Australian businessman slammed for telling Hong Kong airport protesters off flight cancellations

An Australian businessman has been condemned for telling Hong Kong airport protesters the Chinese police should have been even more heavy-handed with them.

A journalist with the American CNN pay-TV channel videoed the stranded traveller, known only as Paul, remonstrating with anti-government demonstrators as flights to and from Australia were cancelled at one of the world’s busiest airports.

‘The Hong Kong police should actually help restrain … they’ve been very restrained at the moment,’ he said to a crowd of youths on Tuesday.

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An Australian businessman has been condemned for telling Hong Kong airport protesters the Chinese police should have been even more heavy-handed with them

An Australian businessman has been condemned for telling Hong Kong airport protesters the Chinese police should have been even more heavy-handed with them

An Australian businessman has been condemned for telling Hong Kong airport protesters the Chinese police should have been even more heavy-handed with them

‘They should actually bring your people to actual law and order.’

A demonstrator had told Paul he was ‘angry because your flight is cancelled’, hours before Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam warned the city was in danger of going ‘down a path of no return’.

Police, believed to be from the Chinese mainland, have been recorded by Australian and foreign media outlets firing rubber bullets and tear gas canisters at protesters and journalists, even ones wearing ‘press’ vests.

The police presence has escalated, with protests first erupting in late March after Ms Lam put forward a hated bill allowing local residents charged with crimes to be extradited to mainland China for trial from the major financial hub.

In the wake of this, Twitter has erupted in anger, with Australians accusing the businessman of arrogance.

‘White privilege Australia style,’ said Nathaniel Parkinson, who describes himself as a ‘proud liberal’. 

CNN producer James Griffiths tweeted the video and quoted his colleague Helen Regan, who discovered the Australian tourist Paul lived in southern China’s Guangdong province. 

Police, believed to be from the Chinese mainland, have been recorded by Australian and foreign media outlets firing rubber bullets and tear gas canisters at protesters and journalists, even ones wearing 'press' vests (pictured are Hong Kong police on August 10)

Police, believed to be from the Chinese mainland, have been recorded by Australian and foreign media outlets firing rubber bullets and tear gas canisters at protesters and journalists, even ones wearing 'press' vests (pictured are Hong Kong police on August 10)

Police, believed to be from the Chinese mainland, have been recorded by Australian and foreign media outlets firing rubber bullets and tear gas canisters at protesters and journalists, even ones wearing ‘press’ vests (pictured are Hong Kong police on August 10)

 

The police presence has escalated, with protests first erupting in late March after Hong Kong authorities put forward a hated bill allowing local residents charged with crimes to be extradited to mainland China

The police presence has escalated, with protests first erupting in late March after Hong Kong authorities put forward a hated bill allowing local residents charged with crimes to be extradited to mainland China

The police presence has escalated, with protests first erupting in late March after Hong Kong authorities put forward a hated bill allowing local residents charged with crimes to be extradited to mainland China

In an interview with her, Paul said he supported the Chinese government.

‘They should learn their place,’ he told CNN.

‘What right do these people think they have to disrupt a city that is part of China?

‘Why would they think they have a right to disrupt flying in and out of Hong Kong – disrupting business and the operations of Hong Kong?’

More tweets focused on the Australian’s skin colour than the conduct of the Chinese communist government, who took control of Hong Kong from the British in 1997. 

He wasn’t the only one stranded as Qantas cancelled three flights to Australia on Monday night.

Three Hong Kong-bound services that were due to leave on Tuesday were also cancelled: QF97 out of Brisbane, QF29 out of Melbourne and QF127 out of Sydney.

Two Virgin Australia flights due to leave Australia on Monday night were also cancelled. 

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam has warned the city was in danger of going 'down a path of no return'

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam has warned the city was in danger of going 'down a path of no return'

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam has warned the city was in danger of going ‘down a path of no return’

Anyone planning to travel between Australia and Hong Kong has been urged to check with their airline.

The Australian government’s Smartraveller website continues to warn people to exercise a high degree of caution while in Hong Kong.

‘Flash mob protests and random attacks on protesters have become less predictable and are expected to continue,’ it said.

‘Tourist and residential areas have been affected. There is a high risk of violent confrontation between protesters and police, or criminally-linked individuals.’

Ms Lam on Tuesday warned Hong Kong was on the verge of becoming a lawless society.

‘Violence, no matter if it’s using violence or condoning violence, will push Hong Kong down a path of no return, will plunge Hong Kong society into a very worrying and dangerous situation,’ she told reporters. 

Link hienalouca.com

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