EXCLUSIVE Nikki Manashe tells how her ‘heart is breaking’ after losing one of her twins

Alex Reid’s fiancée Nikki Manashe has told how her ‘heart is breaking’ after miscarrying one of her unborn baby twins amid her seven-year fertility battle. 

Nikki, 35, explained to MailOnline that she is ‘balancing sadness with happiness’ after finding out she and Alex, 45, had lost one twin at her seven-and-a-half-week scan at Harley Street Fertility Clinic, in London, on December 2. 

The blogger, who is now nine weeks and two days pregnant, said she is battling with a ‘really strange grieving process’ after losing one baby, while her other is still growing.

Emotional: Alex Reid's fiancée Nikki Manashe has told how her 'heart is breaking' after miscarrying one of her unborn baby twins following her seven-year fertility battle

Emotional: Alex Reid's fiancée Nikki Manashe has told how her 'heart is breaking' after miscarrying one of her unborn baby twins following her seven-year fertility battle

Emotional: Alex Reid’s fiancée Nikki Manashe has told how her ‘heart is breaking’ after miscarrying one of her unborn baby twins following her seven-year fertility battle 

Nikki described how the loss of one of her babies was due to a condition called vanishing twin syndrome, which occurs when the embryo disappears into the uterus. 

Speaking to MailOnline, Nikki said: ‘I haven’t planned on ever having twins – who does? 

‘But once I was pregnant with two babies I wanted them both so much. I had started planning to move to a new house in the countryside and visualised and dreamed of two babies growing up together.

‘I felt like all this hard work had paid off and I had two amazing babies at the end of a very dark sad tunnel.’ 

Heartbreaking: Nikki, 35, found out she and Alex, 45, had lost one twin at her seven-and-a-half-week scan at Harley Street Fertility Clinic, in London, on December 2

Heartbreaking: Nikki, 35, found out she and Alex, 45, had lost one twin at her seven-and-a-half-week scan at Harley Street Fertility Clinic, in London, on December 2

Heartbreaking: Nikki, 35, found out she and Alex, 45, had lost one twin at her seven-and-a-half-week scan at Harley Street Fertility Clinic, in London, on December 2

Nikki, who has undergone four cycles of IVF, told how Alex accompanied her to the clinic and waited in the car after he took a Covid-19 test and was isolating with her. 

Speaking about the scan, she said: ‘I put Alex on FaceTime to hear the heartbeat because that was the good news. I didn’t really speak after that.  

‘He was actually in the car because we knew the week before that one baby had a strong heartbeat and the other one had to catch up. In my head, without being negative, I had been here before.

‘I remember the signs and what the doctor was saying. He took a Covid test and stayed with me for three days and isolated with me.’ 

Nikki added: ‘I told him the news when he got inside the car. He was devastated. It was nice to just have someone with me.’ 

Speaking about the scan, she said: 'I put Alex (pictured) on FaceTime to hear the heartbeat because that was the good news. I didn't really speak after that'

Speaking about the scan, she said: 'I put Alex (pictured) on FaceTime to hear the heartbeat because that was the good news. I didn't really speak after that'

Speaking about the scan, she said: ‘I put Alex (pictured) on FaceTime to hear the heartbeat because that was the good news. I didn’t really speak after that’

Honest: Nikki shared the devastating news to her Instagram on Sunday where she told how she 'woke up to bleeding' in the early hours and called 999 in fear she was losing the other twin

Honest: Nikki shared the devastating news to her Instagram on Sunday where she told how she 'woke up to bleeding' in the early hours and called 999 in fear she was losing the other twin

Honest: Nikki shared the devastating news to her Instagram on Sunday where she told how she ‘woke up to bleeding’ in the early hours and called 999 in fear she was losing the other twin

Heartfelt: Alex also shared a post to his Instagram along with a scan picture and penned: 'We will never forget the other baby. Who will now be a guardian angel for his/her twin'

Heartfelt: Alex also shared a post to his Instagram along with a scan picture and penned: 'We will never forget the other baby. Who will now be a guardian angel for his/her twin'

Heartfelt: Alex also shared a post to his Instagram along with a scan picture and penned: ‘We will never forget the other baby. Who will now be a guardian angel for his/her twin’

What is Vanishing Twin Syndrome?  

