New York state has 44 cases of coronavirus

The number of people who have tested positive for coronavirus in New York state has risen to 44 as at least 4,000 people have been urged to self-quarantine to prevent the spread of the disease.

This afternoon, Governer Andrew Cuomo said that ‘most’ of the cases are linked to a Manhattan lawyer who tested positive earlier in the week. 

There are now 33 cases in Westchester County, five in New York City, four in Nassau County and two in Rockland County.

Details of all the new cases were not immediately clear, but Cuomo said there were ‘a number of young people’ and he suspects ‘they are related to existing cases. At least five people have been hospitalized across the state.

There are also 44 people in mandatory quarantine, including 33 in Westchester, nine in New York City and one in Nassau County.  

NEW YORK STATE CORONAVIRUS CASES 

WESTCHESTER COUNTY: 33

NEW YORK CITY: 5

NASSAU COUNTY: 4

ROCKLAND COUNTY: 2

Some of the new 22 new cases announced this morning include a man in Manhattan, three members of the Young Israel congregation in New Rochelle, two friends of the lawyer, two staff members who live in Rockland County and worked at a bat mitzvah, and three people connected to New York Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital.

Cuomo said that about 4,000 people who live in New York state are under ‘precautionary quarantine’. It includes at least 2,700 people living in New York City. This means they were in the proximity of someone who tested positive, or returned from traveling to one of the coronavirus hot spots – Italy, Iran, China, South Korea or Japan. 

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo confirmed that 29 of the 33 cases in the state are linked to a Manhattan lawyer who tested positive earlier in the week. Eleven of those were new cases reported this morning

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo confirmed that 29 of the 33 cases in the state are linked to a Manhattan lawyer who tested positive earlier in the week. Eleven of those were new cases reported this morning

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio confirmed the number of people who have tested positive for coronavirus has risen to five. The latest case is a man in his 50s with 'mild' symptoms

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio confirmed the number of people who have tested positive for coronavirus has risen to five. The latest case is a man in his 50s with 'mild' symptoms

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo confirmed ‘most’ of the cases in the state are linked to a Manhattan lawyer who tested positive earlier in the week. Eleven of those were new cases reported this morning. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said the city’s latest case is a man in his 50s with ‘mild’ symptoms

There are 44 confirmed cases in New York state. This includes two cases in Rockland County, five in New York City, 33 in Westchester and four in Nassau County

There are 44 confirmed cases in New York state. This includes two cases in Rockland County, five in New York City, 33 in Westchester and four in Nassau County

There are 44 confirmed cases in New York state. This includes two cases in Rockland County, five in New York City, 33 in Westchester and four in Nassau County

This morning, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio confirmed that a man in his 50s tested positive on Thursday. He is also linked to the the lawyer, who was the first reported case in the city. 

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF CORONAVIRUS? 

Like other coronaviruses, including those that cause the common cold and that triggered SARS, COVID-19 is a respiratory illness.  

  • The most common symptoms are: 
  • Fever 
  • Dry cough 
  • Shortness of breath
  • Difficulty breathing 
  • Fatigue 

Although having a runny nose doesn’t rule out coronavirus, it doesn’t thus far appear to be a primary symptom. 

Most people only become mildly ill, but the infection can turn serious and even deadly, especially for those who are older or have underlying health conditions.  

In these cases, patients develop pneumonia, which can cause: 

  • Potentially with yellow, green or bloody mucus
  • Fever, sweating and shaking chills
  • Shortness of breath 
  • Rapid or shallow breathing 
  • Pain when breathing, especially when breathing deeply or coughing 
  • Low appetite, energy and fatigue 
  • Nausea and vomiting (more common in children) 
  • Confusion (more common in elderly people)
  • Some patients have also reported diarrhea and kidney failure has occassionally been a complication. 

Avoid people with these symtpoms. If you develop them, call your health care provider before going to the hospital or doctor, so they and you can prepare to minimize possivle exposure if they suspect you have coronavirus. 

 

 

‘We have one new case, this is a man in his 50s, who lives in Manhattan. He has mild symptoms at this moment, and we are testing his family. Disease detectives are following up with his contacts,’ he said.

‘He is associated in some way with the lawyer who lives in Westchester and worked in Midtown.’

The lawyer, in his 50s, has been hospitalized at New York Presbyterian Columbia in the intensive care unit since Monday. He commuted daily from New Rochelle in Westchester, where he lives, on the Metro-North railway line daily to Manhattan for work.

Earlier today, it was revealed that the rabbi of the synagogue attended by a Manhattan lawyer and his family who have all tested positive for coronavirus has now also been diagnosed with the disease. 

