So what does this deal mean for you?


Visa-free travel for six months every year   

Will I still be able to go on holiday in Europe?

Yes. UK citizens can travel across Europe without a visa for up to six months in a year, and a maximum of 90 days within a 180-day period. This would have been the case even in a No Deal scenario. However, freedom to travel may continue to be constrained by emergency coronavirus restrictions. You should have at least six months left on your passport before you travel, as already advised by the Government. From 2022, UK nationals will also have to pay for a visa-waiver scheme to visit many EU countries. The fee is yet to be decided by the EU but it will cover three-year periods and allow people to enter the Schengen Area for up to 90 days within any 180-day period.

Will my European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) still work?

Yes, for now, and then the UK will provide its own version. All EHIC cards issued before the end of 2020 will be valid – but only until their expiry dates. After that, the UK will issue a new card called the UK Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC), but there are no further details yet on how to obtain it or from when it will be available.

Will I still be able to go on holiday in Europe? Yes. UK citizens can travel across Europe without a visa for up to six months in a year, and a maximum of 90 days within a 180-day period

Will I still be able to go on holiday in Europe? Yes. UK citizens can travel across Europe without a visa for up to six months in a year, and a maximum of 90 days within a 180-day period

Will I still be able to go on holiday in Europe? Yes. UK citizens can travel across Europe without a visa for up to six months in a year, and a maximum of 90 days within a 180-day period

What will the new card cover?

Like the EHIC, it will cover chronic or existing illnesses and routine maternity care as well as emergencies.

The Brexit agreement says any specialised treatment, such as dialysis or cancer treatment, ‘must be subject to a prior agreement between the insured person and the unit providing the treatment’ to ensure the treatment is available.

Can I still take my pet on holidays in Europe?

Yes, though pet passports will no longer be valid from January 1. It has been agreed that Britain will be given ‘part two listed’ status, allowing pets to travel within EU borders. Owners will need to ensure their pets have been vaccinated against rabies and microchipped to get an animal health certificate. You must obtain a new certificate ten days before travelling. The document will be valid for only four months and for a single trip. Dogs must already by law be microchipped in the UK. A consultation is under way to extend this to cats next year.  

Any surprises in store at the supermarket? 

Will my weekly groceries cost more? Hopefully not in the long-term. Businesses have welcomed the deal that allows tariff-free and quota-free access to one of the world's biggest markets

Will my weekly groceries cost more? Hopefully not in the long-term. Businesses have welcomed the deal that allows tariff-free and quota-free access to one of the world's biggest markets

Will my weekly groceries cost more? Hopefully not in the long-term. Businesses have welcomed the deal that allows tariff-free and quota-free access to one of the world’s biggest markets

Will my weekly groceries cost more?

Hopefully not in the long-term. Businesses have welcomed the deal that allows tariff-free and quota-free access to one of the world’s biggest markets. A No Deal Brexit would have added £3billion a year to the cost of food for UK consumers, according to the British Retail Consortium.

The trade body, which represents UK retailers, said households around the country could breathe a ‘collective sigh of relief’. However, chief executive Helen Dickinson warned the Government would need to act quickly to ‘reduce the checks and red tape’ that will come in on January 1.

Will the shelves be empty?

This is where we may have a problem. An overview published by the European Commission suggested the EU would immediately implement tough new checks on food products – with no grace period.

Leaders in British food and farming have warned that this, plus the chaos in Dover and last-minute nature of the deal, is likely to result in some price rises. They also fear perishable food will become caught in border queues. The UK’s food chain could well be ‘slower, more complex and more expensive for months if not years’, according to the Cold Chain Federation. 

Keeping an eye on the crooks 

Will we know if offenders come to UK from the EU? Yes ... to an extent. As expected, UK police and intelligence agencies are to be cut off from the EU's most sensitive real-time crime databases

Will we know if offenders come to UK from the EU? Yes ... to an extent. As expected, UK police and intelligence agencies are to be cut off from the EU's most sensitive real-time crime databases

Will we know if offenders come to UK from the EU? Yes … to an extent. As expected, UK police and intelligence agencies are to be cut off from the EU’s most sensitive real-time crime databases

Will we know if offenders come to UK from the EU?

Yes … to an extent. As expected, UK police and intelligence agencies are to be cut off from the EU’s most sensitive real-time crime databases. But security services will still have access to crucial air passenger data, criminal record information, and DNA, fingerprint and vehicle registration data through the PNR and Prüm databases.