-Vanishing Twin Syndrome is when multiple embryos develop in the uterus

-But soon one of the embryos can’t be detected 

-Symptoms include cramping and bleeding 

-Diagnosed during an ultrasound

-The unborn twin, if lost in the very early stages, is usually ‘reabsorbed into your placenta and into the baby that you’re carrying’

<!—->Advertisement

She continued: ‘It is just a very surreal emotion because you should be happy. My heart is breaking as I am living with only one baby now. 

‘I have lost a baby while remaining pregnant and it is a really strange grieving process that I can’t describe.

‘I have lost babies in the past but to lose one and have one survive is like I am balancing a sadness with happiness.’  

Nikki, who is due on July 18 – the day before Alex’s birthday, has a high number of natural killer cells that causes her body to ‘fight pregnancy like an infection’. 

The blogger, who had her frozen transfer on October 30, must isolate from Alex until she is 28 weeks due to the immune-suppressing nature of her medication.  

Nikki shared the devastating news to her Instagram on Sunday where she also told how she ‘woke up to bleeding’ in the early hours and called 999 in fear she was losing the other twin.  

She had emergency scan at the Ultrasound Diagnostic Centre and told the blood was due to ‘implantation bleeding’ and a 5cm cyst but she and the baby were safe. 

Alex also shared a post to his Instagram along with a scan picture, writing: ‘We will never forget the other baby. Who will now be a guardian angel for his/her twin.’  

Nikki, who previously revealed she had been diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder following her five miscarriages, said the ‘hardest part’ of her pregnancy is the ‘anxiety’. 

She explained: ‘Each time that I have to visit a hospital and a clinic the panic attacks I have, the endless nights of not sleeping, and the reminders of what has happened in the past just brings it back to the forefront of my brain again.’ 

Nikki will have a Harmony test at the clinic next week which analyses the DNA from the foetus that is present in the mother’s blood. 

The test gives an indication of whether the foetus is of high or low risk of having Down’s, Edwards’ and Patau’s syndromes as well as finding out sex of the baby. 

In it together: The couple plan to spend Christmas together with their 'two fur babies and lots of food' due to Nikki having to isolate with her immune-suppressing medication

In it together: The couple plan to spend Christmas together with their 'two fur babies and lots of food' due to Nikki having to isolate with her immune-suppressing medication

In it together: The couple plan to spend Christmas together with their ‘two fur babies and lots of food’ due to Nikki having to isolate with her immune-suppressing medication

Nikki described how ‘every day is scary now’ and has ‘never felt more tired’ but was reassured by her doctor that is ‘normal’ and so she is trying to relax her mind by spending time outdoors. 

The couple, who run a boot camp, plan to spend Christmas together with their ‘two fur babies and lots of food’ due to Nikki having to isolate with her immune-suppressing medication. 

Nikki runs the blog, www.ivfchasingdreams.com, Instagram @ivf_chasing_dream and has since started a YouTube channel – IVF Chasing Dreams. 

How does IVF work?

In-vitro fertilisation, known as IVF, is a medical procedure in which a woman has an already-fertilised egg inserted into her womb to become pregnant.

It is used when couples are unable to conceive naturally, and a sperm and egg are removed from their bodies and combined in a laboratory before the embryo is inserted into the woman.

Once the embryo is in the womb, the pregnancy should continue as normal.

The procedure can be done using eggs and sperm from a couple or those from donors.

Guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends that IVF should be offered on the NHS to women under 43 who have been trying to conceive through regular unprotected sex for two years.

People can also pay for IVF privately, which costs an average of £3,348 for a single cycle, according to figures published in January 2018, and there is no guarantee of success.

The NHS says success rates for women under 35 are about 29 per cent, with the chance of a successful cycle reducing as they age.

Around eight million babies are thought to have been born due to IVF since the first ever case, British woman Louise Brown, was born in 1978.

Chances of success

The success rate of IVF depends on the age of the woman undergoing treatment, as well as the cause of the infertility (if it’s known).

Younger women are more likely to have a successful pregnancy.

IVF isn’t usually recommended for women over the age of 42 because the chances of a successful pregnancy are thought to be too low.

Between 2014 and 2016 the percentage of IVF treatments that resulted in a live birth was:

29 per cent for women under 35

23 per cent for women aged 35 to 37

15 per cent for women aged 38 to 39

9 per cent for women aged 40 to 42

3 per cent for women aged 43 to 44

2 per cent for women aged over 44

 

<!—->Advertisement

Link hienalouca.com

(Total views: 8 Time, 1 visits per day)

Leave a Reply