Mysterious alien-like sea monsters that lurk UNDERWATER

Marine animals are one of the few remaining mysteries in the natural world and stunning images have revealed the eerie mystery of some of these creatures.

Juvenile sea monsters were photographed in the dead of night off the coast of the Philippines in the Pacific Ocean.

Still in the early stages of development the larvae have yet to develop the full colouration of an adult and their first specks of colour contrast strikingly against the translucent glow emanating from the rest of animal.

Scroll down for video 

This wunderpus octopus is in its larval stage and measures only one inch (2.5 cm) in length. Octopuses are one of the most intelligent invertebrates and this animal was captured on camera at 15 feet (five metres) underwater at around 2am local time 

This wunderpus octopus is in its larval stage and measures only one inch (2.5 cm) in length. Octopuses are one of the most intelligent invertebrates and this animal was captured on camera at 15 feet (five metres) underwater at around 2am local time 

This wunderpus octopus is in its larval stage and measures only one inch (2.5 cm) in length. Octopuses are one of the most intelligent invertebrates and this animal was captured on camera at 15 feet (five metres) underwater at around 2am local time 

This five inch long reef fin squid looks lie it may belong in a sci-fi film but was found off the coast of Janao Bay Inn, Philippines. The images were taken using a method dubbed 'bonfire diving' and involves planting a torch roughly 15 feet (5 metres) away from the water's edge on the sandy reef

This five inch long reef fin squid looks lie it may belong in a sci-fi film but was found off the coast of Janao Bay Inn, Philippines. The images were taken using a method dubbed 'bonfire diving' and involves planting a torch roughly 15 feet (5 metres) away from the water's edge on the sandy reef

This five inch long reef fin squid looks lie it may belong in a sci-fi film but was found off the coast of Janao Bay Inn, Philippines. The images were taken using a method dubbed ‘bonfire diving’ and involves planting a torch roughly 15 feet (5 metres) away from the water’s edge on the sandy reef

Jun V Lao, an amateur photographer from Pasig in Indonesia, captured the photos with an underwater camera at night while visiting Janao Bay Inn, Philippines.

The scuba diver claims his images showcase larval marine wildlife in a unique manner.

Mr Lao believes the haunting appearance of the animals makes these fish the closest thing to aliens on earth.

Mr Lao said: ‘It’s not everyday you see alien like creatures living right here beneath our oceans for real.

‘The images shared are larval stages of various fish species, roughly from 1mm in size to an inch which you can only capture during diving at the wee hours of the night

Another reef fin squid, this critter measuring only three inches long, displays the suckers on the many tentacles in a vibrant white and contrasts brilliantly with the blue hue emanating from the head of the beast 

Another reef fin squid, this critter measuring only three inches long, displays the suckers on the many tentacles in a vibrant white and contrasts brilliantly with the blue hue emanating from the head of the beast 

Another reef fin squid, this critter measuring only three inches long, displays the suckers on the many tentacles in a vibrant white and contrasts brilliantly with the blue hue emanating from the head of the beast 

A tiny lionfish at its larval stage is snapped from above as it floats in the midnight waters of the Pacific Ocean. Adults are known for their striking colouration and long spikes that make it one of the most easily distinguishable fish in the world but this six millimetre long juvenile has yet to develop much in the way of colour

A tiny lionfish at its larval stage is snapped from above as it floats in the midnight waters of the Pacific Ocean. Adults are known for their striking colouration and long spikes that make it one of the most easily distinguishable fish in the world but this six millimetre long juvenile has yet to develop much in the way of colour

A tiny lionfish at its larval stage is snapped from above as it floats in the midnight waters of the Pacific Ocean. Adults are known for their striking colouration and long spikes that make it one of the most easily distinguishable fish in the world but this six millimetre long juvenile has yet to develop much in the way of colour

Sea Snails can reach huge sizes but this baby is a mere five millimetres long. Its developing shell can be seen glowing with a warm amber hue but the rest of its body remains largely undeveloped

Sea Snails can reach huge sizes but this baby is a mere five millimetres long. Its developing shell can be seen glowing with a warm amber hue but the rest of its body remains largely undeveloped

Sea Snails can reach huge sizes but this baby is a mere five millimetres long. Its developing shell can be seen glowing with a warm amber hue but the rest of its body remains largely undeveloped

A jellyfish devouring a larval fish is captured on camera. These alien-like fish have got up closer and personal with scuba diver Jun V Lao who caught the photos on his underwater camera at night The scuba diver claims is images showcase never before seen larval marine wildlife

A jellyfish devouring a larval fish is captured on camera. These alien-like fish have got up closer and personal with scuba diver Jun V Lao who caught the photos on his underwater camera at night The scuba diver claims is images showcase never before seen larval marine wildlife

A jellyfish devouring a larval fish is captured on camera. These alien-like fish have got up closer and personal with scuba diver Jun V Lao who caught the photos on his underwater camera at night The scuba diver claims is images showcase never before seen larval marine wildlife

‘It’s the closest thing to being in outer space, with a bonus of being surrounded by real life like aliens.’  

The images were taken using a method dubbed ‘bonfire diving’ and involves planting a torch roughly 15 feet (5 metres) away from the water’s edge on the sandy reef. 

Animals flood to the artificial light and Mr Lao snapped the images of the fish that were drawn to the torch’s glow. 

Ideally, the light should be placed at a location where the water has a weak current. 

This tiny, nondescript mass is an octopus vulgaris in its larval stage and only six millimetres in size. The tentacles can barely be determined from one another and the large eye and brain are the only easily identifiable features of the fragile animal 

This tiny, nondescript mass is an octopus vulgaris in its larval stage and only six millimetres in size. The tentacles can barely be determined from one another and the large eye and brain are the only easily identifiable features of the fragile animal 

This tiny, nondescript mass is an octopus vulgaris in its larval stage and only six millimetres in size. The tentacles can barely be determined from one another and the large eye and brain are the only easily identifiable features of the fragile animal 

This Pealfish Larval stage is six inches (15cm) long but only has a girth of 3mm and the sea-through fish can be seen swimming through the water. When it reaches adulthood it will remain slender and elongated with no scales, translucent bodies, and dorsal fin rays which are shorter than their anal fin ray

This Pealfish Larval stage is six inches (15cm) long but only has a girth of 3mm and the sea-through fish can be seen swimming through the water. When it reaches adulthood it will remain slender and elongated with no scales, translucent bodies, and dorsal fin rays which are shorter than their anal fin ray

This Pealfish Larval stage is six inches (15cm) long but only has a girth of 3mm and the sea-through fish can be seen swimming through the water. When it reaches adulthood it will remain slender and elongated with no scales, translucent bodies, and dorsal fin rays which are shorter than their anal fin ray

A tiny larval stage squid looks on as Mr Lao captures the image of the three millimetre long fish. The gentle oranges and red specks will form the basis for its colouration as it develops and reaches adulthood

A tiny larval stage squid looks on as Mr Lao captures the image of the three millimetre long fish. The gentle oranges and red specks will form the basis for its colouration as it develops and reaches adulthood

A tiny larval stage squid looks on as Mr Lao captures the image of the three millimetre long fish. The gentle oranges and red specks will form the basis for its colouration as it develops and reaches adulthood

Linkhienalouca.com

(Просмотров всего: 69 Время, 1 визитов за день)

Leave a Reply