Boris Johnson takes midday ‘power executive business naps’ – a move favoured by Winston Churchill

Boris Johnson often takes a ‘power executive business nap’ in the middle of the day – a move favoured by his hero Winston Churchill. 

The Prime Minister has been known to shut his No. 10 office door for a half-an-hour kip in between vital meetings to ‘get him ready for the rest of the day,’ a Downing Street insider has claimed.

He appears to have been inspired by his hero Mr Churchill who also valued the power of a restful midday 40-winks.

The wartime leader once said: ‘Nature has not intended mankind to work from eight in the morning until midnight without that refreshment of blessed oblivion which, even if it only lasts twenty minutes, is sufficient to renew all the vital forces.’ 

Boris Johnson (pictured sitting with his eyes shut during a cricket match in 2018) often takes a 'power executive business nap' in the middle of the day - a move favoured by his hero Winston Churchill

Boris Johnson (pictured sitting with his eyes shut during a cricket match in 2018) often takes a 'power executive business nap' in the middle of the day - a move favoured by his hero Winston Churchill

Boris Johnson (pictured sitting with his eyes shut during a cricket match in 2018) often takes a ‘power executive business nap’ in the middle of the day – a move favoured by his hero Winston Churchill

A source close to Mr Johnson told Times Radio: ‘It would not be entirely uncommon in the diary for him to shut the door and have a kip for half an hour or so — a power executive business nap to get him ready for the rest of the day.’

Its no wonder Mr Johnson requires a quick powernap during his day. The PM kicks off his morning at 6am with a run around Buckingham Palace’s gardens.

And it appears he was inspired by his hero Mr Churchill (pictured in 1949) who also valued the power of a restful midday 40-winks

And it appears he was inspired by his hero Mr Churchill (pictured in 1949) who also valued the power of a restful midday 40-winks

And it appears he was inspired by his hero Mr Churchill (pictured in 1949) who also valued the power of a restful midday 40-winks 

He then enjoys a breakfast where he reads up on the news and messages his coworkers. 

Leonardo da Vinci, Bill Clinton and John F Kennedy were also said to favour midday snoozes.

But a Downing Street spokesperson, disputed the claims, saying the PM’s day is full of meetings leaving little time for anything else. 

Before he goes to sleep after his 12-hour working day – which can sometimes drag on for longer – the Mr Johnson works his way through huge stacks of paperwork contained in two large red boxes.

Times Radio conducted a report examining the current PM’s day-to-day routine – and how it differs to the leaders before him.

While Margaret Thatcher and Theresa May favoured late-night working, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Tony Blair all chose early morning starts.

Mr Johnson’s Covid leadership has been likened Winston Churchill’s approach several times during the pandemic. 

Margaret Thatcher in 1998

Margaret Thatcher in 1998

Theresa May in 2018

Theresa May in 2018

Margaret Thatcher (left in 1998) and Theresa May (right in 2018) both favoured late-night working

David Cameron in 2013

David Cameron in 2013

Tony Blair in 2019

Tony Blair in 2019

Gordon Brown, David Cameron (left in 2013) and Tony Blair (right in 2019) all chose early morning starts

Mr Johnson’s early statement that loved ones would die from Covid was slammed as scaremongering – while some praised the PM for his honesty with the public. 

Churchill was also criticised for making his first speech as Prime Minister about how the British people would need to expend ‘blood, toil, tears and sweat’ to win the war, yet it was the right thing to do.

In September 1939, there had been official estimations of the total number of deaths from German bombing in the several hundreds of thousands, figures not unlike the huge predicted Covid death tolls.

Boris Johnson during a Downing Street press briefing this month

Boris Johnson during a Downing Street press briefing this month

Winston Churchill in 1942

Winston Churchill in 1942

Mr Johnson’s (left) Covid leadership has been likened Winston Churchill’s (right) approach several times during the pandemic

These prompted the government to close schools and evacuate children – in wartime to the countryside, today to their homes.

Similar to the early lockdown days, some Britons engaged in panic-buying, hoarding and occasionally even looting during the Blitz – but they were condemned and despised by the majority of the population.

Far more widespread was an admirable altruistic instinct.

When on June 14, 1940, the War Office called for volunteers for what was to become the Home Guard, they expected half a million people to enlist.

In fact, one-and-a-half million did. 

Similarly, when the NHS asked for volunteers at the start of the pandemic, they expected around 100,000 to answer the call, whereas nearly three-quarters of a million Britons replied.

Link hienalouca.com

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