Rabbi Reuven Fink, of the Young Israel of New Rochelle synagogue, fell ill after coming into contact with an infected congregant, believed to be the 50-year-old attorney. 

Rabbi Fink also teaches at Yevisha University in Manhattan, which the lawyer’s 20-year-old son attends. 

On Thursday, the university issued a statement naming Fink in order to tell his students to self-isolate as a precaution. 

He is one of 17 people the lawyer, who was the second person in New York to be diagnosed, has infected. 

‘We are taking every precaution by canceling all classes on Wilf Campus in Washington Heights for Wednesday March 4, 2020.

‘This includes all in-person graduate courses on that campus as well as at the boys’ high school.’ 

Additionally, the Frisch School in Paramus, New Jersey, has closed due to fears that some of its students might have been exposed to the Manhattan lawyer who lives in Westchester who has the virus and has now infected 17 others with it. 

PIX 11 reports that school staff are concerned the students attended a bat mitzvah in New Rochelle and also a hockey game in Riverdale, where the lawyer’s daughter attends school. 

Meanwhile a hotel in a Baltimore suburb yesterday canceled the reservation of the Yeshiva University men’s basketball team over fears of the virus. 

Later Thursday, Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore said the games on campus involving Yeshiva and other teams in the NCAA Division III basketball tournament would be played without fans in the stands because of three confirmed cases of coronavirus in Maryland.

The Young Israel of New Rochelle synagogue in the affluent New York suburb which is at the center of the Big Apple's growing outbreak of the deadly COVID-19 disease

The Young Israel of New Rochelle synagogue in the affluent New York suburb which is at the center of the Big Apple's growing outbreak of the deadly COVID-19 disease

The Young Israel of New Rochelle synagogue in the affluent New York suburb which is at the center of the Big Apple’s growing outbreak of the deadly COVID-19 disease

Yeshiva University, where the rabbi teaches two classes, named him on Thursday to warn students of his to self-quarantine

Yeshiva University, where the rabbi teaches two classes, named him on Thursday to warn students of his to self-quarantine

Yeshiva University, where the rabbi teaches two classes, named him on Thursday to warn students of his to self-quarantine

This chart shows the contact the Manhattan lawyer initial contact with people, and places he went to where people have been tested for coronavirus

This chart shows the contact the Manhattan lawyer initial contact with people, and places he went to where people have been tested for coronavirus

This chart shows the contact the Manhattan lawyer initial contact with people, and places he went to where people have been tested for coronavirus

This map shows where the Manhattan lawyer linked to 'most' of the coronavirus cases traveled to, or may have come into contact with people with.

This map shows where the Manhattan lawyer linked to 'most' of the coronavirus cases traveled to, or may have come into contact with people with.

This map shows where the Manhattan lawyer linked to ‘most’ of the coronavirus cases traveled to, or may have come into contact with people with. 

4,000 people across New York state have been put in precautionary quarantine for 14 days

4,000 people across New York state have been put in precautionary quarantine for 14 days

4,000 people across New York state have been put in precautionary quarantine for 14 days

CUOMO BLASTS GOVT. FOR LACK OF TESTING 

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo blasted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Trump administration over their mixed messages regarding coronvirus testing.

In a press conference on Friday, Cuomo cited the contradictory statements issued by the federal health agency and Vice President Mike Pence.

‘I don’t understand CDC’s instructions, they say anyone can get tested if they want…but Pence says we don’t have enough tests,’ Cuomo told reporters.

‘How can you bring in more people into the pipeline than you can address at the end of the pipeline?’ he said.

‘That is not only bad government and poor planning, it will increase the fear.’

It comes just hours after Dr Anthony Fauci, a top official at the NIH, said he can’t make any promises about when enough test kits will be made available.

Cuomo argued that people will be fearful because they won’t understand why doctors don’t have the capacity to test them.

‘Their position is absurd and nonsensical,’ the governor said.

‘I think the anxiety and the fear is a bigger problem than the virus.’

Cuomo also lamented that CDC and FDA were slow in approving New York’s use of private labs as well as giving New York State’s Wadsworth Lab And NYC’s Public-Health Lab permission to test for the virus.

 

Hilton spokeswoman Laura Ford said the hotel in Pikesville is an independently owned and operated property. Hotel management did not immediately return a call seeking comment.  

Health officials said he has severe pneumonia that put him in more danger than others from the disease. 

His family, including his wife, son and daughter, remain quarantined in their home in New Rochelle. A neighbor, who initially drove the attorney to the hospital when he started suffering symptoms last Friday night, is also under self-quarantine at home. 

One thousand people who may have come into contact with the attorney, who commuted every day to midtown Manhattan, have been ordered to self-quarantine. 

