to avoid a furore over Prince Harry, for example – will reflect that changing order

The funeral today, choreographed by her late husband but tweaked by the Queen to avoid rancour – the instruction for mourners not to wear military uniforms to avoid a furore over Prince Harry, for example – will reflect that changing order 

The minute-by-minute arrangements for Prince Philip's funeral on Saturday have been revealed and are shown above, starting at 11am and finishing just after 3pm

The minute-by-minute arrangements for Prince Philip's funeral on Saturday have been revealed and are shown above, starting at 11am and finishing just after 3pm

The minute-by-minute arrangements for Prince Philip’s funeral on Saturday have been revealed and are shown above, starting at 11am and finishing just after 3pm

Intriguingly, over the course of lockdown many of Her Majesty’s private papers have been brought from London to Windsor and this will now include personal possessions.

For the next month at least the Queen will draw on a supply of black-edged writing paper for all her correspondence, in line with royal tradition, and just as she did after the death of the Queen Mother in 2002.

There will be a lot of letters of condolence to acknowledge. The postbag is said by staff to be huge and growing every day.

She will wear black clothes and observe court mourning — but not for long. One idea among courtiers is of an exhibition to highlight the Duke of Edinburgh’s contribution to the life of the nation. 

This could mean those fabled oils he was reluctant to look at again being put on show.

What won’t change, of course, will be the royal in-tray. 

The fallout from Harry and Meghan’s departure from royal life amid their incendiary claims of racism and the unsettling future of Prince Andrew over his friendship with the sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

Even after his retirement and unwillingness to be directly involved, Philip was a consoling figure in all these dramas.

Sustained by her deep faith, she will doubtless be a study in regal composure throughout today’s sad event. 

Although she has spoken to her children and grandchildren this week, she has spent much of the time alone.

For the next month at least the Queen will draw on a supply of black-edged writing paper for all her correspondence, in line with royal tradition, and just as she did after the death of the Queen Mother in 2002

For the next month at least the Queen will draw on a supply of black-edged writing paper for all her correspondence, in line with royal tradition, and just as she did after the death of the Queen Mother in 2002

For the next month at least the Queen will draw on a supply of black-edged writing paper for all her correspondence, in line with royal tradition, and just as she did after the death of the Queen Mother in 2002

But this has been her choice and it has allowed her to have moments of prayer in the private chapel, barely a minute’s walk down the Green Corridor from her rooms, where Philip’s coffin has rested.

For now everything is as it was just over a week ago. But in time there will be activity in the suite of rooms which adjoins her as an inventory is compiled of her husband’s property, uniforms and clothes. 

‘I think she will want to keep a lot of familiar things in place which seems only natural,’ says a source.

Practical as ever Philip had handled much of this sorting out himself in recent years, checking through papers he felt should go to the Windsor archive and destroying those that should not.

‘He always said she must carry on and I am sure that is exactly what she will do,’ says a lady in waiting. 

There are bequests to arrange, special mementoes that Philip has left not just for his children and grandchildren but also for members of his German family, who will be represented at the funeral.

Princess Anne, for example, is said to have been earmarked a painting of her with her father during a Cowes regatta week. 

There will be decisions to take over Philip’s devoted servants who the Queen acknowledges made her husband’s final years the comfortable retirement he had deserved. 

Some will retire while others will be offered positions elsewhere in the royal household.

And when it comes to conducting herself, there is a template, that of the Queen Mother.

She, of course, was a widow at 52 with decades of life ahead of her. The loss of her husband also meant the surrendering of her status as Queen and the trappings of monarchy.

One of the first things she did was to buy her own home, the Castle of Mey, which became a refuge in her grief. 

Then at the urging of her daughter, who so badly needed her guidance and of the then Prime Minister Winston Churchill, the Queen Mother put aside personal desolation to continue with her life of service and duty. 

Somehow it seems unlikely Boris Johnson will be asking the Queen to resume work. She will do so anyway.

But on a personal level, Philip’s death robs her of the man who was not just her husband, confidant and wise counsel but also her gatekeeper. 

