New U.S. Census finds 22.1 million American residents are non-citizens

New U.S. Census data confirms America is undergoing the largest foreign-born ethnic shift its had in more than a century as the country grapples with how to handle its rapidly-changing demographics.

Census bureau researchers on Thursday unveiled estimates from their annual American Community Survey. The statistics revealed a record 13.7 percent of nation’s 2018 population – nearly 44.7 million people – was born in another country.

That’s the highest number of foreign-born citizens since 1910, according to Bloomberg

An estimated 22 million of those foreign-born residents said they were ‘not a U.S. citizen,’ the data showed.

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The U.S. Census Bureau released estimates from its annual American Community Survey on Thursday

The U.S. Census Bureau released estimates from its annual American Community Survey on Thursday

The U.S. Census Bureau released estimates from its annual American Community Survey on Thursday

Researchers found a record 13.7 percent of the 2018 U.S. population – about 44.7 million people – were born in another country. That’s the most foreign-born American residents counted in one year since 1910

The Trump administration proposed enacting the measure in 2018, arguing it was 'necessary for the Department of Justice to protect voters.' The president shifted his strategy in July after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the U.S. Department of Commerce had failed to provide an adequate reason for adding the citizenship question to the census

The Trump administration proposed enacting the measure in 2018, arguing it was 'necessary for the Department of Justice to protect voters.' The president shifted his strategy in July after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the U.S. Department of Commerce had failed to provide an adequate reason for adding the citizenship question to the census

The Trump administration proposed enacting the measure in 2018, arguing it was ‘necessary for the Department of Justice to protect voters.’ The president shifted his strategy in July after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the U.S. Department of Commerce had failed to provide an adequate reason for adding the citizenship question to the census

About one out of every 20 U.S. residents were foreign born in 1960 and 1970. Today’s foreign-born resident rate has surged to about one in seven in California, Texas, Florida, and New York – the nation’s largest states – where the foreign born population is 15 percent higher than it is elsewhere in America.

The illuminating figures have emerged in the middle of a heated policy debate over whether a citizenship question should be added to the decennial U.S. Census.

The Trump administration proposed enacting the measure in 2018, arguing it was ‘necessary for the Department of Justice to protect voters,’ the New Yorker reported.

The president shifted his strategy in July after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the U.S. Department of Commerce had failed to provide an adequate reason for adding the citizenship question to the census. 

In response, Trump issued an executive order on July 11 calling on the federal agencies use current databases and documents to gather citizenship data, according to Politico.

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