Meanwhile, the all-girls Spence School on Manhattan’s Upper East Side closed on Friday for ‘sanitization’ as did the all-boys Collegiate School on the Upper West Side due to a family with ties to both that are being monitored. There are no known ties to the Manhattan lawyer. The schools are set to reopen on Monday

Yeshiva coach Elliot Steinmetz said the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Pikesville canceled the reservation, forcing the team to book rooms at a different hotel.

‘I made it very clear to the hotel that it’s discrimination,’ Steinmetz said.

‘I basically said to them: ‘Do you have a checkbox on your website that says that you’ve been in an area with suspected coronavirus?’ And they said no. 

‘So I said: ‘Is it just for the guests of Yeshiva University?’ And they said yes. I told them that that’s called discrimination.’ 

Yevisha University's Washington Heights campus in Manhattan. The rabbi's students have been advised to self-isolate

Yevisha University's Washington Heights campus in Manhattan. The rabbi's students have been advised to self-isolate

Yevisha University’s Washington Heights campus in Manhattan. The rabbi’s students have been advised to self-isolate

The all-girls Spence School on Manhattan's Upper East Side is closed on Friday due to a family with ties to the school who are now under quarantine

The all-girls Spence School on Manhattan's Upper East Side is closed on Friday due to a family with ties to the school who are now under quarantine

The all-girls Spence School on Manhattan’s Upper East Side is closed on Friday due to a family with ties to the school who are now under quarantine 

The all-boys Collegiate School in New York City's Upper West Side has also closed

The all-boys Collegiate School in New York City's Upper West Side has also closed

The all-boys Collegiate School in New York City’s Upper West Side has also closed

According to The New York Post, the family likely has a child at each school. One of the parents recently returned from an unspecified international trip and is awaiting test results in quarantine.

The death toll from the respiratory illness rose to 14 in the US, with two more deaths in King County in Washington state being reported. At least nine people have died in an outbreak at a nursing facility in the Seattle suburb of Kirkland.  More than 250 people across the country have been infected.

MTA in New York City has stepped up its cleaning protocols, and are disinfecting stations, subway cars and trains regularly

MTA in New York City has stepped up its cleaning protocols, and are disinfecting stations, subway cars and trains regularly

MTA in New York City has stepped up its cleaning protocols, and are disinfecting stations, subway cars and trains regularly

———————————————————————————————————————

EVERY NEW YORKER WHO HAS ‘RECENTLY’ RETURNED FROM FIVE CORONAVIRUS HOT-SPOT COUNTRIES IS TOLD TO SELF-QUARANTINE FOR TWO WEEKS

Every New Yorker who has traveled and recently returned from China, Japan, Iran, Italy and South Korea have been told by the city’s mayor to self-quarantine for 14 days as a coronavirus precaution. 

CORONAVIRUS HOTSPOT COUNTRIES

De Blasio is asking all New Yorkers who have recently returned from these countries to self-quarantine; 

China 

Japan 

South Korea

Iran 

Italy  

Mayor Bill de Blasio made the recommendation at a press conference on Thursday where he struck a more concerned tone than in previous days and described the spread of the disease in New York City as ‘unpredictable and worrisome’. 

‘Our level of concern is rising for sure… for all New Yorkers, if you have recently returned from one of the five countries, we’re asking you to isolate yourself as a precaution for 14 days. 

‘Obviously, if you have symptoms then you need to get to care and testing,’ he said.  

He did not specify what he meant by ‘recently’ but he later referenced a ‘time-frame’. 

In most cases with the virus so far, the window of concern is 14 days.  

Tests are now being carried out by the hundreds to determine who the four New Yorkers infected with the coronavirus came into contact with and if they too now have the disease. 

However Mayor de Blasio said the city cannot get enough tests fast enough to keep up. 

The city has 1,000 tests currently, but with fast-growing numbers, de Blasio said the city urgently needs more. 

‘Each day we may tell you something new about how this disease.

‘The community spread issue, we are seeking guidance from WHO and CDC, now that it’s clearly established as a phenomenon here,’ he said. 

He went on to say that the ‘big picture’ is that 80 percent of people who have become infected have recovered. 

‘We need the ability to test and many people as possible as quickly as possible, we cannot do that without help from the federal government.

‘We do not have the physical capacity we need. We need the FDA to speed up the approval of the test developed by private companies. We have to maximize our ability to do what we need to do,’ he said. 

‘The last 48 hours are sobering. 

‘Community spread is an entirely different ball game.

‘I don’t want people to assume, I don’t want people to overreact because this is going to be a day to day, hour by hour thing. 

