Famous 1896 video remastered into a 4K masterpiece at 60FPS using AI

Artificial intelligence (AI) has been used to create a stunning 4K version of the classic black and white film L’Arrivée d’un train en gare de La Ciotat.

The 45-second clip is famed for the urban legend — which is now thought to be false — that cinema-goers fled the theatre when they saw the film for the first time for fear the train would burst through the screen.

YouTuber Denis Shiryaev posted the remastered video on his site which is now in 4K quality at 60 frames per second.  

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The 45-second clip of the chugging steam train is famed for the urban legend ¿ which is now thought to be false ¿ that cinema-goers fled the theatre in fear the train would come through the screen

The 45-second clip of the chugging steam train is famed for the urban legend ¿ which is now thought to be false ¿ that cinema-goers fled the theatre in fear the train would come through the screen

The 45-second clip of the chugging steam train is famed for the urban legend — which is now thought to be false — that cinema-goers fled the theatre in fear the train would come through the screen

The upscaled and source videos look very different when compared side-by-side (pictured). the higher quality of the AI-enhanced clip is clear in this image of passengers. On the left a man is seen in crisp definition whereas the right shows the rougher appearance of the 125 year old video

The upscaled and source videos look very different when compared side-by-side (pictured). the higher quality of the AI-enhanced clip is clear in this image of passengers. On the left a man is seen in crisp definition whereas the right shows the rougher appearance of the 125 year old video

The upscaled and source videos look very different when compared side-by-side (pictured). the higher quality of the AI-enhanced clip is clear in this image of passengers. On the left a man is seen in crisp definition whereas the right shows the rougher appearance of the 125 year old video 

This ‘upscaled’ footage was created using neural network-powered algorithms such as Topaz Labs’ Gigapixel AI and DAIN. 

They are freely available online and Gigapixel AI uses an algorithm which ‘analyses the image and recognises details and structures and “completes” the image’ according to its website. 

It clears up and sharpens the images even if they have been enlarged and become blurry. 

DAIN is the technique responsible for the enhanced frame rate as it inserts frames into an existing video clip in a similar way to 4K video smoothing. 

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The remastered video isn't perfect, a range of visual artefacts can be seen in the objects on the clip but as a whole it is far superior. Glitches can be seen as the people wander towards the camera and the train has an unusual wave appearance

The remastered video isn't perfect, a range of visual artefacts can be seen in the objects on the clip but as a whole it is far superior. Glitches can be seen as the people wander towards the camera and the train has an unusual wave appearance

The remastered video isn’t perfect, a range of visual artefacts can be seen in the objects on the clip but as a whole it is far superior. Glitches can be seen as the people wander towards the camera and the train has an unusual wave appearance

The image is, as a result, much more modern in its appearance compared to the original version from 1895. 

It isn’t perfect – a range of visual artefacts can be seen in the objects on the clip. 

Glitches can be seen as the people wander towards the camera and the train has an unusual wave appearance. 

These are easily identifiable on bigger screens but the almost seamless result is still very impressive. 

The video is still black and white, but it could be colourised if another neural network was employed  

WHAT IS L’ARRIVEE D’UN TRAIN EN GARE DE LA CIOTAT 

Translated from french, it means ‘Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat’.

It was filmed by Louis Lumière, one of the famous Lumière brothers.

He was a pioneer of motion pictures and the equipment used to capture moving images on film.

The short 45-second clip is unassuming, it features a slow chugging steam train rolling into a train station, 

however, its fame comes from various urban legends surrounding its screening in a movie theatre. 

The 19th century cinema viewers were said to be so staggered and scared by the moving images they fled the theatre in fear. 

it was reported they believed the train would bust through the screen and into the room they were sat in 

Experts now believe this to be false and it is an inflated tale enhanced over time and now etched into folklore.  

Link hienalouca.com

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