A woman donated her eggs to help her gay best friends have a family

A woman who donated her eggs to help her gay best friends have twins, which were carried by one of their sisters-in-law, said it has been a ‘privilege’ to help them become fathers.

Julie Ventura, 26, from Long Beach, California, was initially surprised when her married friends, Erik McEwen, 39, and Adam McEwen, 30, asked if she would consider donating her eggs to help them conceive.

The couple, of Tucson, Arizona, thought it was important for their children to know their biological family and were certain Julie embodied qualities they hoped for in their kids – and she agreed.

Now, twins Addisen and Everest are thriving, and Julie travels to Arizona every three months to spend time with the girls and their dads.

And she’s relieved that she’s not developed maternal feelings towards the boys, after people warned her she might see them as her own children.

Julie Ventura, 26, donated her eggs to help her gay best friends Erik McEwen, 39 (right), and Adam McEwen (left), 30, have her biological twins - which were carried by one of their sisters-in-law. Twins Addisen (left) and Everest (right)

Julie Ventura, 26, donated her eggs to help her gay best friends Erik McEwen, 39 (right), and Adam McEwen (left), 30, have her biological twins - which were carried by one of their sisters-in-law. Twins Addisen (left) and Everest (right)

Julie Ventura, 26, donated her eggs to help her gay best friends Erik McEwen, 39 (right), and Adam McEwen (left), 30, have her biological twins – which were carried by one of their sisters-in-law. Twins Addisen (left) and Everest (right)

The nail technician said she was initially surprised when her married friends asked if she would consider donating her eggs to help them conceive. Above, Julie with the twins Addisen (left) and Everest (right)

The nail technician said she was initially surprised when her married friends asked if she would consider donating her eggs to help them conceive. Above, Julie with the twins Addisen (left) and Everest (right)

The nail technician said she was initially surprised when her married friends asked if she would consider donating her eggs to help them conceive. Above, Julie with the twins Addisen (left) and Everest (right)

Julie's eggs were mixed with sperm from both Erik and Adam and the embryos were placed inside the couple's surrogate Corrin McEwen, 40 -  Erik's sister-in-law. Pictured, Adam and Eric with Julie (left) and Corrin (right)

Julie's eggs were mixed with sperm from both Erik and Adam and the embryos were placed inside the couple's surrogate Corrin McEwen, 40 -  Erik's sister-in-law. Pictured, Adam and Eric with Julie (left) and Corrin (right)

Julie’s eggs were mixed with sperm from both Erik and Adam and the embryos were placed inside the couple’s surrogate Corrin McEwen, 40 –  Erik’s sister-in-law. Pictured, Adam and Eric with Julie (left) and Corrin (right)

‘It takes three or four weeks of preparation and you have to take shots three times every day,’ she explained of the process of egg donation. ‘Your ovaries get so swollen you feel like you’re pregnant and it’s very uncomfortable. I was so hormonal, I cried over every single thing.’

She added: ‘I think it was everyone else’s voice in my head rather than my own that made me a little bit worried.

‘Everyone told me I would want them as soon as I held them, that I would feel this incredible bond with them immediately, so I worried about that beforehand.’

Julie’s fears were unfounded, although she feels affection towards the babies she does not feel as though they are hers.

The couple, of Tucson, Arizona, thought it was important for their children to know their biological family and thought Julie (centre) embodied qualities they hoped for in their kids

The couple, of Tucson, Arizona, thought it was important for their children to know their biological family and thought Julie (centre) embodied qualities they hoped for in their kids

The couple, of Tucson, Arizona, thought it was important for their children to know their biological family and thought Julie (centre) embodied qualities they hoped for in their kids

‘They look a lot like me which is funny, but I also see Adam and Eric in them, although we don’t know officially which one is each of their biological dads,’ said Julie. ‘Seeing how happy this has made my friends has made it so worth it.’

Erik and Adam were relieved when Julie agreed to go through the donation process and doctors retrieved 14 viable eggs in February 2016.

Julie’s eggs were mixed with sperm from both Erik and Adam and the embryos were placed inside the couple’s surrogate Corrin McEwen, 40 – Erik’s sister-in-law.

Julie was thrilled for her friends when Corrin gave birth to 5lb 15oz Addisen and 5lb 9oz Everest in November 2017. The whole process cost the gay couple $70,000 (£54,500).

Nail technician Julie feels very lucky to have been a part of her friends’ journey to parenthood.

‘I have always known that they wanted children and I knew that Erik’s sister-in-law Corrin volunteered to be their surrogate,’ she explained. ‘I was out for lunch one day with Erik – we were having Thai – and he started talking about his sister-in-law.

‘We were talking about egg donation and he just said, ‘I think you’d be perfect for this. I was shocked. My first reaction was to say, “You want my DNA?”.

