Dawn breaks over Windsor on day of Prince Philip’s funeral

A golden glow fell over the grounds of Windsor Castle this morning as dawn broke on the day HRH Prince Philip will be laid to rest. 

The eyes of the world will be on the royal residence today as the Queen says her final goodbye to the Duke of Edinburgh, her husband, strength and stay of 73 years.

In pre-pandemic times thousands of mourners would have travelled to the Berkshire town to pay their respects, but the Royal Family, the Government and police are asking well-wishers to stay away.

Early this morning members of the armed forces, police, security and the media were taking up positions around the Castle ahead of this afternoon’s service.

While much of the typical regal pageantry has been pared back, Buckingham Palace says it will still reflect the plans the Duke himself spent years fine-tuning. 

Right down to the bespoke Land Rover hearse to carry his own coffin, the event will be executed with Philip’s characteristic military precision leading up to the 3pm service at St George’s Chapel.   

The Queen, 94, will say a private farewell to her husband before his body is driven to the chapel tailed by a small procession including his four children and three grandsons. 

Sources say she has been the ‘epitome of dignity’ this week, and the Archbishop of Canterbury paid tribute to her ‘extraordinary dignity and courage’.

Justin Welby, who will praise Philip’s ‘life of service to the nation and Commonwealth’ at the service, added that he hoped the nation prayed for her and ‘hope for her to find strength in what must be an anguished moment’.

As the Queen prepared to lead the nation in mourning: 

  • No planes will land or take off at nearby Heathrow for six minutes to coincide with the minute’s silence;
  • Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby will praise Philip’s ‘life of service to the nation and Commonwealth’ at the service;
  • The Order of Service, released by the Palace last night, reflects Philip’s naval roots, including the seafarers’ hymn Eternal Father, Strong To Save;
  • The Earl and Countess of Wessex, with their daughter Lady Louise, appeared touched by tributes left in memory of the duke when they viewed cards and flowers at Windsor Castle.
A golden glow fell over the grounds of Windsor Castle this morning as dawn broke on the day HRH Prince Philip will be laid to rest

A golden glow fell over the grounds of Windsor Castle this morning as dawn broke on the day HRH Prince Philip will be laid to rest

A golden glow fell over the grounds of Windsor Castle this morning as dawn broke on the day HRH Prince Philip will be laid to rest

The eyes of the world will be on the royal residence today as the Queen says her final goodbye to the Duke of Edinburgh, her husband, strength and stay of 73 years

The eyes of the world will be on the royal residence today as the Queen says her final goodbye to the Duke of Edinburgh, her husband, strength and stay of 73 years

The eyes of the world will be on the royal residence today as the Queen says her final goodbye to the Duke of Edinburgh, her husband, strength and stay of 73 years

In pre-pandemic times thousands of mourners would have travelled to the Berkshire town to pay their respects, but the Royal Family, the Government and police are instructing well-wishers to stay away

In pre-pandemic times thousands of mourners would have travelled to the Berkshire town to pay their respects, but the Royal Family, the Government and police are instructing well-wishers to stay away

In pre-pandemic times thousands of mourners would have travelled to the Berkshire town to pay their respects, but the Royal Family, the Government and police are instructing well-wishers to stay away

The royal couple are photographed as they are rarely seen - relaxing together away from public duties and enjoying the stunning scenery of the Scottish Highlands

The royal couple are photographed as they are rarely seen - relaxing together away from public duties and enjoying the stunning scenery of the Scottish Highlands

The royal couple are photographed as they are rarely seen – relaxing together away from public duties and enjoying the stunning scenery of the Scottish Highlands

Pictured: Windsor Castle at dawn this morning The funeral of Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip's and husband of Queen Elizabeth II is due to take place today at 3pm

Pictured: Windsor Castle at dawn this morning The funeral of Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip's and husband of Queen Elizabeth II is due to take place today at 3pm

Pictured: Windsor Castle at dawn this morning The funeral of Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip’s and husband of Queen Elizabeth II is due to take place today at 3pm

Early this morning members of the armed forces, police, security and the media were taking up positions around the Castle ahead of this afternoon's service

Early this morning members of the armed forces, police, security and the media were taking up positions around the Castle ahead of this afternoon's service

Early this morning members of the armed forces, police, security and the media were taking up positions around the Castle ahead of this afternoon’s service

Right down to the bespoke Land Rover hearse to carry his own coffin, the event will be executed with the Duke's characteristic military precision leading up to the 3pm service at St George's Chape

Right down to the bespoke Land Rover hearse to carry his own coffin, the event will be executed with the Duke's characteristic military precision leading up to the 3pm service at St George's Chape

Right down to the bespoke Land Rover hearse to carry his own coffin, the event will be executed with the Duke’s characteristic military precision leading up to the 3pm service at St George’s Chape

This is the funeral procession for tomorrow's funeral, where William and Harry will not stand next to eachother with the Queen following behind in her car

This is the funeral procession for tomorrow's funeral, where William and Harry will not stand next to eachother with the Queen following behind in her car

This is the funeral procession for tomorrow’s funeral, where William and Harry will not stand next to eachother with the Queen following behind in her car

From the Queen to Mike Tindall: Funeral guest list 

Here is the full list of guests who will attend the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral at Windsor Castle on Saturday:

  1. The Queen
  2. The Prince of Wales
  3. The Duchess of Cornwall
  4. The Duke of Cambridge
  5. The Duchess of Cambridge
  6. The Duke of Sussex
  7. The Duke of York
  8. Princess Beatrice
  9. Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi
  10. Princess Eugenie
  11. Jack Brooksbank
  12. The Earl of Wessex
  13. The Countess of Wessex
  14. Lady Louise Windsor
  15. Viscount Severn
  16. The Princess Royal
  17. Vice Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence
  18. Peter Phillips
  19. Zara Phillips
  20. Mike Tindall
  21. Earl of Snowdon
  22. Lady Sarah Chatto
  23. Daniel Chatto
  24. Duke of Gloucester
  25. Duke of Kent
  26. Princess Alexandra
  27. Bernhard, Hereditary Prince of Baden
  28. Prince Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse
  29. Prince Philipp of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
  30. The Countess Mountbatten of Burma

Scroll down to the bottom of this article for a more detailed look at who has been confirmed as attending

<!—->

Advertisement

Buckingham Palace has shared a touching unseen picture of the Queen with her husband, who died peacefully at the castle on Friday last week at 99.

It shows the couple at one of their ‘happy places’ – the Coyles of Muick hills close to Balmoral, where they enjoyed walking and picnics throughout their long lives together. The Queen so loves the place that she named her new corgi puppy after it.

The photograph – taken by their daughter-in-law the Countess of Wessex in 2003 during one of their family summer holidays – was specially chosen by Her Majesty to share ahead of today’s funeral. 

