Sex offender, 72, who ‘shared’ boys with one of Britain’s most notorious paedophiles is released

A sex offender who abused boys with one of Britain’s most notorious paedophiles has been released from prison – and the family of victims fear he’s living near them.

Sick Peter Norsworthy, 72, was jailed in October 2006 after he was found guilty of 13 charges including rape and indecent assault all on boys under the age of 16.

During his trial it emerged that Norsworthy would ‘share’ victims with William Goad – one of the most prolific child molesters in British legal history.

Norsworthy was jailed for 15 years for his crimes in and around Plymouth in Devon and was released in 2015 on parole before being recalled for breaching conditions.

Now vile Norsworthy has been released again – and the mother of one victim fears her son, who has brain damage, may run into the predatory pensioner.

The mother said she found out Norsworthy had been released in a letter from the Victim Contact Service, in conjunction with HM Prison and Probation Service.

ick Peter Norsworthy, 72, was jailed in October 2006 after he was found guilty of 13 charges

ick Peter Norsworthy, 72, was jailed in October 2006 after he was found guilty of 13 charges

ick Peter Norsworthy, 72, was jailed in October 2006 after he was found guilty of 13 charges

Last month she was told Norsworthy had ‘recently had his case reviewed by the Parole Board and has been granted release’.

She was informed he would be released ‘in February to an approved premises in the Southwest.’

He will be subject to two licence conditions – not to contact her son directly or indirectly and not to enter Plymouth as defined by a map supplied.

The mother, who cannot be named for legal reasons, said: ‘After seeing the map I asked if they had moved him closer – as close as Saltash.

‘The woman hesitated. I asked ‘have you moved that dirty pig closer to Plymouth?’ She couldn’t tell me.

‘Right now he is allowed right up to the Saltash bridge. Next year he will be able to walk the streets of Plymouth again – where many of his victims still live.

‘My son goes through Saltash three times a week.

‘I don’t want him [Norsworthy] nearer to my family. The parole people said that if he breaches his conditions I’m to phone the police.

‘I won’t be bothering with the police. He and Goad were abusing children for years and the police knew about it and did nothing.

‘It was only when they were forced into it, thanks to [retired Det Con Shirley Thompson] that they did anything and arrested him.’

Norsworthy’s offences covered a 12-year-period between 1988 and 2000, when he abused children alongside Britain’s most notorious paedophile – William Goad.

Goad was jailed for life in 2004 after pleading guilty to raping a child, but Norsworthy faced trial after claiming he was innocent.

This meant his victims had to give evidence in open court, sharing their horrifying experiences at the hands of the ‘predatory paedophile’.

But the jury found Norsworthy guilty and he was sent to prison.

The mother continued: ‘To me he is worse than Goad – at least Goad pleaded guilty.

‘This pig made them all go through it and made us listen, sitting in the dock with a smirk on his chops.

‘I can’t guarantee that if I see him I won’t put my hands on him. There’s no forgiveness in my body.

‘When we was given parole last time me and Shirley went to Bristol to see him, but we didn’t find him – they’d already moved him.

‘Nobody told me he had been rearrested and sent back to prison. When I asked the parole board they admitted it was ‘something to do with children’.

‘So they let him out, he reoffends or breached his conditions.

‘Who’s to say he won’t do it again now? What does it take for them to realise paedophiles like him never change?’

The mother was also told that as of June 2020, when his sentence comes to an end, Norsworthy would no longer be subject to any licence conditions.

William Goad - one of the most prolific child molesters in British legal history

William Goad - one of the most prolific child molesters in British legal history

William Goad – one of the most prolific child molesters in British legal history

The mother added: ‘Next year he can be back in Plymouth – and he will because his friends are here. There’s no remorse in him.

‘He could follow my son if he wanted to – my son gave evidence back then. Knowing what he [Norsworthy] is like he would seek revenge on my son.

‘What was done to my boy is etched in my brain, every day I re-live it.’

She said her son suffered a debilitating brain injury after suffering encephalitis around three years after giving his evidence in court.

He was hospitalised for a lengthy period of time and as a result has no short term memory.

She said despite now being in his 30s, her son ‘behaves like a seven-year-old’, and that in some respects it was a blessing as he does not remember that period of his life.

She said: ‘His memories are there, but because of his short term memory it’s not at the forefront.

‘It’s like a severe form of dementia. But it means he needs 24-hour care and I can’t leave him on his own.

‘I feel that he [Norsworthy] got him on that road, which led him to suffer.

‘When my son told me what had happened – it broke me. I haven’t got a life now, it was taken away from me.

‘It’s about constantly thinking about things that have happened to my son.

‘You hear the names [Norsworthy and Goad] and it all comes back.

‘I blame them for what happened to my son and what is happening to him now.

(l-r) Detective Constable Shirley Thompson, Danny Salmon (foreground) and Ray Zola (background) leave the High Court after the Appeal Court ruled not to increase paedophile William Goad's eligibility for parole tariff

(l-r) Detective Constable Shirley Thompson, Danny Salmon (foreground) and Ray Zola (background) leave the High Court after the Appeal Court ruled not to increase paedophile William Goad's eligibility for parole tariff

(l-r) Detective Constable Shirley Thompson, Danny Salmon (foreground) and Ray Zola (background) leave the High Court after the Appeal Court ruled not to increase paedophile William Goad’s eligibility for parole tariff

‘My life is about making sure [my son] is okay. He was just eight years old when [Norsworthy] went for him.

‘When he finally told me he admitted that when he was younger he used to get into trouble on purpose so he could be sent to prison, so that he could be safe.

‘The stress of it eats at you. It’s physically painful. He is out enjoying his life and he shouldn’t be out.

‘I truly wish he was dead. If hanging was brought back I would pull the lever. I’ve never hated anyone like I do him.

‘I’ve no forgiveness for him, not in a million years, not for him.’

The Ministry of Justice was approached for a statement but said they could not comment on individual cases.

Goad died in 2012.

 

Link hienalouca.com

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