‘Who now will protect her when Prince Andrew comes asking for more money?’ says one of her long time aides.

‘When the Queen complained out loud of her children, ‘Why do they always bring their troubles to me?’ Philip always stepped in.’

Theirs was a relationship quite unlike any other. When her children and adult grandchildren come to call, it is always with formality — a kiss and a curtsy or a bow, even in private. Only Philip put his arm around her.

In this last year, brought together because of the covid crisis and before Philip’s most recent illness, they were as close as they had been for years.

For one palace aide who found himself called in to wait on the couple because of staff shortages caused by the pandemic, it was an eye-opener. 

‘They bickered with one another. It was sweet but so unexpected. On one occasion I heard the duke say ‘Oh do shut up you silly woman’ and the Queen replied ‘I am not a silly woman, I am the Queen!’

‘I couldn’t believe my ears but I was told this was how they always were with one another.’

Often at this time of year, a week ahead of her birthday, the Queen liked to slip away from the formality of Windsor for Highclere Castle, where Downton Abbey was filmed, to stay with Jean, the dowager Countess of Carnarvon.

Often at this time of year, a week ahead of her birthday, the Queen liked to slip away from the formality of Windsor for Highclere Castle, where Downton Abbey was filmed, to stay with Jean, the dowager Countess of Carnarvon

Often at this time of year, a week ahead of her birthday, the Queen liked to slip away from the formality of Windsor for Highclere Castle, where Downton Abbey was filmed, to stay with Jean, the dowager Countess of Carnarvon

Often at this time of year, a week ahead of her birthday, the Queen liked to slip away from the formality of Windsor for Highclere Castle, where Downton Abbey was filmed, to stay with Jean, the dowager Countess of Carnarvon

But her death two years ago was one of a number of close friends who have passed away in recent times. 

In the past year alone she has lost Lady Mary Colman and Lady Elizabeth Anson, both cousins and both close friends, and Lady Vestey, Prince Harry’s godmother.

Two new companions, a gift from a family member, however, have become close friends — her dogs Fergus, a corgi-dachshund cross and Muick, a pure bred corgi, pronounced Mick and named after a loch on the Balmoral estate.

Later today if she is not too tired she will don headscarf and raincoat and take the dogs for a short walk. For years it has been her way of coping with domestic misfortune and great unhappiness.

Constitutionally the death of Prince Philip changes nothing. His death is not the end of a reign even if it does, momentarily, feel like it. 

But it does signal the start of a change. Losing your beloved partner of 73 years would be a blow for anyone let alone a woman of almost 95 who has to go on being monarch.

For the Queen Philip’s absence will be profound. In the days and weeks ahead the goodwill and gratitude that people feel for her personally after nearly 70 years on the throne will perhaps be her greatest comfort.

 

Land Rover hearse that Philip designed himself: Open top Defender TD5 130 was custom built to Duke’s orders at manufacturer’s Solihull factory in 16-year project – including new coat of military green paint

For 16 years Prince Philip tinkered and toiled on a secret project he knew he would never live to see used – the hearse to carry his own coffin.

Now, two days before his funeral on Saturday, the custom-made Land Rover designed by the Duke has been unveiled for the first time.

His work on the bespoke Land Rover Defender TD5 130 chassis cab begun in 2003, the year he turned 82, and was finished aged 98 in 2019.

The open-top rear has been modified to fit his coffin and equipped with special rubber grips on silver pins – known as the ‘stops’ – to keep it secure while it makes the journey through Windsor to St George’s Chapel.  

A military man to his core, Philip also requested the original Belize Green paintwork was changed to Dark Bronze Green like those used by the armed forces. 