The couple look blissfully happy and relaxed as they sit back in the heather, the Queen in her off duty Scottish dress of a woollen twinset, pearls and a tartan skirt, with Philip in country casuals and a sun hat resting on his knee.

The duke’s coffin, draped in his personal standard and bearing his naval cap, sword and a wreath of flowers, will first be seen at 2.41pm today when it emerges from the State Entrance to Windsor Castle carried by a bearer party from The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

It will then be placed on the Land Rover hearse that Philip personally designed for the occasion for the eight-minute journey to the chapel, followed by a procession of nine family members. 

The Queen was seen yesterday walking her puppies Muick and Fergus, a dorgi, in the gardens at Frogmore, where her grandson Prince Harry has been quarantining after flying in from the US, leading to speculation she may have greeted him from a distance.

She is said to have been ‘stoical’ about her husband’s death, and has been personally involved in the funeral preparations, including the order that senior royals wear morning dress instead of uniforms to stop tensions over what Andrew and Harry should wear.

She even found time yesterday to talk to governor general of Australia David Hurley and Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau, both of whom expressed their condolences.

Today’s funeral service will be for just 30 mourners – the maximum under Covid restrictions. Boris Johnson, who gave up his place, left a wreath for the duke outside St George’s Chapel yesterday saying the nation owes ‘more than words can say’.

All those at the socially distanced service will wear masks, including the Queen. The congregation will not be able to sing and the hymns performed by a small choir of four.

The Queen will follow her husband’s coffin on his Land Rover hearse down from the castle to the chapel in her State Bentley. The Dean of Windsor, the Right Reverend David Conner, who will lead the service, will say of the duke: ‘We have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our Queen, by his service to the nation and the Commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith.’

The Archbishop of Canterbury, who will pronounce the Blessing today, said it was important for people to understand the Queen was facing the day with ‘extraordinary dignity and courage’, while saying goodbye to the most important person in her life.

He added that he hoped the nation prayed for her and ‘hope for her to find strength in what must be an anguished moment’.

Meanwhile, the Queen has been forced to ask her family not to military uniforms to save Harry’s blushes. 

Prince Andrew asked to dress as an admiral, has stuck with royal protocol and kept Peter Phillips, her eldest grandchild, at the centre of the procession between the warring brothers. 

He is being seen by royal experts as a ‘mediator’ on the day, having supported them when their mother Diana died in 1997.

Keeping Harry and William apart will be seen by some as a missed opportunity to show family unity in the wake of Prince Philip’s death. 

Others questioned whether the princes were being kept apart deliberately at their own request, but the Royal Family has refused to discuss it. 

A Buckingham Palace spokesman said: ‘This is a funeral [and] we will not be drawn into those perceptions of drama. The arrangements have been agreed and reflect Her Majesty’s wishes.’ 

Today royal biographer Hugo Vickers claimed that Peter Phillips, Philip’s eldest grandson, has been deliberately chosen to help his two younger cousins find a way forward with their relationship, which has become badly strained in the past year.

He said: ‘Peter Philips was incredibly good with the boys when Diana died, so I think it will be very good for them. 

‘Sometimes I think that when people behave very well in public, which I think they will do, they find it easier to behave better in private. Prince Philip and the Queen were conciliators all their life so I’m sure that is what he would have wanted’.

Her Majesty’s youngest son Edward, his wife Sophie and their 17-year-old daughter Lady Louise nodded to well-wishers as they drove through the gates of Windsor Castle this afternoon.

The family then stopped to inspect bouquets, notes, cards and balloons left by well-wishers mourning the death of the Queen’s husband a week ago now moved to outside St George’s Chapel.

Sophie, while looking over handwritten letters from children, could be heard saying ‘how sweet’, before speaking to her husband about the huge amount of flowers. 

A sea of flowers outside St George's Chapel, at Windsor Castle, Berkshire, where Philip will be laid to rest tomorrow

A sea of flowers outside St George's Chapel, at Windsor Castle, Berkshire, where Philip will be laid to rest tomorrow

A sea of flowers outside St George’s Chapel, at Windsor Castle, Berkshire, where Philip will be laid to rest tomorrow

The Earl of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers outside St George's Chapel, at Windsor Castle

The Earl of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers outside St George's Chapel, at Windsor Castle

The Earl of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers outside St George’s Chapel, at Windsor Castle

Her Majesty, 94, drove her green Jaguar through the grounds of Windsor Castle, where the Duke of Edinburgh will be laid to rest at St George's Chapel tomorrow

Her Majesty, 94, drove her green Jaguar through the grounds of Windsor Castle, where the Duke of Edinburgh will be laid to rest at St George's Chapel tomorrow

Her Majesty, 94, drove her green Jaguar through the grounds of Windsor Castle, where the Duke of Edinburgh will be laid to rest at St George’s Chapel tomorrow

They walked around for about fifteen minutes before leaving.

Among them were wreaths bearing messages from Boris Johnson, Nicola Sturgeon and the Royal Navy. The couple appeared touched by the tributes.

Edward inspected the tributes 24 hours after his eldest brother Charles shed tears as he did the same at Marlborough House – the home of the Commonwealth – in central London, where floral tributes laid at the gates of Buckingham Palace are brought each evening.

A wreath from Boris Johnson has paid tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh, saying the nation owes him ‘more than words can say’. 

The Prime Minister’s written message, laid outside St George’s Chapel in the grounds of Windsor Castle, read: ‘In grateful memory of a man to whom the nation owes more than words can say. Sent on behalf of the nation. From the Prime Minister’.

A wreath from Nicola Sturgeon read: ‘With deepest sympathy from the First Minister of Scotland and the Scottish Government.’

The Royal Navy’s tribute read: ‘In gratitude for an exceptional life of service from all ranks of the Royal Navy. Fair winds and following seas.’ 

It came as details of Philip’s royal ceremonial funeral, which will take place at 3pm tomorrow, were publicly released. 

These included:

  • The Queen will wear a mask, sit socially-distanced from her family and follow the coffin of her husband of 73 years in the state Bentley;
  • The 30-strong congregation comprises of all of Philip’s children and grandchildren, their spouses and close relatives including Princess Margaret’s son the Earl of Snowdon;
  • The only non-family member of the group is his close friend and carriage driving companion Countess Mountbatten of Burma, Penny Knatchbull;
  • Other royals including the Duchess of Kent have not been invited after Covid rules meant a 1,000-name list was whittled down;
  • The Land Rover hearse specially designed by the duke to carry his coffin was unveiled.

William and Harry, 36, were last seen in public together at a Commonwealth Day service in March last year where they could barely look each other in the eye following Harry and Meghan’s acrimonious split from the Royal Family.

Relations were further soured by the couple’s explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey last month, in which they attacked senior royals while Philip, who died on Friday aged 99, lay in hospital.

It had been quietly hoped that the loss of their beloved grandfather, who both men loved deeply, might start the process of rapprochement.

Tomorrow is likely to be particularly difficult for the brothers as it will evoke memories of having to walk behind their mother’s coffin when they were just 15 and 13. 

In Windsor today, security was stepped as the castle town went into final preparations for tomorrow’s funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh.

Dozens of security officials were stationed alongside police armed with machine guns as appeals were made for the public to stay away.

Those that did attend to place flowers on the gates of Windsor Castle were asked to remove all the wrappings and told that their tributes would be taken away at the end of the day.

Thousands flocked to pay their respects and among them was Professor Chris Imafidon who met Phillip in 2003 when the Royal visited Queen Mary University in East London.

Wearing the Duke’s image on his face mask, the message imprinted on it said: ‘His energy his enthusiasm and his commitment to the British people is now going to be lacking. 

‘I don’t know who can step into that position I don’t think that anyone can replace him.’

He added: ‘I was nervous about meeting him but he made me feel so relaxed straight away. 

‘I told him I was nervous because I was a foreigner and he was a member of the British Royal family. But he said to me ‘I am Greek, I’m a foreigner and I’m a refugee too!’

‘I have come to pay my respects because he was such a wonderful person. He was all about education, emancipation, empowerment and equality. He will be missed by many, many people.’

Dance teacher Carole Hellewell, 60, from Farnham, said: ‘I was here on Sunday and it was very busy. I’ve put some flowers down then.

‘I’ve come back with my husband David because our friends in Canada and America asked us to lay some tribute for them too. It’s a very, very sad time and I think Prince Phillip’s death will be felt by millions all over the world.’

Publican Robert Gillespie, 62, who runs the Two Brewers Pub next to the castle, has decorated his establishment in red white and blue flowers to mark the princes death.

He said: ‘I used to see him when he would drive his horse and carriage down here from the Royal Mees towards the Long Walk and he would always give me a wave.

‘I’ll be closing the pub tomorrow or the day of his funeral also to pay respects to him.’

On the castle entrance facing the Long Walk, lines of flowers had been placed.

One message said: ‘To a brilliant and lovely Queen. We are sorry that your beloved husband has died. We hope you are well. Keep smiling.’

Another message read: ‘We hope you find comfort in all the wonderful memories you’ll have of all your times together. And you can continue to smile as he would want you to.’

William and Harry will be among nine family members who will walk behind Philip’s coffin, leaving the Sovereign’s entrance at Windsor Castle at 2.45pm.

William, 38, and Harry will walk in the third row of mourners, with their cousin Peter Phillips in between them, behind the Queen’s four children.

The procession will be led by the Prince of Wales and his sister, Princess Anne, followed by Prince Edward and Prince Andrew.

Behind William and Harry will be Princess Anne’s husband, Tim Laurence, and Philip’s nephew, the Earl of Snowdon, with staff bringing up the rear.

A palace spokesman said the Queen had been forced to make ‘difficult’ decisions about who to include among the guests as a result of Covid restrictions.

But she did her best to honour her late husband’s wishes and include representatives of all sides of the family – and from every generation, apart from his great-grandchildren who are considered too young to attend.

‘The family have had to implement his wishes in the best way they can,’ he said. 

Sophie and Lady Louise read the messages together as they walked looked at the floral tributes for around 15 minutes

Sophie and Lady Louise read the messages together as they walked looked at the floral tributes for around 15 minutes

Sophie and Lady Louise read the messages together as they walked looked at the floral tributes for around 15 minutes

The Earl of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers outside St George's Chapel, at Windsor Castle

The Earl of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers outside St George's Chapel, at Windsor Castle

The Earl of Wessex, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers outside St George’s Chapel, at Windsor Castle

Sophie, while looking over handwritten letters from children, could be heard saying 'how sweet', before speaking to her husband about the amount of flowers

Sophie, while looking over handwritten letters from children, could be heard saying 'how sweet', before speaking to her husband about the amount of flowers

Sophie, while looking over handwritten letters from children, could be heard saying ‘how sweet’, before speaking to her husband about the amount of flowers

A wreath sent by Prime Minister Boris Johnson  (pictured) was laid next to flowers from the Scottish Government, lewd by his political rival Nicola Sturgeon

A wreath sent by Prime Minister Boris Johnson  (pictured) was laid next to flowers from the Scottish Government, lewd by his political rival Nicola Sturgeon

A wreath sent by Prime Minister Boris Johnson was laid next to flowers from the Scottish Government (pictured), laid by his political rival Nicola Sturgeon

A wreath sent by Prime Minister Boris Johnson was laid next to flowers from the Scottish Government (pictured), laid by his political rival Nicola Sturgeon

A wreath sent by Prime Minister Boris Johnson (left) was laid next to flowers from the Scottish Government (right) , laid by his political rival Nicola Sturgeon

A wreath from Boris Johnson has paid tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh, saying the nation owes him 'more than words can say'

A wreath from Boris Johnson has paid tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh, saying the nation owes him 'more than words can say'

A wreath from Boris Johnson has paid tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh, saying the nation owes him ‘more than words can say’

A wreath sent by the Government of New Zealand

A wreath sent by the Government of New Zealand

A wreath sent by the people of Canada

A wreath sent by the people of Canada

Wreathes sent by the Government of New Zealand and the Government of Canada have also been laid

Britain's Prince Edward and Sophie, Countess of Wessex arrive at Windsor Castle to support the Queen

Britain's Prince Edward and Sophie, Countess of Wessex arrive at Windsor Castle to support the Queen

Britain’s Prince Edward and Sophie, Countess of Wessex arrive at Windsor Castle to support the Queen

Lady Louise Windsor, daughter of the Earl and Countess of Wessex, walks down the High Street in Windsor this afternoon

Lady Louise Windsor, daughter of the Earl and Countess of Wessex, walks down the High Street in Windsor this afternoon

Lady Louise Windsor, daughter of the Earl and Countess of Wessex, walks down the High Street in Windsor this afternoon

Mounted police officers ride along the Long Walk near Windsor Castle today, one day before Prince Philip's funeral

Mounted police officers ride along the Long Walk near Windsor Castle today, one day before Prince Philip's funeral

Mounted police officers ride along the Long Walk near Windsor Castle today, one day before Prince Philip’s funeral

A Union Jack flag flies at half-mast at Buckingham Palace today, the day before the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

A Union Jack flag flies at half-mast at Buckingham Palace today, the day before the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

A Union Jack flag flies at half-mast at Buckingham Palace today, the day before the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh

People stand next to flowers and messages left outside Buckingham Palace today, the day before the funeral of Prince Philip

People stand next to flowers and messages left outside Buckingham Palace today, the day before the funeral of Prince Philip

People stand next to flowers and messages left outside Buckingham Palace today, the day before the funeral of Prince Philip

A woman leaves flowers outside Buckingham Palace in London today following the death of the Duke of Edinburgh

A woman leaves flowers outside Buckingham Palace in London today following the death of the Duke of Edinburgh

A woman leaves flowers outside Buckingham Palace in London today following the death of the Duke of Edinburgh

Police officers stand outside Buckingham Palace as people stand near the gates today, one day before Prince Philip's funeral

Police officers stand outside Buckingham Palace as people stand near the gates today, one day before Prince Philip's funeral

Police officers stand outside Buckingham Palace as people stand near the gates today, one day before Prince Philip’s funeral

Flowers and a message are seen outside Buckingham Palace in London today ahead of the Duke's funeral tomorrow

Flowers and a message are seen outside Buckingham Palace in London today ahead of the Duke's funeral tomorrow

Flowers and a message are seen outside Buckingham Palace in London today ahead of the Duke’s funeral tomorrow

People stand next to flowers and messages left outside Buckingham Palace today, ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral

People stand next to flowers and messages left outside Buckingham Palace today, ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral

People stand next to flowers and messages left outside Buckingham Palace today, ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral

William and Harry, 36, were last seen in public together at a Commonwealth Day service in March last year where they could barely look each other in the eye following Harry and Meghan's acrimonious split from the Royal Family

William and Harry, 36, were last seen in public together at a Commonwealth Day service in March last year where they could barely look each other in the eye following Harry and Meghan's acrimonious split from the Royal Family

William and Harry, 36, were last seen in public together at a Commonwealth Day service in March last year where they could barely look each other in the eye following Harry and Meghan’s acrimonious split from the Royal Family

Peter Phillips, the eldest grandson of Prince Philip, is being viewed as a mediator between the two brothers (pictured next to Harry at the Queen Mother's funeral)

Peter Phillips, the eldest grandson of Prince Philip, is being viewed as a mediator between the two brothers (pictured next to Harry at the Queen Mother's funeral)

Peter Phillips, the eldest grandson of Prince Philip, is being viewed as a mediator between the two brothers (pictured next to Harry at the Queen Mother’s funeral)

Armed Forces personnel continue to file into the castle this morning. 700 of them will take part in the funeral tomorrow

Armed Forces personnel continue to file into the castle this morning. 700 of them will take part in the funeral tomorrow

Armed Forces personnel continue to file into the castle this morning. 700 of them will take part in the funeral tomorrow

Soldier carrying a bugle draped with the Royal Standard arrives at Windsor Castle for final preparations for Prince Philip’s funeral

Andre and Stan Walker carry a wreath to lay at the gates of Windsor Castle, where inside Her Majesty is overseeing final preparations

Andre and Stan Walker carry a wreath to lay at the gates of Windsor Castle, where inside Her Majesty is overseeing final preparations

Andre and Stan Walker carry a wreath to lay at the gates of Windsor Castle, where inside Her Majesty is overseeing final preparations

Following his funeral, the Duke of Edinburgh will be privately interred in the Royal Vault - but this will not be his final resting place. When the Queen dies, Philip will be transferred to the church's King George VI memorial chapel (pictured) to lie alongside his devoted wife of 73 years

Following his funeral, the Duke of Edinburgh will be privately interred in the Royal Vault - but this will not be his final resting place. When the Queen dies, Philip will be transferred to the church's King George VI memorial chapel (pictured) to lie alongside his devoted wife of 73 years

Following his funeral, the Duke of Edinburgh will be privately interred in the Royal Vault – but this will not be his final resting place. When the Queen dies, Philip will be transferred to the church’s King George VI memorial chapel (pictured) to lie alongside his devoted wife of 73 years

Harry and William will not stand together at Prince Philip's funeral on Saturday, unlike them doing so at their mother Princess Diana's funeral (pictured)

Harry and William will not stand together at Prince Philip's funeral on Saturday, unlike them doing so at their mother Princess Diana's funeral (pictured)

Harry and William will not stand together at Prince Philip’s funeral on Saturday, unlike them doing so at their mother Princess Diana’s funeral (pictured)

The Land Rover Defender hearse that will carry Philip's coffin is seen for the first time as it is driven into Windsor Castle today

The Land Rover Defender hearse that will carry Philip's coffin is seen for the first time as it is driven into Windsor Castle today

The Land Rover Defender hearse that will carry Philip’s coffin is seen for the first time as it is driven into Windsor Castle today

Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh are pictured last year in the quadrangle of Windsor Castle ahead of his 99th birthday

Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh are pictured last year in the quadrangle of Windsor Castle ahead of his 99th birthday

Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh are pictured last year in the quadrangle of Windsor Castle ahead of his 99th birthday

Philip's medals include the following. Queen's Service Order, New Zealand On November 15, 1981, Prince Philip was awarded the Queen's Service Order by the Government of New Zealand for service to the country. The flower-shaped medal is the first worn on Prince Philip's chest. The order was established on March 13, 1975, and is used to recognise 'valuable voluntary service to the community or meritorious and faithful services to the Crown or similar services within the public sector, whether in elected or appointed office'. The order replaced the Imperial Service Order in New Zealand following a 1974 review of New Zealand's honour system. 1939-1945 Star This star is a campaign medal of the British Commonwealth awarded for service during the Second World War. It was put in place on July 8, 1943, and was awarded for specific periods of military service between September 3, 1939, and either May 8, 1945, in Europe or September 2, 1945, in the far east. Those in the Navy had to spent 180 at sea to be awarded the medal. Atlantic Star In May 1945, Prince Philip was awarded the military campaign medal the Atlantic star. It was for service during the Battle of the Atlantic - World War II's longest campaign. Africa Star Prince Philip was awarded the Africa Star on July 8, 1943, for service in Africa during the Second World War. The medal was awarded to those who served in North Africa between June 10, 1940, and May 12, 1943. Burma Star (with Pacific Rosette) In May 1945, he was awarded the Burma Star for service in the Burma Campaign in the Second World War. The Burma Star awards British and Commonwealth forces who served in the Burma Campaign from 1941 to 1945. He also wore the Pacific clasp on the Star for his service in the Pacific. Philip was the First Lieutenant of the destroyer HMS Whelp and was present in Tokyo Bay when the Japanese signed the surrender agreement with Allied forces

Philip's medals include the following. Queen's Service Order, New Zealand On November 15, 1981, Prince Philip was awarded the Queen's Service Order by the Government of New Zealand for service to the country. The flower-shaped medal is the first worn on Prince Philip's chest. The order was established on March 13, 1975, and is used to recognise 'valuable voluntary service to the community or meritorious and faithful services to the Crown or similar services within the public sector, whether in elected or appointed office'. The order replaced the Imperial Service Order in New Zealand following a 1974 review of New Zealand's honour system. 1939-1945 Star This star is a campaign medal of the British Commonwealth awarded for service during the Second World War. It was put in place on July 8, 1943, and was awarded for specific periods of military service between September 3, 1939, and either May 8, 1945, in Europe or September 2, 1945, in the far east. Those in the Navy had to spent 180 at sea to be awarded the medal. Atlantic Star In May 1945, Prince Philip was awarded the military campaign medal the Atlantic star. It was for service during the Battle of the Atlantic - World War II's longest campaign. Africa Star Prince Philip was awarded the Africa Star on July 8, 1943, for service in Africa during the Second World War. The medal was awarded to those who served in North Africa between June 10, 1940, and May 12, 1943. Burma Star (with Pacific Rosette) In May 1945, he was awarded the Burma Star for service in the Burma Campaign in the Second World War. The Burma Star awards British and Commonwealth forces who served in the Burma Campaign from 1941 to 1945. He also wore the Pacific clasp on the Star for his service in the Pacific. Philip was the First Lieutenant of the destroyer HMS Whelp and was present in Tokyo Bay when the Japanese signed the surrender agreement with Allied forces

 Philip’s medals include the following. Queen’s Service Order, New Zealand On November 15, 1981, Prince Philip was awarded the Queen’s Service Order by the Government of New Zealand for service to the country. The flower-shaped medal is the first worn on Prince Philip’s chest. The order was established on March 13, 1975, and is used to recognise ‘valuable voluntary service to the community or meritorious and faithful services to the Crown or similar services within the public sector, whether in elected or appointed office’. The order replaced the Imperial Service Order in New Zealand following a 1974 review of New Zealand’s honour system. 1939-1945 Star This star is a campaign medal of the British Commonwealth awarded for service during the Second World War. It was put in place on July 8, 1943, and was awarded for specific periods of military service between September 3, 1939, and either May 8, 1945, in Europe or September 2, 1945, in the far east. Those in the Navy had to spent 180 at sea to be awarded the medal. Atlantic Star In May 1945, Prince Philip was awarded the military campaign medal the Atlantic star. It was for service during the Battle of the Atlantic – World War II’s longest campaign. Africa Star Prince Philip was awarded the Africa Star on July 8, 1943, for service in Africa during the Second World War. The medal was awarded to those who served in North Africa between June 10, 1940, and May 12, 1943. Burma Star (with Pacific Rosette) In May 1945, he was awarded the Burma Star for service in the Burma Campaign in the Second World War. The Burma Star awards British and Commonwealth forces who served in the Burma Campaign from 1941 to 1945. He also wore the Pacific clasp on the Star for his service in the Pacific. Philip was the First Lieutenant of the destroyer HMS Whelp and was present in Tokyo Bay when the Japanese signed the surrender agreement with Allied forces

Troops leave Windsor Castle yesterday after a rehearsal for the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral which takes place on Saturday

Troops leave Windsor Castle yesterday after a rehearsal for the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral which takes place on Saturday

Troops leave Windsor Castle yesterday after a rehearsal for the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral which takes place on Saturday

Pictured today, the Jaguar Land Rover that will be used to transport the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh at his funeral

Pictured today, the Jaguar Land Rover that will be used to transport the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh at his funeral

Pictured today, the Jaguar Land Rover that will be used to transport the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh at his funeral

The minute-by-minute arrangements for Prince Philip's funeral on Saturday have been revealed today and are shown above, starting at 11am and finishing just after 3pm

The minute-by-minute arrangements for Prince Philip's funeral on Saturday have been revealed today and are shown above, starting at 11am and finishing just after 3pm

The minute-by-minute arrangements for Prince Philip’s funeral on Saturday have been revealed today and are shown above, starting at 11am and finishing just after 3pm

Rehearsals have been taking place at Windsor Castle today ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral this Saturday

Rehearsals have been taking place at Windsor Castle today ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral this Saturday

Rehearsals have been taking place at Windsor Castle today ahead of the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral this Saturday

Wardens stand outside Windsor Castle today following the death of the Duke of Edinburgh at the age of 99 last Friday

Wardens stand outside Windsor Castle today following the death of the Duke of Edinburgh at the age of 99 last Friday

Wardens stand outside Windsor Castle today following the death of the Duke of Edinburgh at the age of 99 last Friday

Sailors during rehearsals for the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh at HMS Collingwood in Fareham, in a photo released today

Sailors during rehearsals for the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh at HMS Collingwood in Fareham, in a photo released today

Sailors during rehearsals for the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh at HMS Collingwood in Fareham, in a photo released today

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery move up the Long Walk at Windsor Castle today during a rehearsal for the funeral

The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery move up the Long Walk at Windsor Castle today during a rehearsal for the funeral

The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery move up the Long Walk at Windsor Castle today during a rehearsal for the funeral

Diane Hatcher, a seamstress at Cleave Court Jewellers, sews medals and decorations conferred on Philip onto cushions today

Diane Hatcher, a seamstress at Cleave Court Jewellers, sews medals and decorations conferred on Philip onto cushions today

Diane Hatcher, a seamstress at Cleave Court Jewellers, sews medals and decorations conferred on Philip onto cushions today

The Queen and Prince Philip with their great-grandchildren, from left, George, Louis, Charlotte, Savannah Phillips, Isla Phillips, Lena Tindall and Mia Tindall. This picture taken by Kate Middleton in 2018 was released by the Royal Family yesterday

The Queen and Prince Philip with their great-grandchildren, from left, George, Louis, Charlotte, Savannah Phillips, Isla Phillips, Lena Tindall and Mia Tindall. This picture taken by Kate Middleton in 2018 was released by the Royal Family yesterday

The Queen and Prince Philip with their great-grandchildren, from left, George, Louis, Charlotte, Savannah Phillips, Isla Phillips, Lena Tindall and Mia Tindall. This picture taken by Kate Middleton in 2018 was released by the Royal Family yesterday

The Duke of Cambridge and Duke of Sussex, whose troubled relationship has been well documented, will be separated by cousin Peter Phillips as they walk in a line behind their grandfather's coffin. They are pictured with Philip at Sandhurst in 2006

The Duke of Cambridge and Duke of Sussex, whose troubled relationship has been well documented, will be separated by cousin Peter Phillips as they walk in a line behind their grandfather's coffin. They are pictured with Philip at Sandhurst in 2006

The Duke of Cambridge and Duke of Sussex, whose troubled relationship has been well documented, will be separated by cousin Peter Phillips as they walk in a line behind their grandfather’s coffin. They are pictured with Philip at Sandhurst in 2006

He stressed that the decision for the two princes to move apart from Mr Phillips and go into the chapel separately was a ‘practical’ one, as they could not have walked three abreast through the door while social distancing.

Prince Philip had been involved in the planning for his funeral for at least two decades, but his wife had been forced to change it to a pared back event due to Covid.

More than 700 military personnel will be involved in ceremony, with his beloved Royal Marines carrying his coffin, which will bear his sword and cap.

