Texas salon owner says he’s used Gorilla Glue on hair for YEARS

A Texas salon owner has confessed that he has been using Gorilla Glue in clients’ hair for years.

After Louisiana mother-of-five Tessica Brown went viral last week for her Gorilla-Glue-as-hairspray mishap — which left her with a permanent hairstyle for a month before a surgeon painstakingly removed the adhesive — stylist Eric Vaughn has admitted that he frequently squeezes the extra-strong glue on clients at his Houston salon, REV.

However, he never puts the glue directly onto people’s hair or scalp: Instead, he uses it to secure hair extensions.

Surprise! Texas salon owner Erica Vaugn has confessed that he has been using Gorilla Glue in clients' hair for years

Surprise! Texas salon owner Erica Vaugn has confessed that he has been using Gorilla Glue in clients' hair for years

Surprise! Texas salon owner Erica Vaugn has confessed that he has been using Gorilla Glue in clients’ hair for years

'So I've been using Gorilla Glue in people's hair for years, but this is the only way you should ever use it — at the end of sew-in,' he explained on TikTok, holding up a bottle

'So I've been using Gorilla Glue in people's hair for years, but this is the only way you should ever use it — at the end of sew-in,' he explained on TikTok, holding up a bottle

‘So I’ve been using Gorilla Glue in people’s hair for years, but this is the only way you should ever use it — at the end of sew-in,’ he explained on TikTok, holding up a bottle

In a TikTok video uploaded this week, Vaughn demonstrates how he uses Gorilla Glue on a client with blonde hair. 

‘So I’ve been using Gorilla Glue in people’s hair for years, but this is the only way you should ever use it — at the end of sew-in,’ he says, holding up a bottle.

‘I’ll take my threads and knot them together, take a tiny little dot of Gorilla Glue, and blow dry,’ he goes on, showing how he squeezes the glue onto the top of the fake hair to secure the end of the knot keeping it in place. 

‘That knot is going nowhere,’ he says. ‘But don’t put this on your actual hair, OK?’

The video has gone viral, earning over 330,000 likes — as well as some critiques from commenters insisting he shouldn’t be using the glue at all.

‘You really out here asking to get your license taken away?’ wrote one.

'I'll take my threads and knot them together, take a tiny little dot of Gorilla Glue, and blow dry,'

'I'll take my threads and knot them together, take a tiny little dot of Gorilla Glue, and blow dry,'

'That knot is going nowhere,' he says. 'But don't put this on your actual hair, OK?'

'That knot is going nowhere,' he says. 'But don't put this on your actual hair, OK?'

‘I’ll take my threads and knot them together, take a tiny little dot of Gorilla Glue, and blow dry. That knot is going nowhere,’ he says. ‘But don’t put this on your actual hair, OK?’

Divisive: The video has gone viral, earning over 330,000 likes — as well as some critiques from commenters insisting he shouldn't be using the glue at all and others defending him

Divisive: The video has gone viral, earning over 330,000 likes — as well as some critiques from commenters insisting he shouldn't be using the glue at all and others defending him

Divisive: The video has gone viral, earning over 330,000 likes — as well as some critiques from commenters insisting he shouldn’t be using the glue at all and others defending him

‘Oh hell no you don’t even need it for that,’ wrote another, while a third commented: ‘Didn’t we learn our lesson with the other girl?’

‘I say no more gorilla glue in the hair periodt,’ wrote one more.

Others, though, came to his defense, noting that he does not put the glue directly on clients’ hair or scalp. 

Vaughn’s video came in response to one that Brown, 40, shared last week, in which she explained that she ran out of Göt2b Glued Spray hairspray and substituted it with Gorilla Glue, a highly-adhesive glue that is not meant to be used on people.

‘Hey, y’all. For those of you that know me know that my hair has been like this for about a month now. It’s not by choice. No, it’s not by choice,’ she said at the start of the clip.

‘When I do my hair, I like to finish it off with a little Göt2b Glued Spray, you know, just to keep it in place. Well, I didn’t have any more Göt2b Glued Spray, so I used this: Gorilla Glue spray. Bad, bad, bad idea.’

