‘Chrisley Knows Best’ stars Todd Chrisley and wife Julie could face 30 years in prison for fraud

‘Chrisley Knows Best’ reality stars Todd and Julie Chrisley have been indicted by a federal grand jury in Atlanta, Georgia for bank fraud and tax evasion.

If found guilty, Todd, 51, and wife Julie, 48 could face up to 30 years in prison, according to federal guidelines. 

The couple, along with their Roswell, Georgia-based accountant Peter Tarantino, 56,  were named as defendants in papers filed this afternoon with the US District Court of Northern Georgia.

In the 12-count indictment, the Chrisleys are accused of bank fraud, conspiracy to commit bank fraud, wire fraud conspiracy and tax evasion.

Tarantino is accused with them of conspiracy to defraud the United States and two counts of aiding the filing of a false tax return.

Todd Chrisley, 51, his wife Julie, 48, face 12-counts of fraud and tax evasion including faking financial documents to obtain million dollars in loans

Todd Chrisley, 51, his wife Julie, 48, face 12-counts of fraud and tax evasion including faking financial documents to obtain million dollars in loans

Todd Chrisley, 51, his wife Julie, 48, face 12-counts of fraud and tax evasion including faking financial documents to obtain million dollars in loans

 

If convicted Todd and Julie could face up to 30 years in prison, according to federal guidelines

If convicted Todd and Julie could face up to 30 years in prison, according to federal guidelines

If convicted Todd and Julie could face up to 30 years in prison, according to federal guidelines

The main evidence comes from emails Todd Chrisley sent to a business partner in his Georgia-based company Chrisley Asset Management (CAM) asking to falsify financial documents.

Between 2008 and 2012, CAM managed and sold foreclosed properties.

The lawsuit alleges Chrisley tricked banks into giving him and his wife large loans by convincing them they were personally worth millions.    

It states the Chrisleys and their unidentified business partner, only named in papers as Co-conspirator A ‘conspired to submit false materials, such as fabricated bank statements and false personal financial statements, to financial institutions to obtain millions of dollars in loans, much of which they used for their own personal benefit.’

A grand jury at the US District Court for the Northern District of Georgia Atlanta Division also accuses their accountant Peter Tarantino of falsifying tax returns

A grand jury at the US District Court for the Northern District of Georgia Atlanta Division also accuses their accountant Peter Tarantino of falsifying tax returns

A grand jury at the US District Court for the Northern District of Georgia Atlanta Division also accuses their accountant Peter Tarantino of falsifying tax returns

The lawsuit gave an example, from November 5, 2007, how the trio tricked a bank into believing the Chrisleys had $4 million in an account with financial institution Merrill Lynch to obtain a loan. 

The suit states, ‘When the bank employee requested account statements, Co-conspirator A sent Todd Chrisley and Julie Chrisley a fabricated bank statement showing that Todd and Julie Chrisley had $776,509.52 on deposit at Merrill Lynch.

‘In response, Todd Chrisley told Co-conspirator A, ‘you are a f****** genious [sic]!!! Just make it show 4 mil+.’

In reality, the lawsuit claims, the Chrisleys did not set up a Merrill Lynch account until 2008 and the account never had more than $17,000 in it.

In 2008, a bank demanded updated financial information from the Chrisleys. Co-conspirator A told Todd they would need help in putting the financial details together.

The lawsuit states Todd wrote to co-Conspirator A ‘if you do not know how to do this then find a crooked accountant to do it. Ask [redacted] who her guy uses to do his crooked s***.’  

The lawsuit gave an example, from November 5, 2007, how the trio tricked a bank into believing the Chrisleys had $4 million in an account with financial institution Merrill Lynch to obtain a loan. In reality, the lawsuit claims, the Chrisleys did not set up a Merrill Lynch account until 2008 and the account never had more than $17,000 in it

The lawsuit gave an example, from November 5, 2007, how the trio tricked a bank into believing the Chrisleys had $4 million in an account with financial institution Merrill Lynch to obtain a loan. In reality, the lawsuit claims, the Chrisleys did not set up a Merrill Lynch account until 2008 and the account never had more than $17,000 in it

The lawsuit gave an example, from November 5, 2007, how the trio tricked a bank into believing the Chrisleys had $4 million in an account with financial institution Merrill Lynch to obtain a loan. In reality, the lawsuit claims, the Chrisleys did not set up a Merrill Lynch account until 2008 and the account never had more than $17,000 in it

In 2008, a bank demanded updated financial information from the Chrisleys. Co-conspirator A told Todd they would need help in putting the financial details together. The lawsuit states Todd wrote to co-Conspirator A 'if you do not know how to do this then find a crooked accountant to do it. Ask [redacted] who her guy uses to do his crooked s***'

In 2008, a bank demanded updated financial information from the Chrisleys. Co-conspirator A told Todd they would need help in putting the financial details together. The lawsuit states Todd wrote to co-Conspirator A 'if you do not know how to do this then find a crooked accountant to do it. Ask [redacted] who her guy uses to do his crooked s***'

In 2008, a bank demanded updated financial information from the Chrisleys. Co-conspirator A told Todd they would need help in putting the financial details together. The lawsuit states Todd wrote to co-Conspirator A ‘if you do not know how to do this then find a crooked accountant to do it. Ask [redacted] who her guy uses to do his crooked s***’

In 2014, the Chrisleys shot to fame with ‘Chrisley Knows Best’ on the USA Network and set up a company, 7C’s Productions, where earnings from the show would be deposited.

The show, now in its seventh season, follows the tight-knit, boisterous Chrisley family living in the Nashville area.

Much of the series emphasizes Todd Chrisley’s obsessive yet comedic efforts to keep tabs on three of his children, two of whom are in their 20s, and his mother.

The suit alleges, ‘over the years, various entertainment and production companies paid millions of dollars to Todd and Julie Chrisley, the vast majority of which was deposited into 7C’s Productions bank accounts’.

However, despite their new wealth, prosecutors claim accountant Tarantino told the IRS Todd did not have enough money to pay an outstanding 2009 tax bill.

The lawsuit states, ‘In June 2017 alone, the entertainment and production companies wired over $300,000 into a 7C’s Production bank account.

‘That same month, Todd and Julie Chrisley spent over $7,000 at an electronics store, over $2,000 at a luxury retail store, and thousands of dollars at department and clothing stores.

‘However, three months earlier in March 2017, Tarantino had told an IRS Revenue Officer that Todd Chrisley did not have sufficient resources to pay his 2009 tax liability.’

The lawsuit also points out the Chrisleys failed to file timely federal tax returns or pay income taxes for the 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 tax years.

Allan Mayer, a representative for the Chrisleys, said in an email Tuesday afternoon that his clients’ lawyers hadn’t seen the indictment and couldn’t comment.

Chrisley, in an online post released Monday, a day before the indictment was announced, denied any wrongdoing.

Link hienalouca.com

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