Publisher drops author’s book after she calls for a Metro rail worker eating on a train to be fired

A publishing house has announced that it will be dropping an author’s book from its distribution after she took to Twitter on Friday to blast a black Metro rail worker for eating on the train. 

Natasha Tynes, author of novel ‘They Call Me Wyatt’, shared her annoyance with a black woman dressed in a Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority uniform was eating on the train during her commute. 

‘When you’re on your morning commute & see @wmata employee in UNIFORM eating on the train,’ she said in the now deleted post, along with a photo of the employee. 

Natasha Tynes shared her annoyance with a black woman dressed in a Washington MTA uniform was eating on the train during her commute on Friday

Natasha Tynes shared her annoyance with a black woman dressed in a Washington MTA uniform was eating on the train during her commute on Friday

Natasha Tynes shared her annoyance with a black woman dressed in a Washington MTA uniform was eating on the train during her commute on Friday

‘I thought we were not allowed to eat on the train,’ she continued. ‘This is unacceptable. Hope @wmata responds. When I asked the employee about this, her response was ‘worry about yourself.’ @unsuckdcmetro’

MTA responded to Tynes’ post and asked her to inform them where the train was headed. 

‘Thank you for catching this and helping us to make sure all Metro employees are held accountable,’ they added. 

The author informed them that the train was headed to Glenmont on the Red Line at approximately 9am.   

MTA responded to Tynes' post and asked her to inform them where the train was headed

MTA responded to Tynes' post and asked her to inform them where the train was headed

MTA responded to Tynes’ post and asked her to inform them where the train was headed

Twitter soon became inundated with vicious critiques of the author’s post, with many calling her out for going after a black woman who was minding her own business and not bothering anyone. 

‘Funny that your pinned tweet is about being a ‘minority’ writer and using that as a basis to sell your book yet you saw another minority person eating and you wanted to ruin their livelihood,’ actress Kelechi Okafor asserted. ‘You’re a trash individual.’

The sentiment was shared by journalist Ernest Owens, who added: ”People of color’ like Natasha Tynes is the reason why I make it a point to directly name Black people within the spectrum, because there is anti-Blackness within people of color in totality. POC solidarity is often upheld by Black people, but not maintained by others within.’

‘Wow @NatashaTynes, you’re a fucking snitch,’ stated a professor Chanda Prescod-Weinstein.

One user reworked Tynes’ book to read: ‘They Called Me Snitch.’ 

Twitter soon became inundated with vicious critiques of the author's post, with many calling her out for going after a black woman who was minding her own business and not bothering anyone

Twitter soon became inundated with vicious critiques of the author's post, with many calling her out for going after a black woman who was minding her own business and not bothering anyone

Twitter soon became inundated with vicious critiques of the author’s post, with many calling her out for going after a black woman who was minding her own business and not bothering anyone

 Tyne, who has since made her tweets protected, took to her Twitter to offer an apology. It was lackluster at best. 

‘I apologize for a tweet I posted earlier today, which I have since deleted. I am truly sorry,’ she said.

But the damage had already been done, as PR/marketing firm Rare Bird shared a statement on Twitter voicing their disdain with the author’s actions. 

‘Black women face a constant barrage of this kind of inappropriate behavior directed toward them and a constant policing of their bodies,’ Rare Bird stated in a statement on Friday.

Tyne, who has since made her tweets protected, took to her Twitter to offer an apology. It was lackluster at best

Tyne, who has since made her tweets protected, took to her Twitter to offer an apology. It was lackluster at best

Tyne, who has since made her tweets protected, took to her Twitter to offer an apology. It was lackluster at best

‘We think this is unacceptable and have no desire to be involved with anyone who thinks it’s acceptable to jeopardize a person’s safety and employment in this way. 

‘We are currently taking appropriate actions to cancel Ms. Tynes’ novel, They Call Me Wyatt, within our distribution network, and are strongly urging Tynes’ publisher, California Coldblood, to consider other appropriate actions.’

California Coldblood soon followed suit and posted their own statement, that said: ‘We do not condone her actions and hope Natasha learns from this experience that black women feel the effects of systematic racism the most and that we have to be allies, not oppressors.

‘As for the book’s publication, we are working with our distributor to take appropriate next steps.’ 

But the damage had already been done, as PR/marketing firm Rare Bird shared a statement on Twitter voicing their disdain with the author's actions

But the damage had already been done, as PR/marketing firm Rare Bird shared a statement on Twitter voicing their disdain with the author's actions

But the damage had already been done, as PR/marketing firm Rare Bird shared a statement on Twitter voicing their disdain with the author’s actions

California Coldblood - her publisher - soon followed suit and posted their own statement condemning her actions

California Coldblood - her publisher - soon followed suit and posted their own statement condemning her actions

California Coldblood – her publisher – soon followed suit and posted their own statement condemning her actions

Folks felt that the news was adequate considering Tyne had attempted to impact the woman’s job.

‘God is real….leave people TF alone @NatashaTynes,’ declared one user.

‘Now you over there looking ashy, publisher dropped you, money bout to be funny, and weird. All because you allowed your proximity to whiteness make you think that being an a*****e is ok. Let that simmer in your spirit.’

‘They Call Me Wyatt’ is expected to be released on June 11. 

Folks felt that the news was adequate considering Tyne had attempted to impact the woman's job

Folks felt that the news was adequate considering Tyne had attempted to impact the woman's job

Folks felt that the news was adequate considering Tyne had attempted to impact the woman’s job

'They Call Me Wyatt' is expected to be released on June 11

'They Call Me Wyatt' is expected to be released on June 11

‘They Call Me Wyatt’ is expected to be released on June 11

Link hienalouca.com

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