Tomorrow service detachments recognising Philip’s special military relationships will be in position in the Windsor Castle Quadrangle, as he begins his final journey.

These include the: Royal Navy; Royal Marines; Band of the Royal Marines; Royal Fleet Auxiliary; The Queen’s Royal Hussars (The Queen’s Own and Royal Irish); Grenadier, Coldstream and Welsh Guards; The Highlanders, 4th Battalion; The Royal Regiment of Scotland; Royal Gurkha Rifles; The Rifles; REME; Intelligence Corps; Royal Air Force; Guidon, Colour and Truncheon Parties and several military bands.

The Quadrangle will also be lined by the Household Cavalry, The Foot Guards and the Band of the Grenadier Guards.

Before the funeral procession sets off, the Queen will have a moment of quiet reflection when her car draws up behind the coffin at the State Entrance to the castle and pauses for a moment.

The procession will then depart, following the Land Rover as it is driven to the west steps of St George’s Chapel. But the Queen will not be required to follow it all the way down.

Instead her car will stop at the Galilee porch at the chapel, where she will be greeted by the Dean of Windsor before taking her seat inside.

On the altar will be displayed some of the duke’s regalia personally chosen by Philip himself, which will include nods to his Danish and Greek heritage.

Buckingham Palace has refused to say what the royal family will do after the service. In normal circumstances there would be a wake, but coronavirus rules allow only outdoor gatherings of up to six people. The televised ceremonial aspects of the funeral will start at 2pm.

A Palace spokesman stressed the funeral will be a ‘family event’ said the Royal Family was ‘grateful’ and ‘touched’ for all the messages of condolence from around the world and at the way so many people had shared ‘fond memories’ of the duke.

Among the other guests are the Duchess of Cornwall, all of the duke’s grandchildren and their spouses, the children of the Queen’s sister Princess Margaret and three of Philip’s German relatives – Bernhard, the Hereditary Prince of Baden; Donatus, Prince and Landgrave of Hesse; and Prince Philipp of Hohenlohe-Langenburg.

700 military personnel will be involved in Saturday’s funeral that was ‘decades in the planning’ before the Queen was forced to pare it back due to Covid

More than 700 military personnel will be involved in ceremony, with his beloved Royal Marines carrying his coffin, which will bear his sword and cap.

Tomorrow service detachments recognising Philip’s special military relationships will be in position in the Windsor Castle Quadrangle, as he begins his final journey.

These include the: Royal Navy; Royal Marines; Band of the Royal Marines; Royal Fleet Auxiliary; The Queen’s Royal Hussars (The Queen’s Own and Royal Irish); Grenadier, Coldstream and Welsh Guards; The Highlanders, 4th Battalion; The Royal Regiment of Scotland; Royal Gurkha Rifles; The Rifles; REME; Intelligence Corps; Royal Air Force; Guidon, Colour and Truncheon Parties and several military bands.

The Quadrangle will also be lined by the Household Cavalry, The Foot Guards and the Band of the Grenadier Guards.

Before the funeral procession sets off, the Queen will have a moment of quiet reflection when her car draws up behind the coffin at the State Entrance to the castle and pauses for a moment.

The procession will then depart, following the Land Rover as it is driven to the west steps of St George’s Chapel. But the Queen will not be required to follow it all the way down.

Instead her car will stop at the Galilee porch at the chapel, where she will be greeted by the Dean of Windsor before taking her seat inside.

On the altar will be displayed some of the duke’s regalia personally chosen by Philip himself, which will include nods to his Danish and Greek heritage.

Yesterday the Ministry of Defence shared pictures of The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery, Navy crew from HMS Heron and other commandos practising their roles.

Meanwhile other military personnel rehearsed for the event at Army Training Centre Pirbright, near London, as the sun came out.

One of the four Royal Marine buglers who will play ‘The Last Post’ at the service said it was an ‘honor and privilege’ to perform the role.

Sgt Bugler Jamie Ritchie said: ‘It’s incredibly important. We feel nervous. We feel the pressure, but we’re channeling that and we’re using that and we’re going to deliver an outstanding performance.’ 

<!—->

Advertisement

Also invited is a close friend of the duke, Countess Mountbatten of Burma, previously known as Lady Romsey and later Lady Brabourne, who was Philip’s carriage driving partner and one of his closest friends.

While the Queen will be joined by her lady-in-waiting on her way to the service, she will sit by herself in the quire of the chapel, with all mourners following Covid-19 guidelines and remaining socially distanced. The lady-in-waiting will not sit in the quire and is not counted among the guest list of 30.

Leading the procession to the chapel will be the Band of the Grenadier Guards, followed by the Major General commanding the Household Division, service chiefs, the Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin borne on a custom-built Land Rover hearse, members of the royal family on foot, Philip’s household staff, and finally the Bentley carrying the Queen.

The Palace has not said which lady-in-waiting will accompany Her Majesty in the vehicle.

The Queen’s ladies-in-waiting, personally chosen by the monarch, have a variety of duties including attending to private and personal matters for the Queen and handling her correspondence.

They include her senior lady-in-waiting, Lady Susan Hussey, who was married to the late BBC chairman Marmaduke Hussey.

The Queen’s ladies-in-waiting have also been part of HMS Bubble – the name given to the reduced selection of around 20 staff attending to the Queen at Windsor during lockdown.

Some of the ladies-in-waiting have been with the Queen for more than 50 years and act as both friends and loyal assistants, and their discretion and support will be invaluable.

Details of Philip’s funeral were released by Buckingham Palace Thursday night and it has been confirmed the Queen – like all 30 guests invited to the service – will wear a facemask in the car and in the chapel.

The Queen will depart the Sovereign’s Entrance in the state Bentley accompanied by a lady-in-waiting at 2.44pm.

Prince Harry has spoken in the past about how he and William are on ‘different paths’ and have good and bad days in their relationship.

Their brotherly bond was put under further strain after the Sussexes’ interview with Oprah Winfrey where they accused a royal family member of racism, something William strongly denied.

Asked whether arrangements for the procession reflected the royal siblings’ relationship, a Buckingham Palace spokesman said: ‘This is a funeral, we’re not going to be drawn into those perceptions of drama, or anything like that, this is a funeral.

‘The arrangements have been agreed, and they represent Her Majesty’s wishes, so we’re not going to say anything more on that.’

The Buckingham Palace spokesman stressed the duke’s funeral will ‘at its heart’ be a ‘family event’.

He said: ‘We are following the Covid guidelines, there (is) a limit on who could be invited as a guest and Her Majesty wanted to ensure that all branches of the duke’s family were there, and had to make – I think fair to say – difficult decisions about who would be there.’

BBC broadcaster Huw Edwards will lead nearly six hours of coverage broadcast from Windsor across three programmes on Friday and Saturday, while ITV News’ funeral coverage on Saturday will be led by Tom Brady and Julie Etchingham. 