Now, two days before his funeral on Saturday, the custom-made Land Rover designed by the Duke has been unveiled for the first time

Now, two days before his funeral on Saturday, the custom-made Land Rover designed by the Duke has been unveiled for the first time

Now, two days before his funeral on Saturday, the custom-made Land Rover designed by the Duke has been unveiled for the first time

The Land Rover Defender hearse that will carry Philip's coffin is seen for the first time as it is driven into Windsor Castle today

The Land Rover Defender hearse that will carry Philip's coffin is seen for the first time as it is driven into Windsor Castle today

The Land Rover Defender hearse that will carry Philip’s coffin is seen for the first time as it is driven into Windsor Castle today

His work on the bespoke Land Rover Defender TD5 130 chassis cab begun in 2003, the year he turned 82, and was finished aged 98 in 2019

His work on the bespoke Land Rover Defender TD5 130 chassis cab begun in 2003, the year he turned 82, and was finished aged 98 in 2019

His work on the bespoke Land Rover Defender TD5 130 chassis cab begun in 2003, the year he turned 82, and was finished aged 98 in 2019

The open top rear has been modified to fit his coffin and equipped with special rubber grips on silver pins - known as the 'stops' - to keep it secure while it makes the journey through Windsor to St George's Chapel

The open top rear has been modified to fit his coffin and equipped with special rubber grips on silver pins - known as the 'stops' - to keep it secure while it makes the journey through Windsor to St George's Chapel

The open top rear has been modified to fit his coffin and equipped with special rubber grips on silver pins – known as the ‘stops’ – to keep it secure while it makes the journey through Windsor to St George’s Chapel

For 16 years Prince Philip tinkered and toiled on a secret project he knew he would never live to see used - the hearse to carry his own coffin

For 16 years Prince Philip tinkered and toiled on a secret project he knew he would never live to see used - the hearse to carry his own coffin

For 16 years Prince Philip tinkered and toiled on a secret project he knew he would never live to see used – the hearse to carry his own coffin

The military green repaint was one of many modifications Philip made to the vehicle, that was first built a the manufacturer’s Solihull factory.  

With heavy duty wheels and angular structure, the sturdy design stands testament to the Duke’s penchant for engineering and functionality. 

Indeed, Jaguar Land Rover’s chief executive has admired Philip’s handiwork, hailing his ‘impressive knowledge and deep interest in vehicle design, engineering and manufacturing’. 

Land Rover has maintained the vehicle since it was built and has prepared it for the funeral in collaboration with the Royal Household.

Chief executive Thierry Bollore said: ‘We are deeply privileged to have enjoyed a very long and happy association with the Duke of Edinburgh over many decades.

‘We are also honoured that the Land Rover which the duke designed will be used at the funeral on Saturday.

‘The duke was a tremendous champion for design, engineering and technology.

‘During his visits to our sites he engaged with hundreds of employees and demonstrated his impressive knowledge and deep interest in vehicle design, engineering and manufacturing.

‘The duke was a truly remarkable man and will be greatly missed.’

The military green repaint was one of many modifications Philip made to the vehicle, that was first built a the manufacturer's Solihull factory

The military green repaint was one of many modifications Philip made to the vehicle, that was first built a the manufacturer's Solihull factory

The military green repaint was one of many modifications Philip made to the vehicle, that was first built a the manufacturer’s Solihull factory

Details on the vehicle include matching green hubs, a black front grille, a single cab and no registration plates

Details on the vehicle include matching green hubs, a black front grille, a single cab and no registration plates

Details on the vehicle include matching green hubs, a black front grille, a single cab and no registration plates

With heavy duty wheels and angular structure, the sturdy design stands testament to the Duke's penchant for engineering and functionality

With heavy duty wheels and angular structure, the sturdy design stands testament to the Duke's penchant for engineering and functionality

With heavy duty wheels and angular structure, the sturdy design stands testament to the Duke’s penchant for engineering and functionality

Details on the vehicle include matching green hubs, a black front grille, a single cab and no registration plates. 

The Duke used Land Rovers throughout his adult life and granted his Royal Warrant to Land Rover over 40 years ago.

He visited Jaguar Land Rover’s manufacturing facilities on numerous occasions over the decades and accompanied the Queen when she opened Jaguar Land Rover’s new Engine Manufacturing Centre in Wolverhampton in 2014.

The Land Rover’s original role would also have been to transport the duke 22 miles from Wellington Arch in central London to Windsor, but the coronavirus pandemic curtailed the long-held plans for military parades in honour of Philip through the streets of both the capital and the Berkshire town.

It will be flanked by pall bearers reflecting the duke’s special relationships with the military, the Royal Marines, Regiments, Corps and Air Stations.

Palace officials have told how the duke’s interest in design sparked his desire to make the Land Rover and include it in his funeral plans, codenamed Operation Forth Bridge.

Two Land Rovers were made for ‘belt and braces’ in case a backup was needed. 

Prince Philip will become 25th Royal in a 200-year-old vault hidden below St George’s Chapel in Windsor before he is moved to King George VI Memorial Chapel when the Queen dies

Prince Philip will become the 25th Royal in the 200-year-old vault hidden beneath St George’s Chapel in Windsor when he is buried.

The Duke of Edinburgh, who died last Friday aged 99, will join a range of kings and queens behind a set of iron gates around 16ft underground.

Among the notables already there include George III, George IV, George V of Hanover and William IV.

Others who are also buried there are Queen Victoria’s father Prince Edward, George III’s wife Queen Charlotte and Queen Mary’s grandfather Prince Adolphus.

His coffin will be lowered into the Royal Vault at around 3pm and will stay there until the Queen dies.

When Her Majesty’s time comes, they will join George VI and Queen Elizabeth in the King George VI Memorial Chapel.

The Duke of Edinburgh, who died last Friday aged 99, will join a range of kings and queens behind a set of iron gates around 16ft underground

The Duke of Edinburgh, who died last Friday aged 99, will join a range of kings and queens behind a set of iron gates around 16ft underground

The Duke of Edinburgh, who died last Friday aged 99, will join a range of kings and queens behind a set of iron gates around 16ft underground

Others who are also buried there are Queen Victoria's father Prince Edward, George III's wife Queen Charlotte and Queen Mary's grandfather Prince Adolphus

Others who are also buried there are Queen Victoria's father Prince Edward, George III's wife Queen Charlotte and Queen Mary's grandfather Prince Adolphus

Others who are also buried there are Queen Victoria’s father Prince Edward, George III’s wife Queen Charlotte and Queen Mary’s grandfather Prince Adolphus

When Her Majesty's time comes, they will join George VI and Queen Elizabeth in the King George VI Memorial Chapel (pictured)

When Her Majesty's time comes, they will join George VI and Queen Elizabeth in the King George VI Memorial Chapel (pictured)

When Her Majesty’s time comes, they will join George VI and Queen Elizabeth in the King George VI Memorial Chapel (pictured)

The Duke of Edinburgh (pictured in 2014) will be buried on Saturday afternoon at around 3pm

The Duke of Edinburgh (pictured in 2014) will be buried on Saturday afternoon at around 3pm

The Duke of Edinburgh (pictured in 2014) will be buried on Saturday afternoon at around 3pm

Who are the other 24 buried in the royal vault below St George’s Chapel?

  1. Princess Amelia, daughter of George III (d.1810)
  2. Princess Augusta, Duchess of Brunswick, sister of George III (d.1813)
  3. Stillborn son of Princess Charlotte(d. 1817)
  4. Princess Charlotte (daughter of George IV) (d.1817)
  5. Queen Charlotte, wife of George III (d.1818)
  6. Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria (d.1820)
  7. King George III (d.1820)
  8. Prince Alfred, son of George III (d.1782, placed in vault 1820)
  9. Prince Octavius, son of George III (d.1783, placed in vault 1820)
  10. Princess Elizabeth, daughter of William IV (d.1821)
  11. Prince Frederick, Duke of York (d.1827)
  12. King George IV (d.1830)
  13. Still-born daughter of Prince Ernest Augustus, son of George III (d.1818)
  14. King William IV (d.1837)
  15. Princess Sophia, daughter of George III (d.1840)
  16. Queen Adelaide, wife of William IV (d.1849)
  17. Prince Frederick of Schleswig-Holstein, son of Princess Christian (d.1876)
  18. King George V of Hanover (d.1878)
  19. Victoria von Pawel Rammingen, daughter of Princess Frederica of Hanover (d.1881)
  20. Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck, mother of Queen Mary (d.1897)
  21. Prince Francis, Duke of Teck, father of Queen Mary (d.1900)
  22. Princess Frederika of Hanover (d.1926)
  23. Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, grandfather of Queen Mary (d.1850, placed in vault 1930)
  24. Princess Augusta, Duchess of Cambridge, grandmother of Queen Mary (d.1889, placed in vault 1930)
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This was erected between 1968 and 1969 and is situated next to the north quire aisle in the building.