She then patted her head to show how the glue spray had turned her hair into a stiff, immovable helmet.

Say what? Last week, Tessica Brown stunned social media users when she revealed she set her hair with Gorilla Glue spray and it left her with a permanent hair helmet

Say what? Last week, Tessica Brown stunned social media users when she revealed she set her hair with Gorilla Glue spray and it left her with a permanent hair helmet

Say what? Last week, Tessica Brown stunned social media users when she revealed she set her hair with Gorilla Glue spray and it left her with a permanent hair helmet

Yikes: Brown explained in her viral TikTok video that she ran out of her Göt2b Glued Spray and used Gorilla Glue instead

Yikes: Brown explained in her viral TikTok video that she ran out of her Göt2b Glued Spray and used Gorilla Glue instead

Yikes: Brown explained in her viral TikTok video that she ran out of her Göt2b Glued Spray and used Gorilla Glue instead

Yikes: Brown explained in her viral TikTok video that she ran out of her Göt2b Glued Spray and used Gorilla Glue instead

Yikes: Brown explained in her viral TikTok video that she ran out of her Göt2b Glued Spray and used Gorilla Glue instead 

‘Y’all look, it don’t move. You hear what I’m telling you? It. Don’t. Move. I’ve washed my hair 15 times and it don’t move,’ she insisted. ‘Stiff where? My hair.’

She ended her video with some words of advice: ‘If you ever, ever run out of Göt2b Glued Spray, don’t ever use this. Unless you want your hair to be like that forever.’

She went on to spend 22 hours in the ER, where baffled healthcare workers put acetone on her head, according to TMZ — but nothing seemed to work.    

As the video went viral, many viewers mocked Brown for the mistake, insisting she should have known better — and pointing to a warning on the bottle that says it’s an eye and skin irritant.

Gorilla Glue also released a statement on Twitter, writing: ‘We are aware of the situation and we are very sorry to hear about the unfortunate incident that Miss Brown experienced using our Spray Adhesive on her hair.

‘This is a unique situation because this product s not indicated for use in or on hair as it is considered permanent. Our spray adhesive states in the warning label “do not swallow. Do not get in eyes, on skin or on clothing.”‘

The company added: ‘We are glad to see in her recent video that Miss Brown has received medical treatment from her local medical facility and wish her the best.’ 

Struggle: She then reportedly spent 22 hours in the ER as healthcare workers tried to remove the Gorilla Glue spray

Struggle: She then reportedly spent 22 hours in the ER as healthcare workers tried to remove the Gorilla Glue spray

Struggle: She then reportedly spent 22 hours in the ER as healthcare workers tried to remove the Gorilla Glue spray

Throwback: She used to wear her hair in braids before switching up her look

Throwback: She used to wear her hair in braids before switching up her look

Throwback: She used to wear her hair in braids before switching up her look 

Response: Gorilla Glue released a statement about the situation on social media on Monday

Response: Gorilla Glue released a statement about the situation on social media on Monday

Response: Gorilla Glue released a statement about the situation on social media on Monday

Brown ultimately had to fly to Los Angeles to meet with plastic surgeon Dr. Michael Obeng, who spent four hours using a custom mix of medical-grade adhesive remover, aloe vera, olive oil, and acetone in order to dissolve the Gorilla Glue. 

In a video taken at Dr. Obeng’s office, Brown — who was given a light anesthesia before the treatment — is seen lying on an operating table after the successful procedure, running her hands through her freed locks and tearing up at the sensation.    

During the procedure, the custom mixture was applied to Brown’s hair using a spray bottle, while Dr. Obeng used medical tweezers and scissors to try and gently pull the matted hair apart, cutting the strands of glue that were holding her tresses together.

The doctor and his team then ran a comb through the hair to finally remove the glue, before applying a deep conditioning treatment to protect the locks.  

Brown was given painkillers and steroids to reduce the swelling and inflammation caused by the glue — and the chemicals that she used to try and remove it.  

Remarkably, Dr. Obeng was able to salvage much of her hair, and the mother-of-five revealed that she is now planning to get extensions to restore some length to her short locks.  

Link hienalouca.com

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