The Earl and Countess of Wessex (pictured last November) will both be attending the funeral at Windsor Castle on Saturday

The Earl and Countess of Wessex (pictured last November) will both be attending the funeral at Windsor Castle on Saturday

The Earl and Countess of Wessex (pictured last November) will both be attending the funeral at Windsor Castle on Saturday

James Viscount Severn, the son of the Earl and Countess of Wessex

James Viscount Severn, the son of the Earl and Countess of Wessex

Lady Louise Windsor, the daughter of the Earl and Countess of Wessex

Lady Louise Windsor, the daughter of the Earl and Countess of Wessex

James Viscount Severn (left) and Lady Louise Windsor (right), the Earl and Countess of Wessex’s children, will both be going

Princess Eugenie and her husband Jack Brooksbank

Princess Eugenie and her husband Jack Brooksbank

Princess Beatrice and her husband Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi

Princess Beatrice and her husband Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi

Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank (left) and Princess Beatrice and Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi (right) will all be at the funeral

Peter Phillips

Peter Phillips

Zara Tindall and Mike Tindall

Zara Tindall and Mike Tindall

Peter Phillips (left) and Zara Tindall and Mike Tindall (right) will all be attending the service at Windsor Castle this weekend

Daniel Chatto

Daniel Chatto

Lady Sarah Chatto

Lady Sarah Chatto

Daniel Chatto (left) and Lady Sarah Chatto (right) will be among the 30 guests invited to the funeral at Windsor Castle

Princess Alexandra is one of the 30 members of the Royal Family who will be in attendance at the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral

Princess Alexandra is one of the 30 members of the Royal Family who will be in attendance at the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral

Princess Alexandra is one of the 30 members of the Royal Family who will be in attendance at the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral

Vice Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence

Vice Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence

Earl of Snowdon

Earl of Snowdon

Vice Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence (left) and the Earl of Snowdon (right) will both be attending the service this Saturday

Duke of Kent

Duke of Kent

Duke of Gloucester

Duke of Gloucester

The Duke of Kent (left) and Duke of Gloucester (right) will both be at the funeral which takes place from 3pm on Saturday

During the funeral service, which will be conducted by the Dean of Windsor David Conner, the duke’s coffin will be lowered into the royal vault in front of the guests.

What are the key timings for Prince Philip’s funeral?

The ceremonial arrangements for Prince Philip’s funeral on Saturday will reflect military affiliations and personal elements of his life. The congregation will wear masks for the service and members of the royal family will be wearing morning coat with medals or day dress. Philip has been lying at rest in the private chapel in Windsor Castle. Here is a timeline of events:

  • 11am: The coffin, which will be covered with Philip’s personal standard along with his sword, naval cap and a wreath of flowers, will be moved from the private chapel to the Inner Hall of Windsor Castle by members of The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.
  • 2pm: The Lord Chamberlain, the Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle and the Dean of Windsor will be present in the Inner Hall.
  • 2.10pm: The Dean will say prayers before leaving by car to St George’s Chapel.
  • 2.15pm: Representatives from the services are in place in the Quadrangle to show Philip’s special military relationships. The Quadrangle will also be lined by the Household Cavalry and The Foot Guards.
  • 2.17pm. The band of the Grenadier Guards will be in Engine Court.
  • Between 2.20pm and 2.27pm. Members of the royal family and Philip’s relatives who are not taking part in the procession will leave Windsor Castle by car to make the journey to the chapel.
  • 2.27pm. The Land Rover, upon which the coffin will be placed, enters the Quadrangle via George IV Gate where bands at the site begin to play music. The service chiefs, the Major General commanding the Household Division and his staff leave from the Equerries Entrance and take their position by the State Entrance. They will face the Land Rover. The pall bearers take up position either side of the Land Rover and together they move towards the State Entrance.
  • 2.38pm: The coffin is lifted in the Inner Hall.
  • 2.40pm: Members of Philip’s household take up their positions in the procession and the bands stop playing music.
  • 2.41pm: The coffin emerges from the State Entrance and is met by members of the royal family who are walking in the procession. They will not be wearing uniforms. A royal salute is given by the service detachments, the service chiefs, the pall bearers, the Major General commanding the Household Division and his staff give a royal salute. The coffin is placed on to the Land Rover.
  • 2.44pm: The Queen, accompanied by a lady-in-waiting, leaves from the Sovereign’s Entrance in the State Bentley as the national anthem is played. The Bentley will pause as it reaches the rear of the procession so the front section of the procession can turn to face the direction of travel.
  • 2.45pm: The procession, which is planned to take eight minutes, sets off. The firing of minute guns by The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery from the East Lawn and the sound of the Curfew Tower Bell will form the backdrop as members of the royal family who are already at St George’s Chapel stand to view the procession. The Queen will be received by the Dean of Windsor who will show the mourners at the service, including those who have been watching the procession, to their seats. A royal salute is given by the Windsor Castle Guard as the coffin passes the Parade Ground. The Band of the Grenadier Guards will stop playing and march through into Denton’s Commons as the procession approaches. The Rifles Guard of Honour, positioned in Horseshoe Cloister, will give a royal salute and the national anthem will be played. The service chiefs, the Major General commanding the Household Division and his staff will halt on the north side of the West Steps and turn to face the coffin.
  • 2.53pm: The Land Rover arrives at the foot of the West Steps of the chapel. A Royal Navy piping party will sound once the Land Rover stops and the pall bearers take their positions. The coffin will be carried up the steps and halt on the second landing as members of the royal family take their positions on the steps.
  • 3pm: The National Minute’s Silence, signalled by a gun fired by The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery, takes place. After the minute’s silence, the Dean of Windsor and the Archbishop of Canterbury receive the coffin which has been followed by the members of the royal family who have walked in the procession. As the doors to St George’s Chapel close to the sound of Carry On being played, the Land Rover, service chiefs, realm defence advisers, bodyguards, military knights of Windsor, along with representatives of services, will leave in silence during the funeral service. After the National Minute’s Silence, the coffin is placed on the Catafalque in the Quire and members of the royal family who have walked in the procession will take their places for the service which is set to last 50 minutes and will be conducted by the Dean of Windsor. The Dean will give the commendation as the coffin is lowered into the Royal Vault. A lament will then be played by a Pipe Major of the Royal Regiment of Scotland. The piper will walk from the North Quire Aisle to The Dean’s Cloister. The Last Post will be sounded by buglers of the Royal Marines from the west end of the Nave. After a period of silence, the Reveille will be sounded by the State Trumpeters of the Household Cavalry from the west end of the Nave. The buglers of the Royal Marines will sound Action Stations and this is at the specific request of The Duke of Edinburgh. The Archbishop of Canterbury will pronounce the Blessing, after which the national anthem will be sung by the four singers present.
  • After the service: The Queen and members of the royal family and Philip’s relatives will leave the chapel via the Galilee Porch.
<!—->

Advertisement

A senior palace official said: ‘The dean will give the commendation as the coffin is lowered into the royal vault, Garter Principal King of Arms will then proclaim His Royal Highness’ styles and titles from the sanctuary.’

