Scientists reveal the tactics people use most to stop themselves CHEATING

Scientists have revealed the tactics people use most to stop themselves from cheating with their partners.

A survey of more than 350 people found having more sex with your partner is the most popular method, followed by distancing yourself from the alluring person.

But hard luck if you’re struggling with feelings of temptation – researchers said none of the tactics used were effective at preventing infidelity.

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Scientists have revealed the tactics people use most to stop themselves from cheating with their partners (stock image)

Scientists have revealed the tactics people use most to stop themselves from cheating with their partners (stock image)

Scientists have revealed the tactics people use most to stop themselves from cheating with their partners (stock image)

Researchers at the University of New Brunswick asked 362 heterosexual adults how they had staved off temptations to cheat while in a relationship.

Seventy-five per cent of the study’s respondents, who were aged between 19 and 63, selected ‘relationship enhancement’ as their primary tactic.

This ploy included things like taking their partner on a date, making an extra effort with their appearance around them, or having more sex with them.

The second most-popular was ‘proactive avoidance’, which involved maintaining distance from the temptation.

As well as physically avoiding the temptation, people also avoided getting close in conversation with that person.

The third and final tactic used by people was ‘derogation of the temptation’, which involved feelings of guilt, and thinking about the tempting person in a negative light.

A survey of more than 350 people found having more sex with your partner is the most popular method, followed by distancing yourself from the alluring third party (stock image)

A survey of more than 350 people found having more sex with your partner is the most popular method, followed by distancing yourself from the alluring third party (stock image)

A survey of more than 350 people found having more sex with your partner is the most popular method, followed by distancing yourself from the alluring third party (stock image)

WHAT TACTICS DO PEOPLE USE TO STOP THEMSELVES CHEATING?

Researchers at the University of New Brunswick asked 362 heterosexual adults how they had staved off temptations to cheat while in a relationship.

1. ‘Relationship enhancement’ 

Seventy-five per cent of the study’s respondents, who were aged between 19 and 63, selected ‘relationship enhancement’ as their primary tactic.

This ploy included things like taking their partner on a date, making an extra effort with their appearance around them, or having more sex with them.

2. ‘Proactive avoidance’ 

The second most-popular was ‘proactive avoidance’, which involved maintaining distance from the temptation.

As well as physically avoiding the temptation, people also avoided getting close in conversation with that person.

3. ‘Derogation of the temptation’ 

The third and final tactic used by people was ‘derogation of the temptation’, which involved feelings of guilt, and thinking about the tempting person in a negative light.

Participants reported flirting less when they applied the final, ‘derogation of the temptation’ strategy.

But none of the strategies had an effect on the levels of romantic infidelity, sexual infidelity, and whether the relationship survived.

Psychologist Dr Alex Fradera, who was not involved in the research, said the findings show little can be done once feelings of temptation have crept in.

Unfortunately for anyone battling temptation, a followup study found that the techniques were largely ineffective.

Participants reported flirting less when they applied the final, ‘derogation of the temptation’ strategy.

But none of the strategies had an effect on the levels of romantic infidelity, sexual infidelity, and whether the relationship survived.

Psychologist Dr Alex Fradera, who was not involved in the research, said the findings show little can be done once feelings of temptation have crept in.

He wrote in BPS Digest: ‘As informative as this research is, it paints a gloomy picture.

‘We may call upon these techniques, but they don’t appear to make much difference in staving off temptation.’ 

ARE MEN WITH SHORT AND WIDE FACES MORE LIKELY TO CHEAT?

Researchers from Nipissing University in Canada looked at how different facial features affect sexual behaviours.

The study involved 314 undergraduate students who were in romantic relationships.

Each student completed a questionnaire about their behaviour, sex drive, sexual orientation, the chances they’d consider cheating, and how comfortable they were with the concept of casual sex.

The researchers also took a picture of each student to analyse their facial width-to-height ratios (FWHR).

Scientists have found that men and women with short and wide faces are more sexually motivated and likely to cheat than people with faces of other dimensions. Pictured is footballer, Wayne Rooney, who has previously cheated on his wife, Coleen

Scientists have found that men and women with short and wide faces are more sexually motivated and likely to cheat than people with faces of other dimensions. Pictured is footballer, Wayne Rooney, who has previously cheated on his wife, Coleen

Scientists have found that men and women with short and wide faces are more sexually motivated and likely to cheat than people with faces of other dimensions. Pictured is footballer, Wayne Rooney, who has previously cheated on his wife, Coleen

The results showed that men and women with a high FWHR – square and wide faces – reported a greater sex drive than others.

Men with a larger FWHR were also more easy-going when it comes to casual sex and would consider being unfaithful to their partners.

The researchers hope the findings will shed light on the role that facial features play in sexual relationships and mate selection.

Their research builds upon previous studies that have shown that certain psychological and behavioural traits are associated with particular facial width-to-height ratios (FWHR).

Square-faced men tend to be perceived as more aggressive, more dominant, more unethical, and more attractive as short-term sexual partners than men with thinner and longer faces. 

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