Northern lights could appear over New York and other US states this weekend

New Yorkers and a handful of other Americans may not have to travel to the remote glaciers of Greenland or Iceland to catch a glimpse of one of the world’s most fascinating phenomenons this weekend – it may be coming to them instead.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a geomagnetic storm may make the Aurora Borealis visible over Upstate New York this weekend, and may even extend to other parts of Northern America.

Such regions are projected to include New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Montana, Northern Idaho and Washington state.

NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) signaled the beginning of the geomagnetic storm on Friday, but the Northern Lights are only likely to be visible from Saturday night.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a geomagnetic storm may make the Aurora Borealis visible this weekend

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a geomagnetic storm may make the Aurora Borealis visible this weekend

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a geomagnetic storm may make the Aurora Borealis visible this weekend

NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) signaled the beginning of the geomagnetic storm on Friday, but the Northern Lights are only likely to be visible from Saturday night

NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) signaled the beginning of the geomagnetic storm on Friday, but the Northern Lights are only likely to be visible from Saturday night

NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) signaled the beginning of the geomagnetic storm on Friday, but the Northern Lights are only likely to be visible from Saturday night 

In the northern-most parts of the US, night-sky gazers will have the greatest chance of catching a glimpse of natural light display at around 10.55pm, a NOAA forecast predicts.

This isn’t the first time a sighting of the Aurora has been possible over the US. In 2017, New York and several states in the Upper Midwest witnessed a shimmering hue of green and purple lighting up the sky.

In 2011, the Northern Lights were even spotted as far down south as Alabama.

However, as various weather conditions have to align perfectly for the phenomenon to appear, a sighting is far from guaranteed.

‘I would not drive out of my way for this particular event,’ said Terry Onsager, a physicist at NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center to The New York Times.

The reason, Onsanger goes on to reveal, is that there is no guarantee the geomagnetic storm will even hit earth – particularly at the optimum viewing hours, just before midnight.

In the northern-most parts of the US, night-sky gazers will have the greatest chance of catching a glimpse of natural light display at around 10:55pm (pictured: the Northern Lights over Upstate New York, in June 2015)

In the northern-most parts of the US, night-sky gazers will have the greatest chance of catching a glimpse of natural light display at around 10:55pm (pictured: the Northern Lights over Upstate New York, in June 2015)

In the northern-most parts of the US, night-sky gazers will have the greatest chance of catching a glimpse of natural light display at around 10:55pm (pictured: the Northern Lights over Upstate New York, in June 2015)

Projected regions to be treated to a sighting include New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota (pictured in 2003), Montana, Northern Idaho and Washington state

Projected regions to be treated to a sighting include New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota (pictured in 2003), Montana, Northern Idaho and Washington state

Projected regions to be treated to a sighting include New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota (pictured in 2003), Montana, Northern Idaho and Washington state

To see the Aurora Borealis, a near-full moon and clear, dark sky are mandatory requirements (pictured Tennessee in 2011)

To see the Aurora Borealis, a near-full moon and clear, dark sky are mandatory requirements (pictured Tennessee in 2011)

To see the Aurora Borealis, a near-full moon and clear, dark sky are mandatory requirements (pictured Tennessee in 2011)

He said a chunk of the sun’s atmosphere began hurtling towards Earth this week, which is expected to collide with our planet’s magnetic field on Saturday.

That collision would produce the glow of the Northern Lights, but it may have already taken place during the day, as the impact could have occurred as early as 11am, NOAA say.

Cloud coverage could also play a part, as many of the potential viewing locations listed by NOAA currently foretasted for a cloudy evening.

To see the Aurora Borealis, a near-full moon and clear, dark sky are mandatory requirements.

NOAA officials advise checking your area’s weather forecast prior to hatching any observation plans. But it could be good news for residents of Syracuse, New York, where clear skies are forecasted for Saturday night.

‘We have to be realistic,’ NBC meteorologist Ben Gelber told the Times. ‘We have to dampen expectations, to be honest.

‘[But] There’s always a remote chance. ‘You don’t want to close the window and figure out the sky’s breaking at the right time.’

Link hienalouca.com

(Просмотров всего: 40 Время, 1 визитов за день)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *