Tory MP Caroline Nokes admits parking car across parents driveway to make sure they shield

A Conservative MP has admitted parking her car across her parents driveway to force them to shield and not leave the house during the coronavirus lockdown. 

Caroline Nokes, 48, said she had kept her parents ‘locked up’ since March, so they wouldn’t ‘increase the burden’ on the NHS.

The Conservative MP also welcomed the Tier 2 restrictions imposed on her Romsey and Southampton North constituency, in Hampshire, saying taking risks ‘strikes me as foolhardy’. 

Speaking on BBC‘s Politics Live on Monday, former Minister of State for Immigration Nokes said: ‘I’ve kept my parents locked up since March. Literally locked up.

‘I’ve done all of their shopping for them, run every errand, and at one point parked my car over their driveway so they couldn’t get out, because I am absolutely determined they are not going to increase the burden on our brilliant health service.’

She added: ‘Our brilliant frontline workers have been working incredibly hard over months and are exhausted, so to take unnecessary risks with the NHS now strikes me as being extremely foolhardy.

‘That’s why I supported the measures last week. I’ve seen my area go into Tier 2, where there are still restrictions on the way people can go about their lives.’ 

When questioned after the show about her comments on her strict regime to protect her parents, she said they were made as a ‘lighthearted comment’, adding: ‘But, I want my parents, and everybody’s parents to be safe from this virus.

‘They are in their late 70s and therefore among the most vulnerable.’

Ms Nokes’ father Roy Perry, 77, was a Conservative councillor for almost 50 years and was leader of Hampshire County Council until 2019 when he retired.

He also served as an MEP between 1994 and 2002.  

Her mother Veronica is also thought to be in her late 70s. 

Under shielding measures, those most at risk are asked to stay at home to avoid catching the virus. 

Speaking on BBC's Politics Live on Monday, former Minister of State for Immigration Nokes said: 'I’ve kept my parents locked up since March. Literally locked up'

Speaking on BBC's Politics Live on Monday, former Minister of State for Immigration Nokes said: 'I’ve kept my parents locked up since March. Literally locked up'

Speaking on BBC’s Politics Live on Monday, former Minister of State for Immigration Nokes said: ‘I’ve kept my parents locked up since March. Literally locked up’

Ms Nokes' father Roy Perry, 77, was a Conservative councillor for almost 50 years and was leader of Hampshire County Council until 2019 when he retired. Her mother Veronica is also thought to be in her 70s

Ms Nokes' father Roy Perry, 77, was a Conservative councillor for almost 50 years and was leader of Hampshire County Council until 2019 when he retired. Her mother Veronica is also thought to be in her 70s

Ms Nokes’ father Roy Perry, 77, was a Conservative councillor for almost 50 years and was leader of Hampshire County Council until 2019 when he retired. Her mother Veronica is also thought to be in her 70s

The Conservative MP also welcomed the Tier 2 restrictions imposed on her Romsey and Southampton North constituency, in Hampshire, saying taking risks 'strikes me as foolhardy'

The Conservative MP also welcomed the Tier 2 restrictions imposed on her Romsey and Southampton North constituency, in Hampshire, saying taking risks 'strikes me as foolhardy'

The Conservative MP also welcomed the Tier 2 restrictions imposed on her Romsey and Southampton North constituency, in Hampshire, saying taking risks ‘strikes me as foolhardy’

People in the highest risk group include those having cancer treatment, people who have had organ transplants, those with severe lung conditions like cystic fibrosis or COPD, people with kidney disease and pregnant women with heart disease.

Over 70s are included in a slightly lower risk group known as ‘clinically vulnerable’ and face less specific advice to ‘stay at home as much as possible, to carefully follow the rules and minimise contact with others’.

Shielders get priority access to supermarket delivery slots and receive calls from NHS volunteers. 

They are advised not to go to the shops or pharmacies, and should not go to work if they can’t do their job from home.

Health chiefs have previously said the guidance has ‘always been’ advisory but urged the vulnerable to ‘keep themselves as safe as possible’.

Shielding was in place for most of the first lockdown, before ending in the summer as the first shutdown lessened. 

A revised form of shielding was re-introduced ahead of the second lockdown in November. 

Although some finer details have changed — the vulnerable won’t have to protect themselves from members of their own household, and can go outside to exercise or visit a doctor — the ‘stay at home at all times’ message is broadly the same.  

Link hienalouca.com

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