‘Community spread is different. It makes it a lot harder for us to control the situation. 

‘We’re all very sober right now about what tomorrow could bring or the day after that, he said.   

Everything you need to know about coronavirus

By Natalie Rahhal, Acting US Health Editor for DailyMail.com  

HOW DANGEROUS IS CORONAVIRUS?

About 14 percent of people who contract the Covid-19 coronavirus are taken to hospital – with severe symptoms including breathing problems and pneumonia. About 5 per cent need intensive care.

But the majority who get the virus suffer nothing more than a cough and may never know they are infected.

So far, some 51,000 people around the world have already recovered from coronavirus – and that just includes the numbers who received a diagnosis. 

HOW MANY PEOPLE DIE?

Officially, the death rate so far has been just over three percent. But experts believe the true mortality rate is probably between one and two percent. This is because most mild cases have not been picked up by doctors or reflected in the official numbers – so the death rate is inflated. 

HOW DOES THIS COMPARE WITH OTHER DISEASES?

Seasonal flu kills roughly 0.1 percent of people. So Covid-19 is between 10 and 20 times more fatal.

But it is far less dangerous than SARS – the virus that ripped across China in 2003 – which killed 10 percent of patients.

BUT DOESN’T CORONAVIRUS SPREAD MORE EASILY?

Yes, but not dramatically. The best estimates suggest every person with Covid-19 passes it on to 2.6 people, on average. For flu that number is 1.5. 

CAN IT BE SPREAD WITHOUT SYMPTOMS?

Initially scientists feared carriers who had no symptoms could pass it on. That is now in doubt.

What is likely, however, is those who have mild symptoms are putting it down to a cold and going about their normal lives – which puts others at risk.

HOW LONG IS IT BEFORE SYMPTOMS APPEAR?

Again, unclear. Initially scientists said this could take up to two weeks.

But recent evidence suggests the incubation period could be as long as a month – particularly among children.

The average, however, is much shorter. A Chinese study said the average period of symptom onset was 5.4 days for adults and 6.5 for children. 

WHO IS AT RISK?

The virus can affect anyone – with a study of the first 41 infected people revealing two thirds did not suffer from any pre-existing condition. But the middle-aged are most likely to get it – 78 percent of those infected in China have been aged 30 to 69.

WHAT ABOUT THE OLD?

Only 3 percent of people infected so far have been over 80 – but if they get it they are more vulnerable. Analysis of 72,000 cases in China suggests for over-80s the death rate is 15 percent. For those in their 70s the death rate is 8 percent and for those in their 60s, 4 percent.

WHO ELSE IS VULNERABLE?

Those with other conditions – such as diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and kidney problems – are likely to suffer severe complications if they become infected.

WHAT ABOUT CHILDREN?

Children seem to be low-risk. Less than 1 percent of the Chinese cases have been under the age of ten – and if children do get the virus it’s often a mild form.

They do, however, retain the virus for longer than adults.

A study last week found the virus was still present in the stools of some children for a month after they contracted it.

DOES GENDER MATTER?

Men are marginally more likely to get the virus than women. It is not clear why this is.

HOW DO DOCTORS TEST FOR COVID-19?

Anyone who has symptoms –particularly if they have travelled to an at-risk area – are told to call ahead to their health care provider, local emergency department or clinics.

This way, health care providers can be prepared, wearing masks, gloves and other personal protective equipment when they meet the possible patient and escort them to isolated areas of the facility.

They are tested using a cheek swab which is sent off for analysis at one of 12 Public Health England labs, a process that takes between 24 and 48 hours. Any positive test is double-checked at the main PHE lab in Colindale.

WHAT TREATMENT DO PATIENTS GET?

There is little doctors can do to tackle the virus, but they can treat the symptoms – such as fever and respiratory problems. Antivirals and antibiotics are also used, mainly to keep secondary problems at bay.

In the most serious cases patients are put on life-support equipment.

There are several clinical trials for potential coronavirus treatments ongoing worldwide, including one in Nebraska, where at least 13 patients are in quarantine, including two in biocontainment units. 

WHAT ABOUT A VACCINE?

Even though the Wuhan virus appeared only a few weeks ago, 20 teams around the world are already manufacturing vaccines.

Chinese authorities provided the DNA code for the virus early on in the outbreak, enabling scientists to get to work straight away.

At least 30 companies and research institutions in the US are racing to make a vaccine.

Last week, one of these companies, Moderna, shipped its candidate vaccine to the US, signalling the shot was ready to begin clinical trials.

Even so, US health authorities say it will likely be upwards of a year before a vaccine is actually ready.

 

Link hienalouca.com

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