Fauci advises a return to schools for younger students

Dr Anthony Fauci said Sunday that the US should allow young students to return to school because they do not transmit the virus as readily as adults while doctors brace for another spike in COVID-19 after Super Bowl Sunday despite the numbers of new cases dropping to just a third of their peak last month.

Saturday reported 102,420 new cases, compared to 299,087 on January 2. Deaths have also been declining to 2,618 yesterday. This is just over half as many as the 5,077 reported just a few days earlier on February. 

The trend is promising but doctors fear that this weekend could spell the end of it, if people are not responsible at their Super Bowl parties. The biggest peaks in COVID-19 cases have followed the holidays including Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Meanwhile Dr Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert told Meet the Press that he believes students in the seventh grade and younger should be allowed to go back to in-person learning as they don’t pose a risk of raising the infection rate.

‘There have been a number of studies to show that when you have children that are of a certain age, namely above eighth grade and higher, that they transmit as easily as adults transmit,’ Fauci said.

‘Whereas younger children … they do not transmit as readily.’

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Dr Anthony Fauci (pictured) said Sunday that the US should allow young students to return to school

Dr Anthony Fauci (pictured) said Sunday that the US should allow young students to return to school

Dr Anthony Fauci (pictured) said Sunday that the US should allow young students to return to school

'There have been a number of studies to show that when you have children that are of a certain age, namely above eighth grade and higher, that they transmit as easily as adults transmit,' Fauci said. 'Whereas younger children … they do not transmit as readily'

'There have been a number of studies to show that when you have children that are of a certain age, namely above eighth grade and higher, that they transmit as easily as adults transmit,' Fauci said. 'Whereas younger children … they do not transmit as readily'

‘There have been a number of studies to show that when you have children that are of a certain age, namely above eighth grade and higher, that they transmit as easily as adults transmit,’ Fauci said. ‘Whereas younger children … they do not transmit as readily’

There have been more than 26.9 million infections since the start of the pandemic with at least 463,188 COVID-19 deaths

There have been more than 26.9 million infections since the start of the pandemic with at least 463,188 COVID-19 deaths

There have been more than 26.9 million infections since the start of the pandemic with at least 463,188 COVID-19 deaths 

Fauci also warned that the data does not support high school students going back to in-person learning. 

Meanwhile, doctors across the country are bracing for a surge in COVID-19 infections as Americans prepare for the Super Bowl and host large gatherings. 

Dr Sally Suliman said that she’s advising the public to watch the game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at home with people you live with. 

Suliman said people should continue regular handwashing, wear a mask and sit socially-distanced. 

‘That has been the main message for the last year,’ Suliman told WAVE 3

‘Even if people don’t feel it, there really has been a huge difference and that’s the biggest thing an individual can do to contribute to keeping people safe.’

Meanwhile, doctors across the country are bracing for a surge in COVID-19 infections as Americans prepare for the Super Bowl and host large gatherings

Meanwhile, doctors across the country are bracing for a surge in COVID-19 infections as Americans prepare for the Super Bowl and host large gatherings

Meanwhile, doctors across the country are bracing for a surge in COVID-19 infections as Americans prepare for the Super Bowl and host large gatherings

Dr Sally Suliman said that she's advising the public to watch the game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at home with people you live with. Pedestrians are seen out and about in Tampa ahead of the Super Bowl Sunday night

Dr Sally Suliman said that she's advising the public to watch the game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at home with people you live with. Pedestrians are seen out and about in Tampa ahead of the Super Bowl Sunday night

Dr Sally Suliman said that she’s advising the public to watch the game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at home with people you live with. Pedestrians are seen out and about in Tampa ahead of the Super Bowl Sunday night 

Hospitalizations from COVID-19 have continued to fall across the US and have now decreased daily for 25 days in a row as the vaccine rollout pushes forward. 

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said Sunday that 9,147,185 Americans have now received both doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, amounting to more than 2.5 per cent of the population.

At least one dose of a vaccine has been administered to 31,579,100 people, which equals to more than 9.1 per cent of the population.

The CDC reports that as of Sunday morning, 41,210,937 doses have been administered and 59,307,800 doses delivered across the country.

On Saturday, the COVID Tracking Project reported that there were 84,233 Americans hospitalized with COVID-19. 

This was the third day in a row that the number hospitalized remained below 90,000.  

Before this, there had been more than 90,000 COVID-19 patients hospitalized since November 27.

The US has reported more than 26.9 million infections since the start of the pandemic. More than 463,000 people have died from the virus.  

Most states have also administered both doses to more than 2,000 people out of every 100,000.

Only California, Nevada, Idaho, Arizona, Wisconsin Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia have administered less than this.

A total of 4,628,962 doses of a vaccine have been administered in long-term care facilities, the agency said.

West Virginia has fully vaccinated the most people with 5.6 per cent of its population having received two doses. 

According to COVID Tracking Project data, the US reported 113,927 new infections on Saturday and 2,983 new fatalities. Deaths continue to fall after a steep spike at the start of the year

According to COVID Tracking Project data, the US reported 113,927 new infections on Saturday and 2,983 new fatalities. Deaths continue to fall after a steep spike at the start of the year

According to COVID Tracking Project data, the US reported 113,927 new infections on Saturday and 2,983 new fatalities. Deaths continue to fall after a steep spike at the start of the year

Hospitalizations from COVID-19 have now decreased daily for 25 days in a row (depicted above)

Hospitalizations from COVID-19 have now decreased daily for 25 days in a row (depicted above)

Hospitalizations from COVID-19 have now decreased daily for 25 days in a row (depicted above)

On Friday, it was revealed that the coronavirus pandemic will drag on for another seven years at the current rate of vaccinations worldwide. 

It will take that long to reach Fauci’s estimate for the herd immunity threshold of 75 per cent of people inoculated globally, according to Bloomberg’s vaccination calculator. 

More than 4.5 million vaccines are being administered a day, for a total of 119.8 million shots given worldwide. 

Despite ranking sixth in the world for the pace of its vaccinations, the US is predicted to reach herd immunity just in time for New Year’s 2022.   

But all of this depends on whether the vaccines are effective against variants like those that emerged in South Africa and Brazil, which appear to dull the potency of shots. 

Nine vaccines are authorized worldwide, and at least two variants – those that emerged in South Africa and Brazil – might evade them. 

Link hienalouca.com

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