Trisha Goddard is left in tears as she reveals she would cover her face in talcum powder as a child

Trisha Goddard was left in tears as she spoke about covering her face in talculm powder to ‘pretend to be white’ as a child.

The presenter, 62, became emotional during her appearance on Monday’s Good Morning Britain with Lorraine as she detailed the way systemic racism impacted her mental health when she was young.

Breaking down in tears, Trisha told Lorraine: ‘When I was young I used to get talcum powder and mix it with water and put it on my face to pretend to be white.’ 

Emotional: Trisha Goddard broke down in tears as she revealed on Monday's Good Morning Britain that she would cover her face in talcum powder 'to pretend to be white' as a child

Emotional: Trisha Goddard broke down in tears as she revealed on Monday's Good Morning Britain that she would cover her face in talcum powder 'to pretend to be white' as a child

Emotional: Trisha Goddard broke down in tears as she revealed on Monday’s Good Morning Britain that she would cover her face in talcum powder ‘to pretend to be white’ as a child 

Trisha also spoke passionately about her mother Mary Agnes Fortune who came to the UK as part of the Windrush generation, and she reflected on the 2018 Windrush scandal, which has seen over 80 people wrongfully deported by the Home Office.

Getting emotional once again while speaking about current events and how the Windrush generation have been told they’re not British, Trisha said: ‘I’ve heard that so many times, mum always worked double shifts, both my mum and my dad did.

‘Both my parents worked two jobs to put me and my sisters through school. I miss her, just talking about her makes me very emotional.

‘In some way I’m glad that she isn’t here to see what’s going on and tell her the racial abuse I’ve received.’

Tearful: On how racism impacted her mental health, Trisha told Lorraine: 'When I was young I used to get talcum powder and mix it with water and put it on my face to pretend to be white'

Tearful: On how racism impacted her mental health, Trisha told Lorraine: 'When I was young I used to get talcum powder and mix it with water and put it on my face to pretend to be white'

Tearful: On how racism impacted her mental health, Trisha told Lorraine: ‘When I was young I used to get talcum powder and mix it with water and put it on my face to pretend to be white’

In tears: Trisha also said she was glad her mother Mary Agnes Fortune, who came to the UK as part of the Windrush generation, couldn't experience the 2018 Windrush scandal

In tears: Trisha also said she was glad her mother Mary Agnes Fortune, who came to the UK as part of the Windrush generation, couldn't experience the 2018 Windrush scandal

In tears: Trisha also said she was glad her mother Mary Agnes Fortune, who came to the UK as part of the Windrush generation, couldn’t experience the 2018 Windrush scandal

Trisha called for a change in education so that children can be taught about the Windrush generation who were invited to move to the UK from from Caribbean countries between 1948 and 1971.

‘They were actually asked to come to Britain after the Second World War and really it was the crème de la crème of the commonwealth,’ Trisha explained. ‘I think I have my mum’s log when she came over and she was 26, you had such skilled people working in transport and nurses like my mum.’

She added: ‘One of the problems I think, and there’s been a lot of talk of systemic racism, I don’t think we teach history in the way we should.

Heartbreaking: Of how the Windrush generation have been told they're not British, Trisha said: 'I’ve heard that so many times'

Heartbreaking: Of how the Windrush generation have been told they're not British, Trisha said: 'I’ve heard that so many times'

Heartbreaking: Of how the Windrush generation have been told they’re not British, Trisha said: ‘I’ve heard that so many times’ 

Changes: Trisha called for a change in education so that children can be taught about the Windrush generation and how those from Caribbean countries were invited to move to the UK

Changes: Trisha called for a change in education so that children can be taught about the Windrush generation and how those from Caribbean countries were invited to move to the UK

Changes: Trisha called for a change in education so that children can be taught about the Windrush generation and how those from Caribbean countries were invited to move to the UK

‘People from all over the commonwealth who came to the UK at the time it took 6 weeks to travel, she couldn’t be there when her gran died, and she couldn’t go back until I could get her a ticket when I was in my 20s.

‘They gave up their lives for a new life to help Britain so this wind rush scandal is a real kick in the teeth.’

Trisha went on to add that her family ‘worked their guts out’ to support Trisha and her siblings, as she claimed: ‘I have to work twice as good to be half as good as her.’

Gushing: Trisha went on to add that her family 'worked their guts out' to support Trisha and her siblings, as she claimed: 'I have to work twice as good to be half as good as her'

Gushing: Trisha went on to add that her family 'worked their guts out' to support Trisha and her siblings, as she claimed: 'I have to work twice as good to be half as good as her'

Gushing: Trisha went on to add that her family ‘worked their guts out’ to support Trisha and her siblings, as she claimed: ‘I have to work twice as good to be half as good as her’

Difficult: Of the 2018 Windrush scandal, which saw over 80 people wrongfully deported from the UK by the Home Office, she added: 'This scandal would have broken their spirits'

Difficult: Of the 2018 Windrush scandal, which saw over 80 people wrongfully deported from the UK by the Home Office, she added: 'This scandal would have broken their spirits'

Difficult: Of the 2018 Windrush scandal, which saw over 80 people wrongfully deported from the UK by the Home Office, she added: ‘This scandal would have broken their spirits’

Of the 2018 Windrush scandal, which saw over 80 people wrongfully deported from the UK by the Home Office, she added: ‘In many ways seeing this scandal would have broken their spirits after years of sacrifice for this country.’

Trisha also spoke passionately about the Black Lives Matter movement, saying she hopes it will create real change ‘slowly but surely’ with education.

Becoming emotional once more, Trisha admitted: ‘It is pretty tough at the moment Lorraine, my mum would be outraged “how dare you cry on television”.’   

Making a difference: Trisha also spoke passionately about the Black Lives Matter movement, saying she hopes it will create real change 'slowly but surely' with education

Making a difference: Trisha also spoke passionately about the Black Lives Matter movement, saying she hopes it will create real change 'slowly but surely' with education

Making a difference: Trisha also spoke passionately about the Black Lives Matter movement, saying she hopes it will create real change ‘slowly but surely’ with education

Moving: Becoming emotional once more, Trisha admitted: 'It is pretty tough at the moment Lorraine, my mum would be outraged "how dare you cry on television"'

Moving: Becoming emotional once more, Trisha admitted: 'It is pretty tough at the moment Lorraine, my mum would be outraged "how dare you cry on television"'

Moving: Becoming emotional once more, Trisha admitted: ‘It is pretty tough at the moment Lorraine, my mum would be outraged “how dare you cry on television”‘

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