Julie was thrilled for her friends when Corrin gave birth to 5lb 15oz Addisen and 5lb 9oz Everest in November 2017. The whole process cost the gay couple $70,000

Julie was thrilled for her friends when Corrin gave birth to 5lb 15oz Addisen and 5lb 9oz Everest in November 2017. The whole process cost the gay couple $70,000

Julie was thrilled for her friends when Corrin gave birth to 5lb 15oz Addisen and 5lb 9oz Everest in November 2017. The whole process cost the gay couple $70,000

Erik and Adam were relieved when Julie agreed to go through the donation process and doctors retrieved 14 viable eggs in February 2016 . Above, Erik and Adam with Addisen and Everest

Erik and Adam were relieved when Julie agreed to go through the donation process and doctors retrieved 14 viable eggs in February 2016 . Above, Erik and Adam with Addisen and Everest

Erik and Adam were relieved when Julie agreed to go through the donation process and doctors retrieved 14 viable eggs in February 2016 . Above, Erik and Adam with Addisen and Everest

Nail technician Julie said she feels very lucky to have been a part of her friends' journey to parenthood. Julie said: 'I have always known that they wanted children and I knew that Erik's sister-in-law Corrin volunteered to be their surrogate'

Nail technician Julie said she feels very lucky to have been a part of her friends' journey to parenthood. Julie said: 'I have always known that they wanted children and I knew that Erik's sister-in-law Corrin volunteered to be their surrogate'

Nail technician Julie said she feels very lucky to have been a part of her friends’ journey to parenthood. Julie said: ‘I have always known that they wanted children and I knew that Erik’s sister-in-law Corrin volunteered to be their surrogate’

She continued: ‘At the beginning I didn’t know anything about the procedure or the process. I didn’t know how my family would react, and so I took that time to think about whether or not I could do this. The more I started to think about it, the more it made sense.’

And for Erik, a social media manager, choosing Julie out of their selection of friends was an easy decision.

‘We are so close to Julie and of all the people in our lives she seemed the perfect fit,’ agreed Adam. ‘She encompassed everything we would be proud to see in our children. We really admire her morals.’

Speaking of their birth, Erik said: 'I get emotional even thinking about it. To hold your babies in your arms is indescribable'

Speaking of their birth, Erik said: 'I get emotional even thinking about it. To hold your babies in your arms is indescribable'

Speaking of their birth, Erik said: ‘I get emotional even thinking about it. To hold your babies in your arms is indescribable’

Pictured above, Erik and Adam with Julie Everest and Addisen. Nail technician Julie described the whole journey of helping her friends as a 'privilege' 

Pictured above, Erik and Adam with Julie Everest and Addisen. Nail technician Julie described the whole journey of helping her friends as a 'privilege' 

Pictured above, Erik and Adam with Julie Everest and Addisen. Nail technician Julie described the whole journey of helping her friends as a ‘privilege’

For Julie, the process of donating her eggs was more difficult than she anticipated, and she worried about developing maternal feelings for the children - but it was all worth it. Above, Erik and Adam with their twins

For Julie, the process of donating her eggs was more difficult than she anticipated, and she worried about developing maternal feelings for the children - but it was all worth it. Above, Erik and Adam with their twins

For Julie, the process of donating her eggs was more difficult than she anticipated, and she worried about developing maternal feelings for the children – but it was all worth it. Above, Erik and Adam with their twins

The whole process has made Erik, Adam and Julie's friendship even stronger. 'We both adore Julie and her strength as a woman,' said Erik. 'To have that in our children's lives is special'

The whole process has made Erik, Adam and Julie's friendship even stronger. 'We both adore Julie and her strength as a woman,' said Erik. 'To have that in our children's lives is special'

The whole process has made Erik, Adam and Julie’s friendship even stronger. ‘We both adore Julie and her strength as a woman,’ said Erik. ‘To have that in our children’s lives is special’

Twins Everest (left) and Addisen (right), now one, are thriving and Julie travels to Arizona every three months to spend time with the girls and their dads Erik and Adam

Twins Everest (left) and Addisen (right), now one, are thriving and Julie travels to Arizona every three months to spend time with the girls and their dads Erik and Adam

Twins Everest (left) and Addisen (right), now one, are thriving and Julie travels to Arizona every three months to spend time with the girls and their dads Erik and Adam

While Julie has never been maternal, she said the twins have 'solidified' that for her. She explained. 'I love them and I have fun with them but I don't feel motherly towards them.' Pictured left to right - Erik, Adam, Addisen, Everest

While Julie has never been maternal, she said the twins have 'solidified' that for her. She explained. 'I love them and I have fun with them but I don't feel motherly towards them.' Pictured left to right - Erik, Adam, Addisen, Everest

While Julie has never been maternal, she said the twins have ‘solidified’ that for her. She explained. ‘I love them and I have fun with them but I don’t feel motherly towards them.’ Pictured left to right – Erik, Adam, Addisen, Everest

‘I’ve never been very maternal and the twins have kind of solidified that for me,’ she explained. ‘I love them and I have fun with them but I don’t feel motherly towards them. Its been a privilege.’

Describing the moment they first held their twins Addisen and Everest as ‘joyous,’ new dads Erik and Adam will always be grateful to Julie for being such a huge part of their journey.

‘I get emotional even thinking about it,’ said Erik. ‘To hold your babies in your arms is indescribable. I think as a gay man in the current society, you think that your dream may never be a possibility. It’s remarkably hard to put into words.’

‘It was such a beautiful moment to hold our girls,’ added Adam, now a stay-at-home dad. ‘Julie was there and it was so special because she is basically an extension of our family.’

And Erik is really ‘proud’ that their friendship with Julie has got stronger through this.

‘We both adore Julie and her strength as a woman,’ he said. ‘To have that in our children’s lives is special.’

Link hienalouca.com

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