Near there is a slab of black-and-white diamond-shaped stones which is taken away for funerals to gain access to a lift.

Royals’ coffins are taken down the shaft for about 16ft before going down a corridor and set down in the vault behind iron gates.

Earlier monarchs were laid to rest in Westminster Abbey, where they still lie in a royal vault under the Henry VII Chapel.

But it quickly filled up and George III was forced to commission a new one under the Albert Memorial Chapel in Windsor in 1810.

His daughter Princess Amelia, who died aged 27 that year, was placed in a temporary vault until the new one was ready.

She was followed seven years later by Princess Charlotte and her child before George III and his son the Duke of Kent joined them in 1820.

By this time there were 12 low tombs in the vault that were around 18 inches high and a few feet across.

Monarchs and their wives went in the centre and there was more shelving for others on York stone.

Next came George IV in 1830, then William IV in 1937, Queen Adelaide in 1849 and George V of Hanover in 1878.

The latter was Queen Victoria’s cousin and ended up in the vault because Hanover did not want him.

Some royals chose to spend time in the vault to reflect on the life of their loved one.

After George III’s daughter Princess Augusta Sophia was put there in 1840, it was reported: ‘We understand that in the course of yesterday His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge and his son Prince George descended into the royal vault, and stayed there some time contemplating the remains of their deceased relatives.’

This process was eased when a stone staircase was put in behind the altar in about 1837.

Victoria is understood to have frequently gone in after the Duke of Albany died in 1884 – and was followed by others.

He stayed there until he was transferred to the Albert Memorial Chapel in the summer of 1885.

After he brother prince Francis of Teck died in 1911, Queen Mary said: ”The vault looks very nice now, and is well lighted and arranged.

Among the notables already there include George III, George IV, George V of Hanover and William IV. Pictured: King Edward II and Queen Alexandra in the chapel

Among the notables already there include George III, George IV, George V of Hanover and William IV. Pictured: King Edward II and Queen Alexandra in the chapel

Among the notables already there include George III, George IV, George V of Hanover and William IV. Pictured: King Edward II and Queen Alexandra in the chapel

The Duke of Edinburgh will join them all on Saturday afternoon before being moved to the King George VI Memorial Chapel when the Queen dies

The Duke of Edinburgh will join them all on Saturday afternoon before being moved to the King George VI Memorial Chapel when the Queen dies

The Duke of Edinburgh will join them all on Saturday afternoon before being moved to the King George VI Memorial Chapel when the Queen dies

‘The King [Edward VII] lies on the stone in the centre for the present.’

But the storage problem reemerged in towards the end of the 1920s, with only about 24 slots left.

Queen Elizabeth’s grandfather George V used land next to Victoria’s Mausoleum at Frogmore in Windsor to build the Royal Burial Ground in 1928.

This has become the main place to bury royals, with the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester among those there.

George V, George VI and Queen Mary went in the royal vault while George VI placed in his special chapel in 1969.

Prince Philip’s mother Princess Alice of Battenberg, who was born at Windsor Castle in 1885, also went in when she died in 1969.

The Duke of Edinburgh will join them all on Saturday afternoon before being moved to the King George VI Memorial Chapel when the Queen dies.

The bodies of her parents, George VI and the Queen Mother, as well as the ashes of her sister, Princess Margaret, are interred here.

Link hienalouca.com

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