Can we catch criminals who flee Britain?

Not as easily. We will no longer be part of the European Arrest Warrant system, which allows swift extradition of criminals between EU countries. It is not clear what will replace this. Our police will, however, still be able to extradite criminals via Interpol and fall back on the 1957 European Convention on Extradition.    

That home from home could cost a little more 

What about my holiday house? We will probably have to wait for the full document to see if there are any safeguards for Britons with homes abroad

What about my holiday house? We will probably have to wait for the full document to see if there are any safeguards for Britons with homes abroad

What about my holiday house? We will probably have to wait for the full document to see if there are any safeguards for Britons with homes abroad

What about my holiday house?

We will probably have to wait for the full document to see if there are any safeguards for Britons with homes abroad.

Experts have already warned that property taxes could rise to higher rates which apply only to non-EU citizens.

Property insurance costs could also rise and mortgages become more difficult to obtain for British citizens looking to buy houses or apartments in the EU.

But any owners will continue to be protected by the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the European Convention on Human Rights.

What if I live in the EU?

There was little reassurance for Britons already living in Europe, whose rights have so far been safeguarded by the UK’s 2019 withdrawal agreement.

From January 1, the UK will no longer have freedom of movement, meaning Britons will have to obtain a visa if they want to stay in the EU longer than 90 days.

No information has emerged yet as to whether current expats will be afforded any concessions.

Any expats continuing to enjoy their favourite television programmes from home should brace themselves – it may become harder for them to watch UK channels abroad.

British TV and video-on-demand providers will no longer be able to offer their service across Europe unless they relocate part of their business to an EU member state.  

The pound in your pocket 

Will it be harder to access my money?

It is uncertain. Banks may have to apply for a licence to work in each different EU jurisdiction, which is costly and time-consuming.

Will it cost more to get currency on holiday?

Not if current rates are anything to by. Sterling surged ahead of the deal – a good thing if you’re on holiday on the continent as a stronger pound means your money is worth more in euros. 

Take care when you call 

Will I pay extra to use my mobile abroad? Probably not ¿ as long as you¿re careful

Will I pay extra to use my mobile abroad? Probably not ¿ as long as you¿re careful

Will I pay extra to use my mobile abroad? Probably not – as long as you’re careful

Will I pay extra to use my mobile abroad?

Probably not – as long as you’re careful. The EU ban on roaming charges will end on January 1 but, as part of the deal, the UK and EU have agreed to co-operate on ‘fair and transparent rates for international mobile roaming’.

Fortunately, four main providers in the UK – EE, 02, Vodafone and Three – have said they have no plans to reintroduce roaming charges.

It’s business as usual… with a few new rules 

Can I still work in the EU?

With a little more difficulty. Britons will no longer have complete freedom to work or start a business in the EU. However, arrangements have been made to facilitate short-term business trips. For any stays longer than 90 days they will need a visa.

What if I’m a specialist in my field?

Employees in highly skilled jobs who have been seconded to the EU are subject to less strict rules, with managers allowed to stay for up to three years and trainees for one year.

That said, it will probably be harder for doctors, nurses, dentists, engineers and vets wanting to practise abroad because there will be no more automatic recognition of qualifications. Instead, they will have to seek new recognition in whichever member state they choose to go to.

Can I study abroad?

Yes. The UK has pulled out of the EU-funded student exchange programme Erasmus for financial reasons, but it is being replaced by a new scheme named after Bletchley Park code breaker Alan Turing that will allow British students to go to universities worldwide.

Keep on motoring 

Can I still drive in Europe? Yes. The UK Mission to the EU said last night that those with a driving licence issued in the UK would not need to use an International Drivers Permit in the EU, as had previously been thought likely

Can I still drive in Europe? Yes. The UK Mission to the EU said last night that those with a driving licence issued in the UK would not need to use an International Drivers Permit in the EU, as had previously been thought likely

Can I still drive in Europe? Yes. The UK Mission to the EU said last night that those with a driving licence issued in the UK would not need to use an International Drivers Permit in the EU, as had previously been thought likely

Can I still drive in Europe?

Yes. The UK Mission to the EU said last night that those with a driving licence issued in the UK would not need to use an International Drivers Permit in the EU, as had previously been thought likely.

How do I get the extra documents?

An international driving permit is available at the Post Office for £5.50. You also need a car insurance green card which acts as proof that you are insured in the UK through your provider, which can take up to six weeks.

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