Google’s 3,600 staff in the UK earned an average of £226,000 EACH in bumper payout last year 

Google‘s employees in the UK were paid an average of £226,000 each last year, it has emerged.  

The web giant paid out almost £350million in bonuses from a company stock scheme after enjoying a surge in revenue.

More than 3,600 staff in management, marketing and research and development are said to have benefited from the bumper payouts. 

The tech firm also paid almost £70million in corporation tax, according to the figures seen by the Guardian.  

Google employees in the UK were paid an average of £226,000 last year thanks to a bumper stock scheme payout, it has emerged

Google employees in the UK were paid an average of £226,000 last year thanks to a bumper stock scheme payout, it has emerged

Google employees in the UK were paid an average of £226,000 last year thanks to a bumper stock scheme payout, it has emerged 

The pot of money to be paid out from the stock scheme surged by more than 50 per cent from £219million to £342million thanks to a rising share price and strong financial performance, it is reported. 

The company said it was ‘investing significantly in the UK’ including a new 11-storey building in King’s Cross. 

The building will create a Google office with the potential to house 7,000 employees, the company has said. 

Google’s profits are reported to have risen by 23 per cent to £246million, according to the company’s latest financial documents. 

The corporation tax figure, at £66.8million last year, is said to be almost £20million higher than in the previous 12 months. 

Web titans such as Google, Facebook and Amazon have faced ongoing scrutiny over their efforts to reduce their tax bills. 

Google (stock photo) paid out almost £350million in bonuses from a company stock scheme to its UK staff after enjoying a surge in revenue

Google (stock photo) paid out almost £350million in bonuses from a company stock scheme to its UK staff after enjoying a surge in revenue

Google (stock photo) paid out almost £350million in bonuses from a company stock scheme to its UK staff after enjoying a surge in revenue

Google’s European headquarters are in Dublin where corporate taxes are lower than in the UK.  

In 2016 the Government came to an agreement with the internet giant which saw £130 million paid in back taxes covering the previous decade. 

In his October Budget last year, Philip Hammond unveiled a ‘digital services tax’ on large online firms that will take effect from April 2020.

Under the plans, social media platforms, search engines and online marketplaces will pay a two per cent tax on the revenues they earn which are linked to UK users.

The Chancellor said he hoped to raise more than £400million a year as a result of the new tax. 

In the U.S. Google’s parent company Alphabet paid 12.3 per cent in the first three quarters of 2018, a large reduction from the previous year. 

Meanwhile Facebook’s UK tax bill rose to £15.8 million last year on record revenues of £1.3 billion.  

Link hienalouca.com

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