The Crown leaves viewers furious as the Queen is shown faking tears at the Aberfan coal-tip tragedy

The Crown was last night blasted for depicting the Queen being reluctant to visit victims of the Aberfan coal-tip tragedy – then faking tears when she got there.

Her Majesty visited the village eight days after the devastating avalanche of slurry killed 144 people, mostly children, in 1966. 

In the third series of the show the Queen is shown repeatedly rebuffing Prime Minister Harold Wilson’s suggestion that she meet grieving relatives before finally relenting.

The Crown was last night blasted for depicting the Queen (played by Olivia Colman) being reluctant to visit victims of the Aberfan coal-tip tragedy – then faking tears when she got there

The Crown was last night blasted for depicting the Queen (played by Olivia Colman) being reluctant to visit victims of the Aberfan coal-tip tragedy – then faking tears when she got there

Her Majesty visited the village eight days after the devastating avalanche of slurry killed 144 people, mostly children, in 1966

Her Majesty visited the village eight days after the devastating avalanche of slurry killed 144 people, mostly children, in 1966

The Crown was last night blasted for depicting the Queen (played by Olivia Colman, left) being reluctant to visit victims of the Aberfan coal-tip tragedy – then faking tears when she got there. Her Majesty visited the village eight days after the devastating avalanche of slurry killed 144 people, mostly children, in 1966 (right)

In the third series of the show the Queen is shown repeatedly rebuffing Prime Minister Harold Wilson’s suggestion that she meet grieving relatives before finally relenting. Pictured: Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip visiting Aberfan in south Wales in 1966

In the third series of the show the Queen is shown repeatedly rebuffing Prime Minister Harold Wilson’s suggestion that she meet grieving relatives before finally relenting. Pictured: Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip visiting Aberfan in south Wales in 1966

In the third series of the show the Queen is shown repeatedly rebuffing Prime Minister Harold Wilson’s suggestion that she meet grieving relatives before finally relenting. Pictured: Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip visiting Aberfan in south Wales in 1966

In the series, the Queen is shown dabbing her eye after talking to the bereaved. She later says: ‘I dabbed a bone-dry eye and by some miracle no one noticed'

In the series, the Queen is shown dabbing her eye after talking to the bereaved. She later says: ‘I dabbed a bone-dry eye and by some miracle no one noticed'

In the series, the Queen is shown dabbing her eye after talking to the bereaved. She later says: ‘I dabbed a bone-dry eye and by some miracle no one noticed’ 

En route to Wales, an aide tells the Monarch, as played by Olivia Colman: ‘You may wish to consider this is Wales, not England. A display of emotion would not just be considered appropriate, it’s expected.’

The Queen is shown dabbing her eye after talking to the bereaved. She later says: ‘I dabbed a bone-dry eye and by some miracle no one noticed.’

Last night, Joe Haines, Wilson’s press secretary, slammed this version of events as ‘absolute nonsense’ and added that the Queen was capable of showing emotion, saying: ‘Anyone who saw her at The Cenotaph knows that.’

A publicist for The Crown said: ‘We show a Monarch who is naturally restrained, while advisers question her stoicism. We make it clear she has a strong bond with Aberfan.’

Last night, Joe Haines, Wilson’s press secretary, slammed this version of events as ‘absolute nonsense’ and added that the Queen was capable of showing emotion, saying: ‘Anyone who saw her at The Cenotaph knows that.’ Pictured: The Queen in 1966

Last night, Joe Haines, Wilson’s press secretary, slammed this version of events as ‘absolute nonsense’ and added that the Queen was capable of showing emotion, saying: ‘Anyone who saw her at The Cenotaph knows that.’ Pictured: The Queen in 1966

Last night, Joe Haines, Wilson’s press secretary, slammed this version of events as ‘absolute nonsense’ and added that the Queen was capable of showing emotion, saying: ‘Anyone who saw her at The Cenotaph knows that.’ Pictured: The Queen in 1966

Link hienalouca.com

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