The Duke’s project to custom build his own Land Rover hearse spanned 16 years, with Philip requesting a repaint in military green and designing the open top rear and special ‘stops’ to secure his coffin in place.

Philip’s modified Land Rover Defender TD5 130 chassis cab vehicle has been unveiled for the first time, two days before his final farewell in St George’s Chapel.

The duke, who died aged 99 on Friday, made the final adjustments in 2019, the year he turned 98.

He first began the long-lasting venture to create his own bespoke hearse in collaboration with Land Rover in 2003, the year he turned 82.

The polished sturdy, utilitarian vehicle, with its heavy duty wheels and angular structure, stands as a showcase for the duke’s practical nature, and his passion for functional design and engineering.

The Defender was made at Land Rover’s factory in Solihull in 2003 and Philip oversaw the modifications throughout the intervening years.

The duke, who served with distinction in the Second World War and held special associations with all the Armed Forces, requested the original Belize Green bodywork be switched to Dark Bronze Green, a colour used for many military Land Rovers.

He also designed the open top rear section where his coffin will rest, made to his exact specifications, including the rubber grips on silver metal pins known as the ‘stops’ or ‘stoppers’ which perform the crucial task of preventing the coffin from moving.

Details on the vehicle include matching green hubs, a black front grille, a single cab and no registration plates.

Eighteen years after the duke began the Land Rover project, the vehicle will finally be used for its intended function on Saturday.

The vehicle will ferry Philip’s coffin in a slow procession from the state entrance of Windsor Castle through the grounds to the west steps of St George’s Chapel, followed by the Prince of Wales and other members of the royal family on foot.

Land Rover has maintained the vehicle since it was built and has prepared it for the funeral in collaboration with the Royal Household.

Jaguar Land Rover’s chief executive Thierry Bollore hailed Philip’s ‘impressive knowledge and deep interest in vehicle design, engineering and manufacturing’.

He said: ‘We are deeply privileged to have enjoyed a very long and happy association with the Duke of Edinburgh over many decades.

‘We are also honoured that the Land Rover which the duke designed will be used at the funeral on Saturday. The duke was a tremendous champion for design, engineering and technology.

‘During his visits to our sites he engaged with hundreds of employees and demonstrated his impressive knowledge and deep interest in vehicle design, engineering and manufacturing.

‘The duke was a truly remarkable man and will be greatly missed.’

Prince Philip used Land Rovers throughout his adult life and granted his Royal Warrant to Land Rover over 40 years ago.

He visited Jaguar Land Rover’s manufacturing facilities on numerous occasions over the decades and accompanied the Queen when she opened Jaguar Land Rover’s new Engine Manufacturing Centre in Wolverhampton in 2014.

The Land Rover’s original role would also have been to transport the duke 22 miles from Wellington Arch in central London to Windsor, but the coronavirus pandemic curtailed the long-held plans for military parades in honour of Philip through the streets of both the capital and the Berkshire town.

It will be flanked by pall bearers reflecting the duke’s special relationships with the military, the Royal Marines, Regiments, Corps and Air Stations.

Palace officials have told how the duke’s interest in design sparked his desire to make the Land Rover and include it in his funeral plans, codenamed Operation Forth Bridge.

Two Land Rovers were made for ‘belt and braces’ in case a backup was needed.

In 2019, the duke, then 97, was driving a Land Rover Freelander when he was involved in a serious car crash involving a mother and a baby.

The car Philip was driving was hit by another vehicle when he pulled out of a driveway on the Sandringham estate in Norfolk on to a busy A road, after being dazzled by the low sun.

The duke’s car flipped over and he was trapped, and had to be rescued through the sunroof by a passing motorist. He was miraculously unscathed.

The baby was unhurt, but both women in the other vehicle had to be treated in hospital, and one broke her wrist.

Three weeks after the crash, Buckingham Palace said Philip’s driving days on public roads were finally over and he had voluntarily surrendered his driving licence. The CPS later confirmed Philip would face no action over the crash.

Also today it was revealed how the Duke of Edinburgh personally selected the regalia that will be on the altar for his funeral.

Philip’s chosen insignia, the medals and decorations conferred on him by the UK and Commonwealth countries – together with his Royal Air Force wings and Field Marshal’s baton, will be pre-positioned on nine cushions on the altar in St George’s Chapel.

Link hienalouca.com

Advertising:

Tips to Find Low Priced Luxury Holiday Package Deals Fast

For most families, it has already been a common practice to spend the Holiday season in a foreign location. This is caused by the aviation market changes which have given a lot of benefits for people who travel a lot. Airfares going to different tourist destinations are becoming more inexpensive. What does this mean? If there is a perfect time to purchase luxury holiday package deals, now it the right time! Based on the market trend nowadays, you can save both money and time when you go for a luxury holiday. There are countless offers that combine travel and accommodation in one package which is a lot cheaper than getting separate deals. Aside from that, it is also risky to individually book the services that you need for the vacation. You might end up missing out on some important details of the trip. Unlike when you take advantage of luxury holiday package deals, you can be sure that everything is organized meticulously and according to what you really need. Nonetheless, you would still need to carefully select the package that would fit your needs. Review the following tips in getting packages that are reasonably priced. · Normally, luxury tour packages include accommodation, flight travel and transportation to individual tourist destinations. It would be best to choose the complete package so you won’t have to worry about other vacation elements. In addition to that, these are the packages that have the biggest discounts. · You can get big mark down prices, if you will purchase more packages. It is not a bad idea to share the wonderful moment with your loved ones. By doing so, you would not only enjoy, you will also save more money. You can even use your savings for other activities on your vacation. · It would be best to know how much you are willing to pay for the luxury tour packages. You can already work around your budget. You have to stick to your budget. If not, you might end up spending a lot and you will be left with less money for your vacation. · Prices may vary depending on the destination of the tour. You can do a research about places that are attractive yet inexpensive. There are thousands of destinations and you just have to choose wisely. · There are packages that include recreational activities. This means that you are paying for all the activities when you purchase these packages. The right thing to do is to make sure that the activities that are included would be the ones that you really enjoy. There is no sense in paying for activities that will not really make your vacation memorable. If you are going with friends, you should also consider their preferences so that you can be sure that everyone will enjoy the trip. There are other ways on how you can be sure that you are getting the best deal for your luxury holiday vacation. No matter how you choose to do it, you have to get adequate information about the packages. This will help you determine whether it is worth the price.

(Total views: 60 Time, 1 visits per day)

Leave a Reply